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New garage
#1
I almost dont know where to start. I have decided at 58 I am going to spoil myself and build a garage to really work on stuff. I want a lift, I want a heated floor (I live in upstate NY with long winters). I have some land restrictions because I live in residential neighborhood and have zoning. My current "old garage" is on 24w x 19 deep. Its not worth fixing. I have the cash to do it right. Id like to tear it down and start over with poured concrete floor and the drive up to it will be concrete. I can do in floor radiant heat. Because of zoning, I will be lucky to get 24x24 when done or maybe 24W x 32 deep with a variance. But I am set on a lift of why bother. I have done lots of reading on all styles of lifts to get up to speed. The fact that I havent built garage gives me too many options to figure out where to start. So I'd like a 24' wide 2 car garage with a large or oversized single door. I envision a lift on one side, I dont care, left or right. To me, seems like a 4 post would offer up advantage of having a larger car collection as you can park one on top and drive under it. What advice would you give if theres limitation on say 24' wide (zoning) and a lift?  So I need high side walls correct? Instead of standard 8' I need 12? I dont even mind that if its so high I get storage over the top. I am basically looking at wood frame construction with white vinyl siding so it matches my house, and metal roofing. Its Northeast NY so high pitch roof is good for snow load.
I really dont know how to design it to start. I looked at prefab metal kits but I want to heat this too and with all metal construction I am wondering about insulation etc.  I know and trust the brain trust here much more then I do general contractors. You guys get it when it comes to working on cars.
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#2
I'll start by saying GOOD FOR YOU! If you can spare the money, why not. If not now, when? Life is a short ride. The zoning restrictions sound ridiculously restrictive to me. I'd pursue the largest variance you can get and secure that before finalizing any plans. I used a 5 inch pour, 4000lb. concrete with steel reinforcement. I'm sure there is a way to do that with the radiant heat. You do need 11" 5" walls as a minimum, 15' would give a loft above if desired. If you use 10' or more on the walls, I'd use 2"x6" exterior wall studs. You could do a"high and low" staggered ceiling height and have useable space above on part of the garage. For the single large door make sure the reinforcement is over built and extends laterally way beyond the opening to prevent any sagging in the middle of the door opening. Don't skimp on insulation and air infiltration prevention. Use low-e glass for the windows even if it is an aluminum framed window. Plan on a 200 AMP box with surge suppression as well as at least 2 or 3 240VAC outlets for a large compressor, welder, and a possible AC unit (it makes working in the summer months pleasant). At a minimum plan on a couple of fans to move some air. Don't skimp on lighting, you'll be retrofitting later if you do (ask me how I know).
As far as a lift, if I had to choose a single lift it would be a 4 post drive on. With a sliding jack tray, a bottle jack, appropriate jack stands, and the smallest floor jack you can find, you can do almost anything. The two post, swivel arm lifts take up to much width space and requires careful attention to weight and balance. Spend the time researching and planning the build, it will pay off when completed. Happy building. Chuck
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#3
If your building code will allow you to use rafters instead of trusses you can gain ceiling height. Also plan ahead for footers if need them for your lift. I'm in a similar place. At 58 I tore down my 25 year workshop and built a new house where it was. Now moved in but not starting on the detached garage untill my 71 is finished. You may also look into a tray or vaulted ceiling. Depending on your house 12' walls may look out of proportion to it. I was wanting to turn the old house into a garage. That idea didn't fly!
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#4
(09-03-2018, 06:01 PM)c9zx Wrote: I'll start by saying GOOD FOR YOU! If you can spare the money, why not. If not now, when? Life is a short ride. The zoning restrictions sound ridiculously restrictive to me. I'd pursue the largest variance you can get and secure that before finalizing any plans. I used a 5 inch pour, 4000lb. concrete with steel reinforcement. I'm sure there is a way to do that with the radiant heat. You do need 11" 5" walls as a minimum, 15' would give a loft above if desired. If you use 10' or more on the walls, I'd use 2"x6" exterior wall studs. You could do a"high and low" staggered ceiling height and have useable space above on part of the garage. For the single large door make sure the reinforcement is over built and extends laterally way beyond the opening to prevent any sagging in the middle of the door opening. Don't skimp on insulation and air infiltration prevention. Use low-e glass for the windows even if it is an aluminum framed window. Plan on a 200 AMP box with surge suppression as well as at least 2 or 3 240VAC outlets for a large compressor, welder, and a possible AC unit (it makes working in the summer months pleasant). At a minimum plan on a couple of fans to move some air. Don't skimp on lighting, you'll be retrofitting later if you do (ask me how I know).
As far as a lift, if I had to choose a single lift it would be a 4 post drive on. With a sliding jack tray, a bottle jack, appropriate jack stands, and the smallest floor jack you can find, you can do almost anything. The two post, swivel arm lifts take up to much width space and requires careful attention to weight and balance. Spend the time researching and planning the build, it will pay off when completed. Happy building. Chuck

Thats so much Chuck! I will print this off and talk it over with the builders. You are spot, I have spent my whole life saving up money and I realized I am not having any fun with it, might as well spend it on something i enjoy.
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#5
Indeed, good on ya for building your garage! Why wait?

Good luck!
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#6
In case you haven't seen this site:

https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/
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#7
Go for the 24X32 if you can swing it. 24x24 is almost too small to be serious about working on a vehicle and storing a car. A friend's is 22X34 and it's a great size. 32 deep would even allow a normal 2 door front or large single, and a roll up side entrance door in the rear.


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#8
i totally agree and build the biggest code will allow. and ck with coding folks before u dive in.. here in northern delaware we have a stupid law. 1 1/2 ac land build as high as u want. over 1 1/2 ac u can only build as tall as your house. i have a ranch and 2+ ac and was floored when the code guy told me of size. so i did a 24x40ft with a 12x14 attached shed to store heavy gear in. mine is a pole bld and it cost "total" 10k about 10 yrs ago
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#9
Have been typing for 45 min. and boom message just went away. I will do again tomorrow in word document so it does not go away. I did 4,000 sq. ft. at 68 years so you are ahead of me.
Wish I had done 5,000. So look for tomorrow. I prefer 2 post lift but understand when space is tight how the 4 post helps. I see a four post as something you park your car on so you can jack it up, lol. If space is tight put in a pit with a cover much easier and less cost. How many oil change places do you see with lifts?
Will get lots of info tomorrow. Here are a couple of pics during build.
Cheers,

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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
Tongue
David
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#10
When I built mine, the biggest I could go was 24x30, with 8-foot walls. Strange zoning requirements. The set-backs are based on wall heights and to go any taller would have required me to have larger set-backs from the side and back property lines, which would have put it too close to the house, for future plans with our lot. The 24x30 size is nice, though. Plenty of room in the front and back of the car for working on it, pulling the engine, and so on.

I put in one 30 amp 240 volt outlet and one 20 volt 240 volt outlet, and 120 volt outlets every 10 feet, 3.5 feet above the floor. Three rows of 4-foot florescent lights, six 2-tube fixtures in each row, one down the center and the other two are 2-feet from the side walls.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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