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Sister Cars-429 Mach/351 Sportsroof
#1
I am always looking at VIN#'s on the registry to see if I can find cars that are close or consecutive to mine. Recently "71 ram air 4-speed mach 1" put his 71 Sportsroof on the registry. VIN#118447

His is the closest that I can find to my VIN#118495. His car was on the assembly line 48 cars ahead of mine in Dearborn most likely on the same day in September of 1970. My car came off the line on the 25th of September, 1970.

The closest 429 car I could find was "tom429cjr" whose vin is 352 cars before mine. Tom's VIN# is 118143.

I verified that "71 ram air 4-speed mach 1" Sportsroof was built in Dearborn with a VIN decoder.

Just thought this was interesting to think about these cars being on that assembly line together so long ago and they are still here and still have a connection. Our two cars might not be sister cars but they are certainly 1st cousins!
  Reply
#2
From a previous thread/post:

Unfiortunately they did not go in straight order by the VINs...

Two cars with VINS one number apart could have been built weeks apart. I know it sounds jacked up but it is true. So basically 'sequentail unit numbers' were not exactly sequential!

To say it another way ---- The numbers could have been issued on the same day but the build sequence for those two cars could have been weeks apart. Two cars rolling down the same assembly line one behind the other could have numbers way off and maybe not even in numerical order because of many variables including body styles (fastbacks, converts, coupes), colors, and even specific options could have delayed the actual build date versus scheduled build date because of parts availability.

Ray

1971 Boss 351  
1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 
1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 
1973 Mach 1 (parts car)
  Reply
#3
Opps!

It was just pointed out to me that because vin#'s might be close does not mean they were on the assembly line in that order. There are apparently threads on here that talk about that.

I am sorry for any confusion and my stupidity on this subject. I assume then that only the Marti report would be able to show how close two vin#'s are based on when they were "bucked" and when they were actually built.

Thank you Boss 1 Ray for pointing this out to me!
  Reply
#4
The VIN was assigned when that vehicle was approved for production, not neccesarily when it was later scheduled for production.
  Reply
#5
Mike429cj;195845 Wrote:Opps!

It was just pointed out to me that because vin#'s might be close does not mean they were on the assembly line in that order. There are apparently threads on here that talk about that.

I am sorry for any confusion and my stupidity on this subject. I assume then that only the Marti report would be able to show how close two vin#'s are based on when they were "bucked" and when they were actually built.

Thank you Boss 1 Ray for pointing this out to me!

No prob but I'd like to say one more thing - confused OK but never stupidity! You're learning just like I am.

It is amazing to think of all the stuff I THOUGHT I knew about these cars. And then to think what I have learned from members of this site!!!

There are probably some things about your 429 car you know that I don't! Smile

Thanks to all who have ever posted to help others learn about these cars Exclamation

Ray

I got this related info straight from Marti's website

http://www.martiauto.com/faqfocus.cfm?qid=104


Serial Numbers: Ford serial numbers start with 100001. Lincoln and Mercury serial numbers start with 500001, 600001, or 800001 depending on make and year. For this reason, if you have, for example, a Mustang with serial number 100106, our report will list it as the 106th car scheduled for production.

Order Received (Order Date) This is the date an order was received by the Ford General Office from a dealer (or by a department within Ford if it was a company vehicle).

Car serialized (Serialized Date) This is the date the General Office assigned the plant that would assemble the vehicle and gave a consecutive unit number to the vehicle.

Bucked (Buck Date) This is the date the first piece of sheet metal was welded to another piece of sheet metal to begin forming the buck (if you imagine unbolting everything possible from your vehicle, that which remains is the buck. Generally, on this date, the entire body is produced, appropriate holes are punched, and the body is primed and painted. See http://www.martiauto.com/faqfocus.cfm?qid=56 for more info.

Scheduled for Build (Scheduled Date) At the time the General Office assigned the plant that would assemble the vehicle, it also projects a best estimate date that the vehicle would be constructed.

Actually Built (Build Date) Due to the fact events generally don’t go as planned, the Scheduled Date was not necessarily the actual date of manufacture. The actual build date is the date the vehicle begins to be assembled on the Trim and Chassis line. Generally, the vehicle is completed on this date.

Released (Release Date) This is the date the assembly plant released the vehicle to either a Convoy (trucking) company or Rail (road) company for delivery to the dealer.

Sold (Sold Date) This is the date the first retail customer purchased the vehicle or the date the vehicle was paid for by one department at Ford to the Marketing Department if it was a car sold within Ford.

About dates: Dates are manually input into the Ford database by Ford employees. We have no control over those dates. Generally, the dates form a logical pattern, but occasionally an obvious discrepancy occurs. For example, a vehicle may show a production date of January 2, 1968, but a release date of December 29, 1967. Logically, the vehicle could not have been released before it was manufactured. In a case like this, it could be simply someone having mistyped one of the dates. Another possibility, especially in the 60s and early 70s, is that someone at Ford wanted to make their month or year end report look better so they entered into the system that the vehicle was released even though it wasn’t. Obviously, we have no way of knowing what the correct date would be.

