• 1 Vote(s) - 3 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Why such negativity?
#1
I have noticed lately that there seems to be a lot of negative comments on the forum aimed at ads on CL and other places about cars for sale and what pieces of junk they are. In a hobby that is based around 45+ year-old cars that were not really very rust-resistant to begin with, there are bound to be some less-than-pristine examples out there. Every time a rusted-out hulk or modified-to-hell car is sold to someone for stupid money, I figure it can only drive the value of nicer examples even higher! We all benefit that way!
  Reply
#2
Until your trying to get parts and you are priced out of the market by the latest resto craze. Just sayin I understand but it is a double edged knife. Seen it happen with various cars that were hot all of a sudden.

My dad is having a hell of a time getting parts for the 67 Ford Galaxie he is restoring. Because dudes with buckets of money are pricing him right out of the market for usable parts.
  Reply
#3
Exactly, not everyone is hanging on to their mustangs waiting on the value to go up.
It will soon cease to be an affordable hobby for many of us as all the parts cars are bought up by speculators looking to make a quick buck. Just my nickle's worth....
Until your trying to get parts and you are priced out of the market by the latest resto craze. Just sayin I understand but it is a double edged knife. Seen it happen with various cars that were hot all of a sudden.

My dad is having a hell of a time getting parts for the 67 Ford Galaxie he is restoring. Because dudes with buckets of money are pricing him right out of the market for usable parts.
[/quote]

Rick, not Rich or Dick or Richard
  Reply
#4
It's probably tough for an original owner (or even long-time owner) to understand, simply because you got in when things were plentiful and still less-desirable, regarding the attitude toward our model years.

Getting into the 'hobby' (for lack of a better word) of owning a '71-'73 Mustang these days is a mixed bag of good and bad. "Good," because there are more repop parts available, and more coming out more frequently as the enthusiasm level for our model year rises. "Bad," because as the numbers of good cars and good OE parts decline, and that enthusiasm rises, so do prices... which makes it tougher to get good deals on good things.

Then when you factor in the Fast & Loud Syndrome, you wind up paying a lot more for junk... especially, when put out there by low information sellers. People are lazy and greedy - hence the high prices for junk... or even decent stuff that's often misrepresented (ex: Rare Mach 1 Convertibles for Barrett-Jackson money).

Our negativity is a side-effect from having been educated on '71-'73 Mustangs, and seeing ignorant people scamming potential buyers, whether trying to or not (because they just don't know).

And as Gold Rush said, "not everybody is hanging onto their car just waiting for the value to go up," for whatever reason. In all honesty, I could care less what my car's monetary value might be, as I have no intention of ever selling it for any kind of profit margin - I'm a realist. I took a candidate for the crusher and [so far] have poured 10-times the original asking price into getting it back to its current 'not even drivable yet' condition. So until the day when someone foolishly plunks down over $40K for a lowly H-code home-built restomod (which I still wouldn't take), I would never make a dime back.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
  Reply
#5
I agree with what the guys have said above as well. I would also add to that and say my bitch is to do with a lot of parts for the '71-'73s that can't be gotton hold of for various reasons. That can make your project harder, extra time consuming and expensive.

Also when you factor in the guys who own our year's Mustangs overseas from America, the import taxes and costs with importing any parts is expensive as well, and severely adds to your cost of restoration as such.

Bottom line is nobody likes scammers or rip offs in any event.

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
  Reply
#6
I got my Mach 1 for $8500 and found it on Craigslist. Needs a little love but had everything with a nice paint job and no rust that I can find. I like using craigslist to buy and sell spare parts. My American Racing Wheels that came on the car with Comp TA tires will go on Craigslist soon and some drag racing type will probably be glad to get it. My last Mustang was also a Craigslist yard queen. Watch out for the Bull and ask smart questions. If it looks to good to be true it most likely is a scam.

Bright lime 72 Mach 1 with 351C 4V, with summit 600 carb(have a Holley too), Edelbrock dual-plane manifold, Hooker headers, 3 inch exhaust with flowmasters, 17 inch Eleanor wheels, FMX tranny, A/C, P/S, front disks and 350 rear gear. Drive it to work every day.
  Reply
#7
I agree with what's being said but I wonder if we would be having this conversation if we all had hemi cars, boss 9s,ZL1s and the like?

He has all the vices I admire and none of the virtues I despise
  Reply
#8
The thing you guys are missing is timing of what to buy and when to buy it. 71-73 Mustangs are nevermore to be just a cheap used car that almost anyone can finda decent example for low cost.
The trick is to buy a future-collectible before the low-forhead collectors latch on to them and start snapping them up.

Here is my tip for anyone who wants an awesome future-collectable for mere pocket-change:
87-92 Lincoln Mk-VII LSC.

Beautiful body style, great option content. Best of all? 5.0 HO engine. The ONLY car other than the Mustang GT that Ford ever put the 225 horse 5.0 in.
Full Mustang GT-style suspension, fabulous sport seats, great gauges, handles great, quick for its era

These cars retailed for $28,000- $32,000 when new...today a good condition, pampered example can easily be had for $1000 or less.

I have THREE of them...all bought for less than $800 each, all in great condition.

It is a great car to drive and to collect.

Dont be sorry in ten years and say nobody told you...
  Reply
#9
Point taken Kit, but speculating on any future event does not come with gauranties.

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
  Reply
#10
Kit Sullivan;185842 Wrote:The thing you guys are missing is timing of what to buy and when to buy it. 71-73 Mustangs are nevermore to be just a cheap used car that almost anyone can finda decent example for low cost.
The trick is to buy a future-collectible before the low-forhead collectors latch on to them and start snapping them up.

Here is my tip for anyone who wants an awesome future-collectable for mere pocket-change:
87-92 Lincoln Mk-VII LSC.

Beautiful body style, great option content. Best of all? 5.0 HO engine. The ONLY car other than the Mustang GT that Ford ever put the 225 horse 5.0 in.
Full Mustang GT-style suspension, fabulous sport seats, great gauges, handles great, quick for its era

These cars retailed for $28,000- $32,000 when new...today a good condition, pampered example can easily be had for $1000 or less.

I have THREE of them...all bought for less than $800 each, all in great condition.

It is a great car to drive and to collect.

Dont be sorry in ten years and say nobody told you...

Just looked these up as I had no idea what they looked like. I'd drive 1 for $800Cool I think they are at that point that they are just old enough for the styling to be interesting again.

He has all the vices I admire and none of the virtues I despise
  Reply
Share Thread:  




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)