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Question for the IT Members
#1
The current computer runs Vista which was the newest MS software
at the time, if that is any indication of its age. For $450 I bought
an HP desktop to replace it running 64 bit Windows 7, 1T drive, 8 gigs
RAM, fast Intel etc. My question is how to transfer all the files on my
old desktop to the new one. I do regular full backups using
Norton 360. I should be able to plug in the backup USB drive and
do a restore; correct? I am computer savy but have never done a
backup/restore.

I think Microsoft should give a 50% discount to anyone who survived
Vista and upgraded.

mike

[Image: 1_11_11_13_11_50_27.png]
  Reply
#2
Pull the hard drive out of your old desktop, put it in your new machine and it'll come up as another drive letter. Copy your important data files straight across to where you want them and leave the drive in as a spare hard drive - do not copy the old Vista OS files to the new drive, as it will mess up the current OS. Just your important stuff (e-mail PST files, contact list, pictures, music, documents, etc.).

You'll need to install the back-up software to the new OS before you're able to do a restore, since it's the application that archives and stores things on the back-up drive. The only problem with that is if your Vista was 32-bit, your new 64-bit OS might not want to run it. Compatibility mode will only run the previous x-bit version - meaning that if your Norton 360 was originally a 16-bit version, it would run on a 32-bit OS... but not a 64-bit OS. I discovered that with an old version of AutoCAD (expensive) that I still use - Win7 64-bit wouldn't run it, but 32-bit would. Guess what I did when I realized that? (reinstalled Win7 as 32-bit, since I don't have many - if any -true 64-bit applications).

Hope that helps. That's the old school way to do it... using a back-up restore program [for me] has always wound up with my scratching my head, pissed off, and formatting my 'back-up' drive eventually.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
  Reply
#3
You can connect it up as a slave drive, as per Eric's suggestion (make sure to run all your A/V and spyware removal tools on said drive before the swap), and copy your files manually.

Alternately, Windows has a built-in backup tool to do the same thing, containing everything on a single file. It works, but I've found these files to be corrupt-prone if dealing with failing or malfunctioning drives. Even if only a few clusters are affected, you can wind up losing more data with the single file backup than if you manually copy-pasted.

At any rate, if you don't want to re-configure your programs when you re-install them on the new machine, navigate to the root folder of your old drive (probably D:\; as the slave drive on the new machine), and navigate to "Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData," where (YourUserFolder) is whatever the name of your user account is.

Copy the Local, LocalLow, and Roaming folders out of AppData, then navigate to the root folder of your new drive (C:\, most likely), and find the same AppData folder.

Backup the Local, LocalLow, and Roaming folders that are in C:\Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData. Once you've done so, copy over the old ones from D:\Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData.

Quite handy if you have a number of saved passwords (a pretty easy security problem, but we'll leave that for another discussion), browser extensions, program settings, etc.

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
  Reply
#4
cudak888;164146 Wrote:You can connect it up as a slave drive, as per Eric's suggestion (make sure to run all your A/V and spyware removal tools on said drive before the swap), and copy your files manually.

Alternately, Windows has a built-in backup tool to do the same thing, containing everything on a single file. It works, but I've found these files to be corrupt-prone if dealing with failing or malfunctioning drives. Even if only a few clusters are affected, you can wind up losing more data with the single file backup than if you manually copy-pasted.

At any rate, if you don't want to re-configure your programs when you re-install them on the new machine, navigate to the root folder of your old drive (probably D:\; as the slave drive on the new machine), and navigate to "Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData," where (YourUserFolder) is whatever the name of your user account is.

Copy the Local, LocalLow, and Roaming folders out of AppData, then navigate to the root folder of your new drive (C:\, most likely), and find the same AppData folder.

Backup the Local, LocalLow, and Roaming folders that are in C:\Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData. Once you've done so, copy over the old ones from D:\Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData.

Quite handy if you have a number of saved passwords (a pretty easy security problem, but we'll leave that for another discussion), browser extensions, program settings, etc.

-Kurt

Kurt....your one sick individual


67 Diamond Blue Vert

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRveIaRU6OAzTfd2Mv6ypG...mJJrHJ_B_Q]

DUDE

LOL even my sig line offended somebody!
  Reply
#5
rpmcarter;164161 Wrote:Kurt....your one sick individual

Deal with enough computers, and you'll be sick too. To your stomach!

