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want to buy a welder immediately!
#1
i'm getting tired of going places and borrowing and yada yada yada to use a welder so i want to get my own. i've always heard people say, get a 220 and don't think about a 110. looking at specs of most 110's it looks like they will weld 3/16's just fine. however, hobart will weld 1/4 inch with a single pass. it looks like people's reviews looks like the welder wil actually do it. the specific welder i'm speaking of is a hobart welder 140.

there now are welders that will use 110 plug and a 220 plug for dual playage. i don't know how much it'll cost to wire up a 220 plug in my house but the good news is where i'll plug it in at is right on the opposite of the wall of my fuse box. i guess some people rig up a dryer plug to run off of the dryer outlet so maybe i can do this because my dryer is right next to my garage. the dryer is only a 30 amp fuse and i hear welders have 50 amp fuses in them but yet again people do this all the time.

i'm looking for help on deciding but it looks like a hobart handler 140 will do what i want to do cuz i don't think i'll ever weld anything thicker than 1/4 inch. hell, i believe the main part of my trailer is made up of 3/16 thick metal. the ramps it came with is 3/16 or thinner. my subframe connectors are definitely aren't 3/16 thick. so i don't know if its really important to get something to be able to weld something thicker than 1/4.

i've never used a 110v welder thought so i don't know what to expect and i don't know anybody who has one. i plan on at first using it with flux core wire without the gas but of course eventually using the gas for better welds.

any help would be greatly appreciated.
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#2
Olie, The Hobart welders are good as are the Lincolns and Millers. The problem with the name brand 110 volt welders is that they are all increase the heat setting (voltage) in steps. That works fine but if you step up to beyond their entry models then you get a continuous variable heat control that allows precise voltage for the thickness your welding.

My Lincoln welder died when Katrina put my house under water a few years ago. I bought an Eastwood 110 mig unit & couldn't be happier. It has variable voltage and in my opinion is as good as and has better features than the big 3 name brands. Plus it has a 3year warrantee. Check it out before you pull the trigger on the Hobart. They have an ebay site where you can get it with shipping for $320 or so. It arrived 2 days after I ordered.

[Image: 386_07_10_13_5_58_42.jpeg]
My Mustangs:
71 M-code Mach 1, Medium Blue/White Sport, 4R70W, 3L50, Factory Ram Air.
72 Q-code Mach 1, Pewter/Black Sport, 4-spd, 3L25.
65 Convertible, Britney Blue/White/White, more modified than original.
05 Convertible, Legend Lime/Tan/Tan, future classic??
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#3
Don65Stang;78218 Wrote:Olie, The Hobart welders are good as are the Lincolns and Millers. The problem with the name brand 110 volt welders is that they are all increase the heat setting (voltage) in steps. That works fine but if you step up to beyond their entry models then you get a continuous variable heat control that allows precise voltage for the thickness your welding.

My Lincoln welder died when Katrina put my house under water a few years ago. I bought an Eastwood 110 mig unit & couldn't be happier. It has variable voltage and in my opinion is as good as and has better features than the big 3 name brands. Plus it has a 3year warrantee. Check it out before you pull the trigger on the Hobart. They have an ebay site where you can get it with shipping for $320 or so. It arrived 2 days after I ordered.

are you able to weld up to 1/4 inch on a single pass? are you able to weld with good results?

i need to repair two areas on the floor pan before i put carpet in and a few holes on the floor.
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#4
It welds as good as or better than my Lincoln did. I've never welded 1/4 inch stuff so I don't know. Try googling the question...I'm sure someone has an opinion about welding thick stuff with it. It works great on sheet metal. I use an argon blend gas to shield with.

[Image: 386_07_10_13_5_58_42.jpeg]
My Mustangs:
71 M-code Mach 1, Medium Blue/White Sport, 4R70W, 3L50, Factory Ram Air.
72 Q-code Mach 1, Pewter/Black Sport, 4-spd, 3L25.
65 Convertible, Britney Blue/White/White, more modified than original.
05 Convertible, Legend Lime/Tan/Tan, future classic??
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#5
A 110 welder and a bottle of gas will weld any sheet metal repair you need to do. I bought an eastwood 220 welder and love it. I have had it about year and half with no problems and use it alot. It was around 500 bucks and came with a spool gun to weld aluminum.

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
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#6
turtle5353;78224 Wrote:A 110 welder and a bottle of gas will weld any sheet metal repair you need to do. I bought an eastwood 220 welder and love it. I have had it about year and half with no problems and use it alot. It was around 500 bucks and came with a spool gun to weld aluminum.

i like to weld up thing like, bracing the saddles on the axle housing. welding brackets onto the car, welding box frame onto the trailer. d- rings onto a trailer and yada yada yada so i'm not just doing sheet metal stuff.

most of the time i'll be welding 1/8 and 3/16 stuff.
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#7
my panther 172 unimig (aussie) can go down to 27A, whereas the less powerful one's and including many aluminum transformer one's cannot go that low. The lower they can go lower which is better for sheet metal. Try to get a copper transformer name brand and you can't go wrong.

[Image: Image3.png]
Jim
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#8
I have a Hobart Handler 135 in 110V. Works great on sheetmetal and things like angle iron up to the advertised 3/16"ish thickness. Quality in welding thicker stock varies depending on wire thickness, flux or shielded wire, etc.

Used a Snap On 220V back to back with mine when fabbing up new rear control arms for my Expedition and found the 220 MUCH easier to lay a proper bead with (approx. 3/16" stock) with my first guesstimate settings (wire speed and output). I was kind of surprised at the difference, honestly.

I would definitely consider a 220 if doing anything heavier than basic garage hobby type sheetmetal work.

Oh, and as for the flux core wire, it sucks. I only use it in a pinch when I run out of argon, or fixing typically crappy PA rusty stuff that I can't clean properly.
And even then it still sucks.

Pete - MotoArts Decals and Signs
'71 Sportsroof 351C-4V/4-speed - FINALLY under construction - no, wait, on hold again...
'90 Mustang 7-Up 5.0 ragtop, rolling beater
'66 Sunbeam Tiger Mk.IA, survivor
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#9
Definately want to run the argon/co2 mix, flux core sux bad!! If you are welding brackets on your rear end and things like that i would definately step up to the 220volt to get the proper penetration for the weld. A 110 can laydown a nice bead but that doesnt mean it burned in deep enough. I have seen plenty of "pretty" welds break right off because of the lack of penetration . I had a 110 hobart for a few years and it worked good on the smaller stuff and sheetmetal. but the 220 is the way to go in my opinion. hope this helps a little.

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
  Reply
#10
turtle5353;78233 Wrote:Definately want to run the argon/co2 mix, flux core sux bad!! If you are welding brackets on your rear end and things like that i would definately step up to the 220volt to get the proper penetration for the weld. A 110 can laydown a nice bead but that doesnt mean it burned in deep enough. I have seen plenty of "pretty" welds break right off because of the lack of penetration . I had a 110 hobart for a few years and it worked good on the smaller stuff and sheetmetal. but the 220 is the way to go in my opinion. hope this helps a little.

ok, now the question is how do i cheaply wire a 220 plug outlet into my garage or how do i make a dryer plug work with the welder?
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