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my boredom lead to ebay
#1
which lead to some fairly decent finds. the first looks like a pretty good deal, price is low and car sounds to be in fair shape, but i guess you never know until you see it.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Mustang-mac...ars_Trucks
the next one is not bad either. Q code with a 4 speed and 2 owner car.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Mustang-Del...ars_Trucks
and the last is a pretty nice convertible, i think its overpriced, unless it really is 1 of 1, but not with that paint job.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Mustang-Con...ars_Trucks
i wish i had 100 million bucks, i would buy every last 71-73 mustang i could find and restore them all. Smile .... although i might need 100 trillion to do them all.

<img src="http://www.7173mustangs.com/gallery/1_12_09_14_10_32_45.png" />

- Nik
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#2
#2 would be an interesting car if the price was right. Who knows what reserve is set at.
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#3
#1: Quarters have spot rust and the trunk has been replaced and isn't closed completely. Assume trunk floor to be rough if not rotted.

#2: Very rare to see '72 Sportsroofs/Mach 1s with vinyl ('71s had the smallest production numbers though), but don't let that trunk floor or their description fool you - this car is significantly rotted from the bottom up. Look at the doors in the jambs. There will be a LOT of painfully irritating rust areas to fix on this car which may require removal of some GOOD steel. I am willing to bet that the torque boxes have holes in them.

Honestly, I'd try my luck with the red one before this, even though this appears better on the surface. Rule #1: When you have to strip them down to fix them, the beauty factor at the point of purchase is of no consequence.

#3: Soapbox mode is on for this one: $33,000 samolians for a H-code convertible...

...with a driver's door that's even with the quarter at the top but sticks out 1/2" at the bottom
...a poor stripe kit with the wrong taper and shape
...standard hood with non-original bush - ahem - tu-tone blackout
...lower blackout missing its pinstripe
...body-color cowl and hood hinges (did they paint the hood with the hinges attached?)
...Boss 351 cowcatcher spoiler on a car that's being sold as a 1-of-1
...the beautiful tri-spoke rim blow steering wheel listed in the Marti is gone
...and the Mustang lettering is missing off the repro trunk lid?

All completely ignored on a car who's sales price is being justified by virtue of being a factory 1-of-1. Though that is true, it's not a strong sales point anymore - and even the AM/FM radio that makes it a "1 of 1" isn't present anymore - and even that is a poor justifier for value. Given the breakdown of that Marti, this is closer to a 1-of-17 for the paint/trim combo.

The funniest thing about it is that it's a fleet order. When I see a $33,000 rental car, I want to see "Shelby GT350H" written on the sides of it, thank you very much.

The seller's sales pitch has to be chock full of every classic car seller cliche in the book too. If you fellows will excuse me, it's a bit late here, and I feel ready for some Art Fern one-liners for amusement:

seller Wrote:AS THE MARTI REPORTS DOCUMENT THIS CAR WAS 1 OF 1 BUILT WHICH MAKES IT VERY RARE.
...which, in other words, means: "This is a unique car because it is unique!" Obvious point is obvious! Logically speaking, he means to say "this car was 1-of-1 built, which makes it very desirable," but unfortunately for him (and the other half-million flippers of various collectables out there), "rare" and "desirable" are not synonyms.

seller Wrote:All of the gauges work except the clock.
Buddy, for $33k, I want to see that clock ticking along with the crisp regularity of a Chevrolet's lifters.

seller Wrote:The firewall is smooth and the inner fenders are beautiful.
Huh? I thought we were talking about a Mustang here. Tongue

seller Wrote:The body is in beautiful condition with a straight body and nice gaps!
Why, oh why didn't he photograph this car with a model? I could have had so much fun with this without resorting to mundane complaining about the driver's door gap. rofl

seller Wrote:As the Deluxe Mart Report documents here’s a breakdown of the VIN NUMBER:
Ah, yes. Whenever I want to save money, I get a report from my Mustang at the Deluxe Mart Auto Stripmall. And the base model strippers have straight bodies and nice gaps too!

Gag mission accomplished.

seller Wrote:1971-1972 Mustangs are becoming very collectable and prices are on the rise!
Starting with the rise in price with this one! And don't buy those non-collectable, valueless 1973 models!

seller Wrote:Over the years I've noticed that the extremely detailed classic cars have always commanded a higher price.
"I also have acquired and detailed a lot of inventory over the years."

seller Wrote:I WOULD CHALLENGE ANYONE TO FIND A COMPARABLE VEHICLE FOR LESS.
Challenge accepted! Do you accept daring wagers?