Speaking of which, here's one of my own little in-house IT nightmares of recent lore. Ironically enough, it had a bearing on a Mustang purchase:

I spent the better part of two months (notably off and on, I should note) chasing audio driver gremlins in one box that had a dual-boot XP setup. No matter what, XP installation #1 would keep losing audio on restart. Driver files unchanged each restart. No problem on XP installation #2. Both copies of XP were installed on the same HD with two partitions.

No amount of prodding or re-linking .DLL driver files would get the unit to accept either the stock ATI drivers or alternate Omega drivers on XP installation #1; ditto for sound.

Assume possible hardware problem. Install PCI soundcard to work around on-board motherboard sound. Works for one install, loses its driver on restart, XP #2 is fine. Install alternate PCI sound card. Same story. Examine board, find three bulged capacitors.

I got a good used Asus P5B board as a replacement, and ditched the old PCI sound cards for a spare PCI-E SoundBlaster I had sitting around here.

Get it all built up, and it won't start. Tore it out of the tower and stripped it down for an on-the-mobo-box test. Everything points to the 500W Cooler Master power supply, which was working fine two days ago. Perform paper-clip power supply test. Dead. Try neighbor's spare server power supply with the proper 24-pin power connector. Fans spin up, and the board posts without issue.

Buy new Cooler Master 500W power supply. This time, spend the $11 extra for the one that's identical to the old one, but with the 5-year warranty. Go home, install PSU. Board POSTs. Put the mobo and PCB's back in the tower.

Stick the XP CD in after rebuild, and let it reinstall the drivers. Works for now, but XP #1 now won't update its ATI drivers.

Fiddle with every driver install trick. No dice. I pulled the box's ATI Radeon 4000-series graphics card out, and replaced it with an ATI Radeon 2000-series card. No difference.

In the meantime, notice that the 4000-series card is unreasonably hot. Examine fan. Fan hasn't been spinning. Card is burning itself up, and the fan isn't replaceable. 2000-series card becomes permanent.

I ran AVG A/V Free on XP #1, which gave a report of a rootkit in one of the ATI .DLL driver files. Ran GMER to check for the rootkit, and found nothing odd in the results, other that the ATI driver had been changed. I checked it against a known good file, and found the problem file to be 1/4 the size. Removed it and installed the good file.

Problem solved, but I found another troublesome driver and a few corrupt files in the meantime. Ran chkdsk, and got tons of cluster errors - drive was dying. Backed it all up on two other drives, and pulled the HD.

Time to pull out a reconditioned spare drive. Didn't have time to slipstream SP3, so I pulled out my OEM XP SP2 disk and loaded it up on a spare drive that I had wiped of formatting.

XP doesn't install right. Turns out the Seagate drive (pulled from a used ACER) has a custom MBR that doesn't want to go away.

Start a Ubuntu Live disk. Use DD to nuke the MBR. Close Ubuntu. Start up XP install again. Get XP installed. Begin installing drivers.

ATI doesn't want to behave. Again. On the clean installation. Try Omega drivers. Nada. Assume installation did not go right. Repair install. Same thing.

On assumption the MBR was still giving trouble, I pulled out another spare drive, prepped it, and installed OEM XP. Same thing.

Check the System32\Drivers folder, find the ATI drivers corrupt again. Strange - it is a replacement drive and a new XP install from an OEM CD on a computer with a replacement known-good mobo with a different video and sound card than it started out with. In short, the new box hardly has a single relation to the problem child that I started with.

I pulled out my hair, took a deep breath, and reasoned that the only problem at this point was that the OEM XP SP2 CD had to be corrupt.

Since the computer had to be pressed back in service for a few hours, I connected the old failing drive back onto it, and booted into the good XP #2 install until I could get back to it.

Came back, wiped the Seagate ACER-sourced drive squeaky clean, pulled out a black-market XP SP2 CD, ran an install. All drivers installed without the slightest issue.

Conclusion? OEM CD is bad.

More parts - get another OEM CD, install XP, install drivers, install programs, clean up a spare WD 1TB drive for the user's mess of old files.

Proceed to re-load user's files from XP backup. Find out that it's partially corrupted due to being backed-up from before I knew said drive was failing.

Oh, joy.

