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Snap-On and Teng Spanners & Sockets
#11
(04-07-2019, 09:16 AM)Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs Wrote: I have not split a socket in years even the cheap ones.

You know, I was contemplating that, too. Before deciding tools had gotten better, I had to make sure it wasn't JUST that I learned how not to break them.
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#12
(04-07-2019, 06:24 PM)detritusmaximus Wrote:
(04-07-2019, 03:48 AM)Pegleg Wrote:
(04-06-2019, 09:55 PM)detritusmaximus Wrote: Steve-
If you use SAE in your search instead of AF, you might find more options. SAE and AF are the same thing, but probably anything made for the US will reference SAE instead.

Here is the SAE Gearwrench 13pc set:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/GearWrench-9312...QNHCNXX53E

AHA!!!! SAE. Thank You for the American name for AF, or American Finethread as we British call it
The past 3 years on this site has been a time of big learning. Everyday English spoken by Americans and British makes it very easy to understand each other. However over the past 3 years of being a owner of a Mustang and a member of this site i have discovered Americans and British speak a totally differant language when it comes to the words we allocate to car parts. It has made me appreciate, to some degree, how difficult it must be for people like Fabrice who's first language is not English or American English

Yeah, it gets confusing when two or three names are used for the same thing. I think AF actually stands for Across Flats. I saw that when looking things up. Maybe that is to separate it from how another system measures bolt heads, like maybe from point to point? Anyway, in SAE there are fine thread and coarse thread bolts/screws. Not something you really have to worry about, but if you go looking for bolts based on American Finethread, you might not get what you need, especially if it's actually a coarse thread!

When Americans and British made nuts and bolts pre metric The distance between each thread was a lot closer on American threads. So if you measured a American bolt measuring 1 inch you would find a lot more threads than was on a British 1 inch bolt which is why AF, here in the UK, was called American Finethread. The thread here in the UK was called a Whitworth thread. The "across the flats" you referred to is the flat of the thread. So the distance between the outter edge of the thread and the edge of the nut is differant in US and UK. Heres a part of a article i found online;

" Whitworth threads were introduced in the 1800s and are refered to as BSW for British Standard Whitworth. A finer thread was introduced and called British Standard Fine (BSF). AF was introduced much later and refers to Across Flats and was related to UNC(universal national coarse) and UNF(universal national fine) threads in the USA A 1/2 inch Whitworth socket is for a nut that fits on a 1/2 inch diameter thread, and is usually 1.5 times the diameter of the screwed rod across the flats of the nut. A 1/2 inch AF socket fits on a nut which is 1/2 inch across the flats and could be a much smaller threadsize".


If you go on Ebay UK and put in "Whitworth" spanners you will find imperial spanners. If you had a UK 1/2 inch spanner and a US 1/2 inch spanner they would do the same job.
So its even more confusing BSW, BSF, Whitworth, UNC, UNF, SAE, AF, American Finethread (American Fine-UNF). Why cant we just have a universal standardized terminology for everything. I was actually considering writing a dictionary for British users on this site at one point.

Its like wooworking screws with the "thread across the flats". If I bought a 3 inch woodwork screw the retailer would ask me what size 3 inch do i need. You can buy a 3 inch woodworking screw thats a number 6 or 8 or 10 or 12 etc. The 6 8 10 12 would tell me what size the thread is across the flat of the head. If you measured the size of a number 6  3 inch screw you would find it 3 inches long and 6mm across the width of the thread

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#13
Threads and thread sizes can and are confusing as hell. If you want to get really "screwed" up, go check out  Bicycle threads. British, French, American, all can be different.
AF wrenches (spanners) refer to the width "Across Flats" on the bolt heads. i.e. a 1/4" SAE bolt has a 7/16" AF head, 5/16" bolt is 1/2" AF and so forth. It doesn't matter if it's fine thread NF or course thread NC (for national fine or national course.) the bolt heads are the same size in general. There are some odd-balls, but you won't get into those on your car.
Best thing to do is NOT confuse British and American threads. It's like when I worked in Metric, I stayed in metric. I didn't confuse thing by converting unless I didn't have a choice depending on the machine I was operating.
Keep it simple my friend. You don't need to send a fortune on "Snap-On" wrenches. Most that are available these days won't break unless you put a 2 foot extension pipe on the thing.
Geoff.
EDIT: I changed 3/8" to 5/16: bolt. My bad!

I learn something new every day!
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#14
I need some proper spanners instead of the box of junk I use.

[Image: siggy.jpg]

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#15
(04-08-2019, 10:27 AM)1sostatic Wrote: I need some proper spanners instead of the box of junk I use.

Ditto. I opted for a mix of Tekton & Gearwrench and a new US Pro tools 9 drawer toolbox. No excuse not to tackle a job now.

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#16
(04-08-2019, 10:49 AM)Pegleg Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 10:27 AM)1sostatic Wrote: I need some proper spanners instead of the box of junk I use.

Ditto. I opted for a mix of Tekton & Gearwrench and a new US Pro tools 9 drawer toolbox. No excuse not to tackle a job now.

Hey Steve, good call and why not...…….. it's only money!!!

I learn something new every day!
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#17
(04-08-2019, 01:57 PM)Stanglover Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 10:49 AM)Pegleg Wrote:
(04-08-2019, 10:27 AM)1sostatic Wrote: I need some proper spanners instead of the box of junk I use.

Ditto. I opted for a mix of Tekton & Gearwrench and a new US Pro tools 9 drawer toolbox. No excuse not to tackle a job now.

Hey Steve, good call and why not...…….. it's only money!!!

Yeah. I spent around £900 in total icluding a new toolbox. Its a big spend but i renewed everything. My thinking was why pay someone else to do a job if i can do it myself. I would have to pay someone else if i didnt have the tools. A GOOD mechanic charges £55 per hour. So if i work on the car for 16 hours the tools have paid for themselves. I am no engine man so that work was farmed out. The interior i can do. The exterior strip i can do ready for paint as well as put the parts back on the exterior. My thinking was buy quality and you only buy once. I am 57 and know i will never have to replace again. lol most my tools were given to me by my grandfather and no ring spanners. I just had open ended spanners from my grandad and some very very inferior 1970's Chinese sockets that are metric and most are rounded off inside. I wanted tools for life. I didnt want to spend 900. It was painful because its money i could have spent on parts or paintworks. The only way i could justify the big spend was it will be a long term saving many many times over.

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#18
Totally agree, that's how I started. I had brought my first Mustang in to replace the balljoints and the shop refused to work on it because it was "too rusty", so I took the $200 they were going to charge me and went where every American boy went to buy tools - Sears. Bought a Haynes manual and the parts I needed from the local Acme Auto. Spent a little over $250 and still have that manual and those tools to this day. That was 1989. Heck, I probably have some random parts from that car in my current Mach.

To be honest, I'd kill to find a car that was as "rusty" as that Mustang. It needed one rear floor, small patches in the lower quarters and a taillight panel.


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