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This can't be good!
#1
Washed the car for the first time. No high pressure spray or anything. Did run water over the top looking for leaks. No water in interior or trunk area. Washed car on an incline then pulled it in to garage. It was still wet and dripping a little but there seemed to be a LARGE amount of water running out of the car between the rear of the door and the rear fender well. Almost if it had been trapped until the car was on a level surface. Can't imagine this being normal! How did the water get there and more importantly, How is it getting out??
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#2
is it a vert ? verts have weep holes that can become plugged over time you can access the weep holes @ the inside rear door jamb (small vent )
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#3
Try not to wash your car in this manner.

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
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#4
Two things come to mind. If your car rear window does not roll down, then the seal between the glass and the sail panel, or the belt weatherstrip is leaking. The water will accumulate down inside the inner and outer quarter panel at the floor behind the trim panel where there is a drain.
Then again, if the rear window does roll down, it may have been left open a crack in which case the same thing applies to where the water drains out.

The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it. 
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#5
A convertible has a gutter system that runs around the entire rear of the top. Pretty much where the chrome is located. When you wash the top or in rain the water goes into the gutter and runs to each side and empties into the inner rocker between the inner panel and the outer skin. There should be a drain hole that the water can get out.
The water also goes between the window and the outer skin. No window felts made will keep water out of the inner quarter. Also the doors are the same.
For this reason I do not use a hose or pressure washer to wash one of these cars. The seam sealer on our cars went on before any paint was sprayed. So when the sealer cracks water gets into the crack and feeds the rust. The cars were not dipped into primer only sprayed so lots of areas are bare metal. The water running from the gutter sometimes gets into the floorboard and goes under the back seat causing rust there. The area around the rear tail light gaskets holds water also and causes the tail light panel to rust out.
I have cars that lived all their life in California that have more rust than a car that lived in Michigan all it's life. This is due to them washing the car in California and feeding the rust inside the panels. Washing your car with lots of water is one of the worst things you can do especially a vert. Just because a car comes from a dry climate does not make it rust free for sure.
The picture is of a vert with the top removed I was sealing up the cracked sealer in the gutter system to stop water from getting in. After repairing the sealer I coated in POR to help protect it.


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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
Tongue
David
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#6
Thanks all for the replies. I'm breathing a sigh of relief knowing that on a convert water is supposed to drain down and then weep out! Was afraid there was a big ole rusted hole in the bottom of the car that I hadn't found. Bear with me - I'm learning. And thanks for the great Pic's
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#7
I've been following David's lead. Little or no water ever touches my car anymore. If it got filthy maybe then.
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#8
I get the point of why not to use water but how do you keep the car clean? I drive my car every chance I get and it gets dirty, either dust, brake dust, or road dirt etc. A car duster does not remove this stuff.

'73 Grandé H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

'73 F code convertible. Bright red. Needs total restore. (IE HOT MESS)

- Jason
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#9
He didnt say not to use water, he said not to use a hose....do not spray pressured water on the car because the seals are not tight. A bucket and a sponge and elbo grease is always an option.
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#10
Hi Jason,

These days there are several brands of products and varying techniques out there to wash your car in the waterless or (no hose way)

If you use your Mustang as an everyday driver, then yes, it will attract a fair amount of dirt and road grime on the car depending on road and weather conditions when you drive around. In my case, my two Mustangs only get driven on weekends for small cruises out and about. I will never take my cars out driving if the weather looks like rain or is or has been raining. The worst case scenario is when it has not rained in your area for some time and the roads are dirty and greasy. Then, a small to moderate amount of rainfall comes down to turn the roads into a dirty mush bowl. This dirty mush then gets flung up by other cars and trucks and transferred onto your car when you drive around in these conditions. This road grime or filthy road mush gets deposited on your car and gets into just about every crack and crevice - not good at all and very hard to clean properly.

Also, i never use a garden hose or pressure washer to clean my Mustangs. What David has said in his posts is very true. These old Mustangs tend to have water leak issues in one way or another. The last thing you want to worry about is any water finding it's way into the cabin or floor of your car. That is bad news for rusting out issues and smelly, mouldy carpets. It's the same for your trunk areas. David is correct again when he says that these cars were not dipped back in their manufacture days, and so there are hidden or unseen areas that never got coated properly and are susceptible to rusting out. The problem is that when a car gets dirty from normal driving around, it gets chemicals and acid rain lodging on the surface of the car. This happens more so when you live in big industrial cities and air planes flying over head all the time. So when you go to wash your car with a garden hose, you are letting these acids and chemicals wash into all the cavities of your car.Over a period of many washes and time, you will end up getting residue deposits and build ups of these chemicals or acids. They then act as accelerators or promoters of rust in all your inner panels that would not have any proper paint or anti rust coatings on them. It's the same with using straight detergents to wash a car with. They contain chemicals like phosphates in them that actually act as accelerators or promoters of rust in your inner panels. That's why i always recommend using a good quality wash and wax product if you insist on washing your car with a hose. It helps solve this very problem.

In my case, the basic technique i use for my Mustangs is to use either a soft feather duster or a compressed air blower gun and first go around the whole car and dust off or blow off any initial dust or dirty residue. Then i will use a good quality wet chamois (not dripping wet) and gently go around the car, starting from the top and working my way around the car as i go to the bottom areas last. Don't apply too much pressure when doing this process. Also, go to the trouble of washing out your chamois after wiping off one or two panels only. This helps prevent any scratching of the paint and also transferring dirt back onto the car that you have wiped off. You can the use a microfibre towel to follow through straight away to buff up and dry the surface. I like to use a quick detailer spray wax at this point to apply a wax coating to the paint to finish off with. You move in and wipe off and buff off the detailer with a microfibre cloth to bring up a lovely finish. The name of the game is to try and minimize the possibility and not scratch the car's surfaces. If you go about it carefully and use the above techniques, you should not get into any trouble in that regard.

There are other products and techniques out there that are available to make use of. Here are a few references to go with -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b51DHV0-hDY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddHGr9SfeMA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDIWipQBAm0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-ShtSvQaSA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SaDgY8eBBo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8q2PiuwNqo

Hope that helps,

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
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