Well, everything that matters is OK. Recover the corrupted bits from other backups, dump everything in the freakin' trash bin that the WD 1TB drive is becoming.

Try to pull the AppData folder from the half-corrupt XP backup. It works. Dump it in the new directory. Firefox has all its extensions, and everything else works.

Yippee! It's done - just have to run some Windows Updates.

Load MSIE Windows Updates. Get error.

Find Fix-It from M$ on website. Download Fix-It, because there's no way in hell I'm running a rustload of CMD commands at this point. Find out Fix-It installer requires SP3.

Download SP3. Install. Run Fix-It.

Windows Update works. Run Windows Update. Finish updates.

Done. Heck, all I had to do was move mountains...

^
So what did that have to do with a Mustang? Well, not long ago, I posted about an overpriced - but very unusual - Q-code 4-speed coupe that I located. Price: $5,500, with ~$700 of NOS parts with it. Total outlay, $4,800 for a toploader coupe with a rusty trunk, rusty fenders, rusty aprons, and a Q-code engine with too-low Hooker headers, a Accel dizzy and coil, and a Holley perched above an Edlebrock Torker manifold. About $1,800 out of line, if not more - Q-code 4-speed drivetrain or not.

I almost went for it, BUT the owner had three conditions...one of which was that I take care of his occasional computer issues. Particularly when his 14-year-old stepdaughter would screw up their laptop.

He presented that condition to me at the same time I was dealing with the computer box listed above.

NO. Not even for a Boss 351 or a 429 SCJ. Never.

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
  Reply
#6
Oh yeah... using Ubuntu's Disk Doctor to nuke the MBR - classic!

I hadn't thought about copying the AppData straight over - I usually just take the clean OS as an opportunity to get rid of unused things by just not reinstalling them. Good tip, though. thumb

My wife is still using XP SP3, because reloading all of her WoW and Sims 3 patches, scenarios, saved game data, and D/Ls would take days. Not to mention she absolutely hates Win 8 that came on her new laptop.

XP VLK 6-in-1 CD? Gotta love it. rofl

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
  Reply
#7
I use reboot a lot to solve my computer problems if that doesn't work I need to call someone.

Jim

Jim

M code 71 Mach 1, 351 4V Cleveland, Ram Air (not factory), C6 Trans, 3.5 rear
  Reply
#8
Mister 4x4;164171 Wrote:XP VLK 6-in-1 CD? Gotta love it. rofl

It's not the 6-in-1, but it was enough to tell me that the OEM disc was screwed up.

The thing that really ticks me is that I'm the only person to have ever touched that disc. Never abused and never kept in anything but a case. Not used that frequently either, as I had a thing for the XP x64 Pro disc that came in the same student pack.

And, at the end of the day, I would probably have been better off starting with the warez CD in the first place - better quality!

I can't wait for the day when Microsoft screws up Windows at the very time someone launches the ideal replacement. By that, I don't mean too-smart-for-its-own-good Linux forks or the anti-tech-yet-marketed-as-geeky OS-X crap either.

Wouldn't mind seeing the ReactOS project get off the ground, for once.

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
  Reply
#9
cudak888;164146 Wrote:At any rate, if you don't want to re-configure your programs when you re-install them on the new machine, navigate to the root folder of your old drive (probably D:\; as the slave drive on the new machine), and navigate to "Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData," where (YourUserFolder) is whatever the name of your user account is.

Copy the Local, LocalLow, and Roaming folders out of AppData, then navigate to the root folder of your new drive (C:\, most likely), and find the same AppData folder.

Backup the Local, LocalLow, and Roaming folders that are in C:\Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData. Once you've done so, copy over the old ones from D:\Users\(YourUserFolder)\AppData.

Quite handy if you have a number of saved passwords (a pretty easy security problem, but we'll leave that for another discussion), browser extensions, program settings, etc.

-Kurt

Ok, that was easy enough. Good suggestion. I use Norton for my
backup.

mike
  Reply
#10
Man, I really envy people that can speak foreign languages. Big Grin

Doc

[Image: 6y14ea.jpg]

Project started 8-7-10
Completed: All new suspension, rebuilt 351C H Code bored .030 over with mild cam and intake, new 3.50 TracLok, custom exhaust system
Current "mini-project": interior upgrade Undecided
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