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What steps to paint over original paint??
#1
Hey guys just wanted to pick your brains for some opinions and info. I am going to be painting a 71 Mach 1 with all original paint. Never been in an accident or re-sprayed. My question is how would you go about repainting it? I know opinions on this will vary from strip it to bare metal to scuff and shoot and everything in between. I do have some patch work to do on it and I maybe putting a new fender or two on, and a hood. So should I sand everything down with 80 or 180 and shoot whole car with an epoxy primer, do all the body work on top of that, shoot with high build 2k primer, block car and repeat as necessary, then sealer then base/clear?? What do you body guys recommend? What grits of paper?? How would you tackle this?? Is it even necessary to epoxy prime the good original paint if im not down to bare metal? I just don't want todays new products to have a bad reaction with the old paint. We are not going for a high end restoration show car. The owner knows that. I am shooting this in my garage with a homemade spray booth. The owner is going to drive this car ALOT! Any help and opinions will be great!! Thank you gentlemen!
[Image: 2rqmzpx.jpg]

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
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#2
That's a great question. I know blending in repaired areas can be tough - especially, if the color's not perfectly matched (to include the proper amount of fade due to age & sunburn, etc.). I agree that it might be better to re-shoot the whole thing - that way, you'll know for sure what you have all over the entire car.

I know I replaced the corner panels of my '80 Jeep CJ-7 before I bought the Mustang, and it turned out great. Even though I took a piece of the original panel to the paint shop for them to match it all up, it didn't come out 100% perfect, color-wise... and even then, in the sun you can tell where the new paint blended into the old mostly because the metal flake laid down differently. I used custom mixed rattle can paint-bombs & U-POL clear coat, and I love how the finish came out... but the "blend" is more noticeable than I would've liked. Oh well - it's a Jeep, after all. Wink

I'll be interested to hear from the pros as well.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#3
Mister 4x4;283971 Wrote:That's a great question. I know blending in repaired areas can be tough - especially, if the color's not perfectly matched (to include the proper amount of fade due to age & sunburn, etc.). I agree that it might be better to re-shoot the whole thing - that way, you'll know for sure what you have all over the entire car.

I know I replaced the corner panels of my '80 Jeep CJ-7 before I bought the Mustang, and it turned out great. Even though I took a piece of the original panel to the paint shop for them to match it all up, it didn't come out 100% perfect, color-wise... and even then, in the sun you can tell where the new paint blended into the old mostly because the metal flake laid down differently. I used custom mixed rattle can paint-bombs & U-POL clear coat, and I love how the finish came out... but the "blend" is more noticeable than I would've liked. Oh well - it's a Jeep, after all. Wink

I'll be interested to hear from the pros as well.

Not doing any blending Eric. Gonna paint the whole car. But want to make sure the old paint don't react with any of the new materials. That's why I was thinking about shooting whole car with epoxy primer first, to seal it all in.

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
  Reply
#4
Yeah... I got that, and actually agreed with your plan to paint the whole car. Wink whistling Shootself

rofl

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#5
turtle5353;283947 Wrote:Hey guys just wanted to pick your brains for some opinions and info. I am going to be painting a 71 Mach 1 with all original paint. Never been in an accident or re-sprayed. My question is how would you go about repainting it? I know opinions on this will vary from strip it to bare metal to scuff and shoot and everything in between. I do have some patch work to do on it and I maybe putting a new fender or two on, and a hood. So should I sand everything down with 80 or 180 and shoot whole car with an epoxy primer, do all the body work on top of that, shoot with high build 2k primer, block car and repeat as necessary, then sealer then base/clear?? What do you body guys recommend? What grits of paper?? How would you tackle this?? Is it even necessary to epoxy prime the good original paint if im not down to bare metal? I just don't want todays new products to have a bad reaction with the old paint. We are not going for a high end restoration show car. The owner knows that. I am shooting this in my garage with a homemade spray booth. The owner is going to drive this car ALOT! Any help and opinions will be great!! Thank you gentlemen!
[Image: 2rqmzpx.jpg]

I would do the body work. Make sure the primer is sanded well back off any unscuffed paint. I would then DA with 320 and use a good scuff pad to get into the corners and crevices that will require good adhesion to make sure the new paint sticks. These areas are usually the first to flake off. I would then use a good sealer to get the car into one color, then paint with base/clear. You could use single stage paint if you have a dirt free environment but base clear gives the best finish. If it is indeed factory paint I wouldn't expect any lifting or other adverse reaction. The sealer should help with any issues like that. Good luck.

Dave

Tradition is the preservation of the flame, not the adoration of the ashes.
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#6
That car looks pretty darn nice to have it's original paint, not many of them left. Doesn't address your question but around here it would win more shows being a survivor than with new paint. I fully understand the owner wants what he wants, look like a very nice canvass. Looking forward to seeing the finished car.

Jim

M code 71 Mach 1, 351 4V Cleveland, Ram Air (not factory), C6 Trans, 3.5 rear
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#7
I think the real answer would depend on budget and what your being paid for the job. That will dictate which process to use. As a example if your being paid lets say 5k for the entire job including materials there's no way you would want to strip the car to bare metal unless of course you want to work for free and donate your own money on top of it. So in order to answer the question we need to know what the materials allowance is and what the labor allowance is. Once those numbers are in place you can then figure out, tailor the best method that's fair to you and the owner.

LOVE OF BEAUTY IS TASTE..THE CREATION OF BEAUTY IS ART
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#8
Qcode351mach;284008 Wrote:I think the real answer would depend on budget and what your being paid for the job. That will dictate which process to use. As a example if your being paid lets say 5k for the entire job including materials there's no way you would want to strip the car to bare metal unless of course you want to work for free and donate your own money on top of it. So in order to answer the question we need to know what the materials allowance is and what the labor allowance is. Once those numbers are in place you can then figure out, tailor the best method that's fair to you and the owner.

Scott, right now I'm planning to budget approx $3,000 for materials. As far as labor I'm hoping to be able to put in 200-250 man hours on the project to make it worth my while. If I go a little over that I'm ok up to around 275 hrs. This includes replacing quarter panel, trunk pan, drop offs, tail light panel, body and paint work. Let me know what you think. I also plan on removing the doors, hood, and fenders to make sure I get everything painted right.

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
  Reply
#9
Hey Kevin, My paint job was 4k in materials and rite at 350 hrs. That's not counting the metal work. Just mud,blocking,painting,color sanding clearing twice,then polishing.

My brother and my buddy both have been working in production shops for 40 years and agreed that my original paint was fine to paint over. I think the over all statement was " Don't over think this body work crap" and ' It will be fine with quality product"

The original paint was sanded with 320 after the body work was done.


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- Mike
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#10
Hi Kevin,

I will PM you.

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
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