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Really need some help with Oil Pan Install
#1
Hi guys,

Getting rather frustrated with something that seems so simple. I have read on line about this, but everywhere has a different and often contradicting process.

Trying to install stock oil pan on 351C. I tried the stock cork gaskets and they split. Bought the Milodon crush proof and they split. These were torqed to the low end of the shop manual range.

Can somebody share the process so I DONT get any leaks...looking for which gasket set to use, what sealers, placement of sealers etc.

THANKS SO MUCH
Jeff
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#2
I've gotten away from those gaskets and just used silicone. Not too much so that it gets on everything but a nice bead to do the job.
Good luck.
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#3
i think its impossible for it not to leak Sad

my engine guy squeezed a couple of tubes of sealant then installed the pan. the orange stuff. then he painted over it with the engine color.

It leaked from different areas, and i slathered on sealant in different areas to contain it over the years.
i had one bolt that kept leaking, and i had to keep pulling the bolt and cake frosting it to make it stop.

and it weep leaks from the behind the balancer and from the rear seal, i get a couple drops from time to time.

I gave up basically.

i hear part of the problem is the repop pans are not as thick and as you torque down the lip of the pan bends and causes the leaks.

hopefully somebody will chime in with a better success story.

in a way mine is a success because originally when i stored the car for the winter i would come back and there was 3-4 quarts of oil under the car in a mini lake.
now i get a small wet spot on the cement.
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#4
Make sure the flange around the oil pan has no high or low spots in it. Even the no-crush gaskets can be crushed by an uneven flange.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#5
Wrench 
Jeff8877,
Just some food for thought here, The Canton SBF 351C Four Piece Oil Pan Gasket is designed with a fibrous Compound Rails that should help in torque support for the pan. This might be better.

https://www.cantonracingproducts.com/pro...AN-GASKET/

Also, maybe oil pan stud kit from Canton might help. The studs hold the gasket in place while installing the pan and helps for pan alignment.

https://www.cantonracingproducts.com/pro...-STUD-KIT/

One of the best Books on SB Fords is How to rebuild Ford Engines by Tom Monroe.

http://books.google.com/books?id=teVWlvG...an&f=false

One of the bad areas of leaks is where the Main caps and the two gaskets come together. It is recommended to place some silicone sealer to where the main caps and cylinder blocks meet. You can read this in the link above from the Book.

Lets us know what process has worked for you.

Mustang7173 Big Grin
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#6
Oil pan torque settings should be between 9 and 12 foot pounds. The reason it is often expressed in inch pounds (108 inch pounds is a common oil pan example) is that most ft pound type torque wrenches margin of error at these low settings are too high to be reliable. Error ranges between 2% and 30% can be seen in various brands of torque wrenches and calibration is something that is rarely done enough.

Start with 2 clean and straight surfaces, I like to dry install the pan. The bolt holes should be chased and cleaned before proceeding. The goal here is to see if there are any tight or loose spots that need to be addressed. If you find any warpage correct it and try again. Front and rear seals require inspecting the channels for any type of interference.

During installation, I use sealant sparingly in the corners and to lightly attach the seals on the motor side. I use a single narrow bead on the oil pan side only. My goal is enough to seal any pan imperfections to the gasket, rather than relying upon crush alone to do the job.

Front timing cover seals should get a coating of something before being driven into the front cover. I've used Red Loctite with success as well as nonhardening permatex sealer.

When tightening for the intall I ease all bolts into contact so as to fully bring all surfaces into contact with each other visually. With the exception of the 4 larger corner bolts, everything gets tightened in sequence 1/2 turn at a time without regard to torque (other than if you are having to exert any real effort, you have tightened it too much) until the gasket has been compressed 25% of its original thickness. Rubber gasket materials get more compression at closer to 50%

Oil pan bolts are threaded I believe 20 threads per inch so each 1/2 turn is .025. From contact to compression is usually only 1 full turn or slightly less.

[Image: 1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png]

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!
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#7
Jeff, sorry to hijack your thread.
My Engine was rebuilt 6 years ago and the oil pan doesn't leak but I was going to reseal it. Now i'm wondering if I sould leave it alone. I just thought that becuase the engine out I would just redo the oil pan. Anyone know how long this gaskets can hold up?
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#8
I have had very good luck with the Right Stuff sealant.

GM also makes a sealant which is even better. The guys in the shop where I work swear by it. I can get the part number if anyone is interested. Of course you have to go to your local Chevy dealer to get it.Big Grin

73 conv. 460, D0VE large valve heads, Performer RPM manifold, Voodoo 227/233 cam, Holley 950 HP carb, C6 trans, 3.25 trak-loc.
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#9
One trick I've learned is to start on the center sides, then crisscross to the back and front. Just apply enough force to start to engage the gasket on the first pass, then go less than the minimum torque in that crisscross sequence, then once again to minimum torque.
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#10
I think you have the right advice here. Make sure the flanges are flat on the oil pan, and use a light even torque. It has been forever since I last sealed one, but we used cork gaskets and RTV black in the 80's. They didn't leak with that combo, flat flanges and even torque.

Good luck!
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