Some dates may appear to be mistypes. There are certain vehicles that, for example, have a scheduled build date like 65H, corresponding to August 65th. This is not an error. Rather, it was a system employed within Ford to keep track of certain types of vehicles, typically at the beginning of a model year. We have no further information about what the purpose of that tracking was.
On rare occasions, the month of manufacture listed on your report will be either one month earlier or one month later than the month listed on your VCL (vehicle certification label). This actually occurs when the department at Ford that produced the VCLs was either running ahead or behind schedule with the production of the VCLs. Because Ford Motor Company consisted of many large departments, it was not always possible for them to keep those departments in sync. Although technically the month of manufacture listed on the Marti Report is accurate and the label that is actually on your car is off one month and Ford considered the label "close enough" for government certification, we are allowed to reproduce the report and override the month of manufacture on the report to match your vehicle. Just return the report with picture proof of your original VCL. Keep in mind, the date listed for manufacture on the Marti Report is the true date of manufacture and you should use it when making restoration decisions.

Occasionally, one or more of the fields in the "IMPORTANT DATES" box is/are blank. This is because Ford did not record that info and we have no further information.

Order Type Ford Motor Company builds vehicles for different purposes and different customers. In fact, there are over twenty different classifications of order types. Some of the more common are:

Retail – an individual comes to a dealership and orders an as yet unbuilt vehicle
Stock – a dealer orders a vehicle to have available for display at his/her location
Basic – Ford has excess capacity on an assembly line and produces vehicles to keep the plant busy
Fleet – a company that orders five or more vehicles yearly qualifies for price breaks on these vehicles
Special Purpose Vehicle – a vehicle built by Ford for what the name implies
Introductory Show Unit – a vehicle built to demonstrate a new model. Generally this vehicle is shipped to be on display at some large public gathering
A-Plan – vehicles built for current Ford employees and sold at a discounted price
Z-Plan – vehicles built for retired Ford employees and sold at a discounted price
Lease – vehicles leased by Ford to an individual or a company

Ray

1971 Boss 351  
1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 
1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 
1973 Mach 1 (parts car)
  Reply
#6
Boss1Ray;195901 Wrote:
Mike429cj;195845 Wrote:Opps!

It was just pointed out to me that because vin#'s might be close does not mean they were on the assembly line in that order. There are apparently threads on here that talk about that.

I am sorry for any confusion and my stupidity on this subject. I assume then that only the Marti report would be able to show how close two vin#'s are based on when they were "bucked" and when they were actually built.

Thank you Boss 1 Ray for pointing this out to me!

No prob but I'd like to say one more thing - confused OK but never stupidity! You're learning just like I am.

It is amazing to think of all the stuff I THOUGHT I knew about these cars. And then to think what I have learned from members of this site!!!

There are probably some things about your 429 car you know that I don't! Smile

Thanks to all who have ever posted to help others learn about these cars Exclamation

Ray

I would bet you know quite a bit more than me when it comes to these cars. I find even the smallest detail about these cars fascinating. 71 ram air told me that his car was built on 9-30-70. His VIN was lower but mine came out the back door 5 days ahead of his!

I would have never known how this works if I had not posted about the VIN#'s. Again, it is all very interesting stuff. Now, if we could only time travel I would like to watch my car go down the assembly line. Of course there are other things I would like to go back in time to do but that is a whole other story.

Thank you for the information.
  Reply
#7
Boss1Ray;195901 Wrote:
Mike429cj;195845 Wrote:Opps!

It was just pointed out to me that because vin#'s might be close does not mean they were on the assembly line in that order. There are apparently threads on here that talk about that.

I am sorry for any confusion and my stupidity on this subject. I assume then that only the Marti report would be able to show how close two vin#'s are based on when they were "bucked" and when they were actually built.

Thank you Boss 1 Ray for pointing this out to me!

No prob but I'd like to say one more thing - confused OK but never stupidity! You're learning just like I am.

It is amazing to think of all the stuff I THOUGHT I knew about these cars. And then to think what I have learned from members of this site!!!

There are probably some things about your 429 car you know that I don't! Smile

Thanks to all who have ever posted to help others learn about these cars Exclamation

Ray

I got this related info straight from Marti's website

http://www.martiauto.com/faqfocus.cfm?qid=104


Serial Numbers: Ford serial numbers start with 100001. Lincoln and Mercury serial numbers start with 500001, 600001, or 800001 depending on make and year. For this reason, if you have, for example, a Mustang with serial number 100106, our report will list it as the 106th car scheduled for production.

Order Received (Order Date) This is the date an order was received by the Ford General Office from a dealer (or by a department within Ford if it was a company vehicle).

Car serialized (Serialized Date) This is the date the General Office assigned the plant that would assemble the vehicle and gave a consecutive unit number to the vehicle.

Bucked (Buck Date) This is the date the first piece of sheet metal was welded to another piece of sheet metal to begin forming the buck (if you imagine unbolting everything possible from your vehicle, that which remains is the buck. Generally, on this date, the entire body is produced, appropriate holes are punched, and the body is primed and painted. See http://www.martiauto.com/faqfocus.cfm?qid=56 for more info.

