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Need help with engine wiring harness??...
#1
The round white plug that is red and yellow hash marked was said in another thread that it is the carb solenoid??... well I have a holley 4160 with electric choke and the person before me had a red jumper type wire comming off of the starter silenoid going to the electric choke??... is that red and yellow hash marked wire with the white plug by the fire wall supposed to plug into the electric choke or both the jumper off the starter silenoid and the red and yellow hash marked wire supposed to be plugged into the eletric choke or am I able to delete the jumper and just use the red and yellow hash marked wire only??... im a begginer and really confused to whether or not the person before me just rigged something or actually had it wired up right??... because I want it to just be right??... any help would be greatly appreciated... thanks...
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#2
The carburetor solenoid is/was used for 2 purposes, to bump up the idle speed when the AC is on or to close the throttle plate to prevent "dieseling" after the key is turned off. The choke heater wire needs to be connected to a key on 12 volt power source (not the coil).



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#3
Don C;103770 Wrote:The carburetor solenoid is/was used for 2 purposes, to bump up the idle speed when the AC is on or to close the throttle plate to prevent "dieseling" after the key is turned off. The choke heater wire needs to be connected to a key on 12 volt power source (not the coil).

So what would be the best way to hook it up??... or should I just leave it unplugged??...
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#4
The Mustangs that were equipped with electric chokes typically used a white/black wire that was connected from the back of the alternator to the choke. The red/yellow hash wire that was used for the solenoid should be a key switched 12 volt source that runs through a 14 amp fuse, which should be adequate for the choke. I would double check it to make sure that it does supply 12 volts when the key is on, and only when the key is on.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#5
Ok... so your saying it should supply 12v when the key is on... but not when running??...
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#6
If you connect it to the red/yellow hash it should have 12 volts with the key on and running or not running. If connected to the alternator (white/black wire) you will have 12 volts only with engine running.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#7
But I wouldnt want power to the electric choke all the time right??... only to start right??... or do I have the completely wrong idea??...

But I wouldnt want power to the electric choke all the time right??... only to start right??... or do I have the completely wrong idea??...
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#8
The thermostatic winding ('spring') in the electric choke will uncoil as it warms (since metal expands when it's warm, contracts as it cools), which will keep the choke opened while running. As it cools, it will coil up tighter, closing the choke butterfly. Ideally, the spring will keep the choke closed while it's cool (engine off, and during cold temperature operation), which is why the housing assembly is adjustable by rotating it until you find the 'sweet spot' where the winding will just keep the butterfly closed when it's cool (less than 65-ish, I would say). Having power running through it as the key is on and while running is necessary to keep the choke 'spring' warm enough to stay open while the engine is running. Totally old school technology here.

I hope that makes sense.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#9
I think what the original poster was asking is if he leaves the key in the RUN position but the car not running, the choke will still get its power. Most choke signals come from a female bullet plug off of the Voltage Regulator (Green/red wire) that is hot only when the key is in the RUN position. One should never put the key in the RUN position without starting the car first, or you are trouble-shooting that particular signal line. You can damage the points and possibly the coil if you do. Otherwise, all other functions are available in the ACC key position.
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#10
I think a little choke theory might help. I apologize in advance, this turned out to longer than I originally intended. If anyone notices any errors, please let me know. When the weather and engine is cold an engine needs extra fuel to be able to start and run, due to a combination of gasoline not atomizing well at lower temperatures, fuel condensing on the walls of the intake manifold, and because cold air is denser and requires more fuel to reach the fuel/air ratio needed to ignite in the engine.
The choke increases the vacuum above the throttle plate, pulling extra fuel from the venturi discharge nozzles.
Early cars had manual chokes, then came the automatic chokes, originally operated by exhaust heat, either from the exhaust manifold or from the exhaust crossover in the intake manifold. A bi-metal spring in the choke housing was warmed by pulling air from around the exhaust manifold or from the intake crossover through the choke housing. These chokes were prone to sticking and required a fair amount of maintenance, due to both exposed linkages and the debris being sucked through the choke mechanism. The electric choke doesn't require heated air to be drawn through the choke housing, thus eliminating one source of problems, by heating the bi-metal spring with an electric heating element. Chokes also bump up the idle speed during the warm up period. The speed that the choke opens up at is self regulated, the colder the atmosphere/engine is the longer it takes for the automatic choke to open. However, all parts must be operating correctly, the proper amount of air being drawn through the exhaust heated ones, and the proper voltage and current being applied to the electric ones. Proper operation must be maintained after the engine is running and warmed up to keep the choke from closing with a warm engine.
After the engine starts less additional fuel is required and the choke butterfly opens a little to decrease the vacuum above the throttle plates. The choke plates opens by one of three ways, the choke plate pivot being offset, a manifold vacuum operated piston, or a manifold vacuum operated diaphragm. Also, to help free up a stuck choke and to have a way to start a flooded engine a mechanical "dechoke" opened the choke plate a little when the throttle plates were fully opened.
Most of the operating parts are exposed and prone to collecting dirt and corrosion, thus still prone to sticking. Many of us still prefer manual chokes, and back in the 60's and 70's manual choke conversions were readily available to eliminate the automatic chokes.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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