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Toe-in fine tuning at home
#1
This question is related to our Mustangs and other cars in general. Let's say that I had my car recently aligned with a toe-in value and I wanted to make subtle adjustments, can I follow this procedure:
-Figure out the pitch of the threads (1/turns per inch).
-Given a desired adjustment, calculate based on the pitch how many degrees the tie rod should be turn. Understanding that each tie rod is turned half of the total degrees.
-Mark the position of the tie rod nuts and turn them the same amount of degrees. Make sure I am turning both tie rods either inwards or outwards depending on the desired outcome.

It makes sense to me and sounds easy. However, I want to make sure that I am not missing anything so that's why I wanted to post the question in this forum rich in knowledge.
Chin Chin Chin

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
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#2
Toe is measured in inches. You could simply adjust the toe in or out, drive and measure afterwards. You should only need to increase toe if the car wanders under hard braking.


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#3
Because the point where you measure toe is further away from the upper and lower ball joints than the connection point of the tie rod ends, the toe measurement will change more than the tie rod end change. Also, because the sleeve is turning on threads on both ends you have to double the length a tie rod end moves per turn of the sleeve, which means 4 times the length of the thread pitch when turning both sleeves. So, an eighth of a turn on a tie rod adjustment sleeve will have a noticeable effect on the toe measurement.

And, yes, you have to turn both sleeves an equal amount to maintain steering wheel spoke position. If the steering wheel is not properly centered (spokes even) you have to move one sleeve in one direction and the other sleeve in the opposite direction to get the spokes even.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#4
(03-05-2019, 03:29 PM)Don C Wrote: Because the point where you measure toe is further away from the upper and lower ball joints than the connection point of the tie rod ends, the toe measurement will change more than the tie rod end change. Also, because the sleeve is turning on threads on both ends you have to double the length a tie rod end moves per turn of the sleeve, which means 4 times the length of the thread pitch when turning both sleeves. So, an eighth of a turn on a tie rod adjustment sleeve will have a noticeable effect on the toe measurement.

And, yes, you have to turn both sleeves an equal amount to maintain steering wheel spoke position. If the steering wheel is not properly centered (spokes even) you have to move one sleeve in one direction and the other sleeve in the opposite direction to get the spokes even.

Yes Don. Thank you. I forgot to account for the location of the tie rod and the double threads. That said, to account for the location of the tie rod you will have to measure the distance from the tie rod to the axis of tire rotation (center of tire). Then, knowing the radius of your tires, you take the ratio of these two measurements and that will be the over factor.

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
  Reply
#5
Yes, that should get you very close to the toe change per revolution of the sleeves.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#6
What exactly are you trying to gain by adjusting the toe? Simplest way to determine the change per rotation would be to set the car up on jackstands with the tires off and hubs at ride height. Use a straight edge off the rotor, measure at the radius of the tire tread to a fixed vertical plane.


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#7
(03-06-2019, 02:32 PM)Hemikiller Wrote: What exactly are you trying to gain by adjusting the toe? Simplest way to determine the change per rotation would be to set the car up on jackstands with the tires off and hubs at ride height. Use a straight edge off the rotor, measure at the radius of the tire tread to a fixed vertical plane.

My question is general and not directed to my Mustang. I wanted to tweak the toe-in in my SUV to see if I can reduce straight line wandering.

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
  Reply
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