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Something's wrong
#21
runninpony 
(10-07-2018, 02:18 PM)Don C Wrote: Yes, it goes to the battery cable side of the starter solenoid/relay. Unless you have factory gauges, then it goes to single pole terminal block.

The car did not come with factory gauges but I added them on. Midlife converted my wiring harness, also a tach and voltmeter conversion by The Rocketman was added. Tested all gauges except tach and they're all moving but I don't know how accurate they will be.

Thanks to you sir, when you mentioned NEG battery cable goes to the block! After I bolted that cable to the block I know she'll turn over! I thought I connected that to the block but only had connected the little bracket that holds the starter cable, my stupidity!

71-73 Mustangs never die, they just go faster!
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#22
Hey, we all make mistakes that make us wonder how or why did we do that. I figure if we didn't make mistakes, for one, we wouldn't learn anything, and, for two, we wouldn't be doing anything.

I've got a good excuse now, brain farts caused by old age Smile



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#23
runninpony 
(10-08-2018, 11:33 AM)Don C Wrote: Hey, we all make mistakes that make us wonder how or why did we do that. I figure if we didn't make mistakes, for one, we wouldn't learn anything, and, for two, we wouldn't be doing anything.

I've got a good excuse now, brain farts caused by old age Smile

LOL, crack me up!

She's cranking I got fuel and spark but not firing. Had a few backfires through the carburetor. Could my dizzy be off by 180?

71-73 Mustangs never die, they just go faster!
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#24
Sounds like it may be, or timing way off. I would double check it. Do you need any help with getting the initial timing set?



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#25
runninpony 
(10-08-2018, 02:23 PM)Don C Wrote: Sounds like it may be, or timing way off. I would double check it. Do you need any help with getting the initial timing set?

I'm a rookie when it comes to that, so yes if you could help me that would be great. Thanks in advance!

71-73 Mustangs never die, they just go faster!
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#26
Pull the #1 plug. Rotate the engine by hand until the #1 cylinder is at TDC on the compression stroke. (put your finger over the spark plug hole to determine if it is the compression stroke or remove that valve cover and when the piston is coming up both valves should be closed). A quick and dirty to determine TDC is to use a dowel in the spark plug hole and watch it rise as you turn the engine over when it stops and starts to go back down you passed it turn back slightly to get to TDC. Then stab the distributor back in with the rotor pointing at where the #1 is on the distributor. When at TDC or close your timing marks should also indicate "0". this should get you close enough to start the engine and set the actual timing with a timing light. Hope this helps.

73 Grandé H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

- Jason


[Image: 082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg]
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#27
runninpony 
(10-08-2018, 03:10 PM)73pony Wrote: Pull the #1 plug. Rotate the engine by hand until the #1 cylinder is at TDC on the compression stroke. (put your finger over the spark plug hole to determine if it is the compression stroke or remove that valve cover and when the piston is coming up both valves should be closed). A quick and dirty to determine TDC is to use a dowel in the spark plug hole and watch it rise as you turn the engine over when it stops and starts to go back down you passed it turn back slightly to get to TDC. Then stab the distributor back in with the rotor pointing at where the #1 is on the distributor. When at TDC or close your timing marks should also indicate "0". this should get you close enough to start the engine and set the actual timing with a timing light. Hope this helps.

I did pull #1 plug but turned it with the starter, no helper. I cut the tops off of some cheap valve covers. I thought I had it very close it was right at zero on the crank with the rotor pointing at #1 on the dizzy. Are both valves closed on the compression stroke only? Is that the only way to tell? Thanks!

71-73 Mustangs never die, they just go faster!
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#28
First you'll need to find the compression stroke on the number one cylinder. Number one on Ford engines is the front cylinder on the right side of the block (as seen from the inside of the car). Everything on cars that has a right or left associated with it is as if you're sitting in the driver's seat and looking out of the windshield.

The easiest way to find the compression stroke is to remove all of the spark plugs so it is easier to turn over by hand. Make sure you keep track of which cylinder each spark plug cable runs to. You'll need to put a ratchet wrench on the crank harmonic balancer bolt to turn it by hand. Turn it, in the same direction you would to tighten the bolt, with your thumb over the number one cylinder spark plug hole until you feel the compression pressure pushing your finger off the hole. Now turn the crankshaft until the timing pointer points to 10° BTDC (before top dead center). Trace the number one spark plug cable to the distributor and see which terminal it is connected to. Most distributor caps have a 1 at the base of the terminal tower, but I have seen some that don't.

Make a mark on the distributor body directly below the number one terminal. Remove the distributor cap. Loosen the distributor hold-down bolt and rotate the distributor until the mark (for number 1 terminal) is under the rotor and the points just begin to open, when turning the distributor body clockwise. When the engine is running the distributor rotor turns counterclockwise.

Tighten the distributor hold-down bolt and replace the spark plugs and cables.

After you get it running you'll need to time it with a timing light.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#29
Both valves closed on the compression stroke. The exhaust valve is open on the exhaust stroke. I would recommend a breaker bar on the crank instead of the starter method. Much more accurate. The other way to tell is putting your thumb tightly over the spark plug hole while turning. You will feel it build pressure on the compression stroke.

Another possibility would be to double check your plug wires are in correct firing order. Remember there were 2 different firing orders for the 302. Earlier was 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8 and later was 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8. Make sure you are using the correct firing order for the cam that your engine builder installed.

73 Grandé H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

- Jason


[Image: 082-hot-rod-power-tour-2017-1970-1970s.jpg]
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#30
runninpony 
(10-08-2018, 03:45 PM)Don C Wrote: First you'll need to find the compression stroke on the number one cylinder. Number one on Ford engines is the front cylinder on the right side of the block (as seen from the inside of the car). Everything on cars that has a right or left associated with it is as if you're sitting in the driver's seat and looking out of the windshield.

The easiest way to find the compression stroke is to remove all of the spark plugs so it is easier to turn over by hand. Make sure you keep track of which cylinder each spark plug cable runs to. You'll need to put a ratchet wrench on the crank harmonic balancer bolt to turn it by hand. Turn it, in the same direction you would to tighten the bolt, with your thumb over the number one cylinder spark plug hole until you feel the compression pressure pushing your finger off the hole. Now turn the crankshaft until the timing pointer points to 10° BTDC (before top dead center). Trace the number one spark plug cable to the distributor and see which terminal it is connected to. Most distributor caps have a 1 at the base of the terminal tower, but I have seen some that don't.

Make a mark on the distributor body directly below the number one terminal. Remove the distributor cap. Loosen the distributor hold-down bolt and rotate the distributor until the mark (for number 1 terminal) is under the rotor and the points just begin to open, when turning the distributor body clockwise. When the engine is running the distributor rotor turns counterclockwise.

Tighten the distributor hold-down bolt and replace the spark plugs and cables.

After you get it running you'll need to time it with a timing light.
Don, I will do that this coming weekend, hopefully I can get some guys over to my place. The last time they were here the distributor was marked and crankshaft pulley was on 0 degree mark. Problem with turning it by hand is I have fan and radiator in the way, there's very little room. Thanks again for your input. 

Terry

71-73 Mustangs never die, they just go faster!
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