Scheduled for Build (Scheduled Date) At the time the General Office assigned the plant that would assemble the vehicle, it also projects a best estimate date that the vehicle would be constructed.

Actually Built (Build Date) Due to the fact events generally don’t go as planned, the Scheduled Date was not necessarily the actual date of manufacture. The actual build date is the date the vehicle begins to be assembled on the Trim and Chassis line. Generally, the vehicle is completed on this date.

Released (Release Date) This is the date the assembly plant released the vehicle to either a Convoy (trucking) company or Rail (road) company for delivery to the dealer.

Sold (Sold Date) This is the date the first retail customer purchased the vehicle or the date the vehicle was paid for by one department at Ford to the Marketing Department if it was a car sold within Ford.

About dates: Dates are manually input into the Ford database by Ford employees. We have no control over those dates. Generally, the dates form a logical pattern, but occasionally an obvious discrepancy occurs. For example, a vehicle may show a production date of January 2, 1968, but a release date of December 29, 1967. Logically, the vehicle could not have been released before it was manufactured. In a case like this, it could be simply someone having mistyped one of the dates. Another possibility, especially in the 60s and early 70s, is that someone at Ford wanted to make their month or year end report look better so they entered into the system that the vehicle was released even though it wasn’t. Obviously, we have no way of knowing what the correct date would be.

Some dates may appear to be mistypes. There are certain vehicles that, for example, have a scheduled build date like 65H, corresponding to August 65th. This is not an error. Rather, it was a system employed within Ford to keep track of certain types of vehicles, typically at the beginning of a model year. We have no further information about what the purpose of that tracking was.
On rare occasions, the month of manufacture listed on your report will be either one month earlier or one month later than the month listed on your VCL (vehicle certification label). This actually occurs when the department at Ford that produced the VCLs was either running ahead or behind schedule with the production of the VCLs. Because Ford Motor Company consisted of many large departments, it was not always possible for them to keep those departments in sync. Although technically the month of manufacture listed on the Marti Report is accurate and the label that is actually on your car is off one month and Ford considered the label "close enough" for government certification, we are allowed to reproduce the report and override the month of manufacture on the report to match your vehicle. Just return the report with picture proof of your original VCL. Keep in mind, the date listed for manufacture on the Marti Report is the true date of manufacture and you should use it when making restoration decisions.

Occasionally, one or more of the fields in the "IMPORTANT DATES" box is/are blank. This is because Ford did not record that info and we have no further information.

Order Type Ford Motor Company builds vehicles for different purposes and different customers. In fact, there are over twenty different classifications of order types. Some of the more common are:

Retail – an individual comes to a dealership and orders an as yet unbuilt vehicle
Stock – a dealer orders a vehicle to have available for display at his/her location
Basic – Ford has excess capacity on an assembly line and produces vehicles to keep the plant busy
Fleet – a company that orders five or more vehicles yearly qualifies for price breaks on these vehicles
Special Purpose Vehicle – a vehicle built by Ford for what the name implies
Introductory Show Unit – a vehicle built to demonstrate a new model. Generally this vehicle is shipped to be on display at some large public gathering
A-Plan – vehicles built for current Ford employees and sold at a discounted price
Z-Plan – vehicles built for retired Ford employees and sold at a discounted price
Lease – vehicles leased by Ford to an individual or a company

Ray
I can clear this up!

Assembly guy 1: Hey wanna try something funny
Assembly guy 2: sure what
Assembly guy 1: Let's play a trick
Assembly guy 2: okay I'm in ...what do you have in mind?
Assembly guy 1: well let's set the buck tags up so they look like the cars are close to the same finish date as another car.
Assembly guy 2: OHHHhhhhh so later years on down the road two guys might be talking..discover their buck tags have close numbers and ...
Assembly guy 1: A ...they'll think they got cars that were made AT THE SAME TIME!!!!

Buzzer rings for the union workers 5th break of the day...they walk off jovial with their surprise to develop years later.....


67 Diamond Blue Vert

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypG...mJJrHJ_B_Q]

DUDE

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!
  Reply
#8
I know this doesn't really belong here but you were talking about your car being a company lease plan and I thought you might like to see a Marti I have of a car I sold a few years back.
[Image: martireportgrande0001.jpg]








I am just here to eat my lunch and screw stuff up!!!!!Haha
  Reply
#9
I was a supplier to Ford and had to go to the assembly plants during model changes and be there in case there were any assembly issues. At the Ohio plant in Cleveland where they assembled the Econoline van I spent weeks watching them assemble from beginning to end. They would take a grease pencil and write a number, usually where the license plate went, that was the consecutive unit for the day or shift I do not remember which. This was painted and assembled.
I am pretty sure they did it at the T-bird Cougar plant but did not spend much time there. I was only there once because of a complaint of a bent place in one of our parts. When we walked the line the bend was not in the part coming off the rack but was being added by Fords assembly line equipment. So we bought an airline ticket, rental car and hotel room to go show them where they were bending the parts.
Did any of you ever see a number written in the area where your rear license plate goes with grease pencil or marker? That would be the unit number coming off the line for that day or shift I do not remember which.
David
  Reply
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