Ah, that felt good!

Let me say this in closing: Don't get me wrong - this is not to say that I don't care for any of these cars. Whoever winds up with them in the future should be proud of them. It's the seller of the silver convertible that peeves me. It's an outrageous price for an average convertible with a nice restoration, but there are more than a few issues that completely negate his claims of perfection. It's nice, but not nice enough, and certainly not "$33k nice."

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
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#4
Kurt -

Smile

Thanks for the smile.

Doc

[Image: 6y14ea.jpg]

Project started 8-7-10
Completed: All new suspension, rebuilt 351C H Code bored .030 over with mild cam and intake, new 3.50 TracLok, custom exhaust system
Current "mini-project": interior upgrade Undecided
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#5
Guys,
One of my non-car buddies went and looked @ the 71 convertible up in MA this week. He was a little disappointed in the way the car actually looked and was put together. The door fit was a huge issue upon inspection. The car didn't seem to be "sorted out" and wandered on the road. The dealer stated he turned down 30K and was looking for 31 or 32K. This buddy attended the Mecum auction with me last weekend and was very surprised on the actual cost of muscle cars. I found it difficult to explain to him that a majority of the cars at the auction were, as I call it " a turd rolled in glitter". If he came home last week with a 69 Mach 1 he bid up to 30K, without my blessing, he surely would have been disappointed afterward. He is still searching for his dream car and I will help as much as I can so he doesn't get the short end of the stick !!! You just cannot rush into these things as we all know.
Thanks, Jay
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#6
cuda, I always respect your attention to detail. And I cannot disagree with your assessment and analysis of this listing.

However, if I was to do a full blown restoration on a similar car (say a Q code Mach 1). I would have to say that I could end up spending this amount of money in parts and time. And I will probably be forced to make consessions (like a substitute steering wheel). Would I pay $33k for essentially a new car (even with the oddities noted), yes if I could afford it. I read over and over on this site and others, "buy one already done and you will save money!" If this car sells for the $33k (or $31k noted above), would not the buyer be happy to have a cool car that he can drive away in and enjoy?
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#7
71_resurrection;190335 Wrote:which lead to some fairly decent finds. the first looks like a pretty good deal, price is low and car sounds to be in fair shape, but i guess you never know until you see it.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Mustang-mac...ars_Trucks
the next one is not bad either. Q code with a 4 speed and 2 owner car.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Mustang-Del...ars_Trucks
and the last is a pretty nice convertible, i think its overpriced, unless it really is 1 of 1, but not with that paint job.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ford-Mustang-Con...ars_Trucks
i wish i had 100 million bucks, i would buy every last 71-73 mustang i could find and restore them all. Smile .... although i might need 100 trillion to do them all.

1973grandeklar;190399 Wrote:cuda, I always respect your attention to detail. And I cannot disagree with your assessment and analysis of this listing.

However, if I was to do a full blown restoration on a similar car (say a Q code Mach 1). I would have to say that I could end up spending this amount of money in parts and time. And I will probably be forced to make consessions (like a substitute steering wheel). Would I pay $33k for essentially a new car (even with the oddities noted), yes if I could afford it. I read over and over on this site and others, "buy one already done and you will save money!" If this car sells for the $33k (or $31k noted above), would not the buyer be happy to have a cool car that he can drive away in and enjoy?

Not trying to speak for Kurt but it all depends on what the buyer expects for his money. If, on the odd chance, a buyer doesn't like the original rim-blow wheel and prefers another steering wheel that just happens to be already on the car - well that buyer is happy. I'd say most would like the rim blow for that selling price. From what I have seen, "buyers that can afford it" expect the cars to be ultra nice and see signs of someone putting a lot of attention to the details to make them nice. For car with the big price tags, buyers need to see tastefull application of time and/or money. If not value always suffers and vice versa Smile . Kurt has just pointed out some of the things that naturally effect value.

Ray

1971 Boss 351  
1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 
1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 
1973 Mach 1 (parts car)
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#8
Boss1Ray;190403 Wrote:Not trying to speak for Kurt but it all depends on what the buyer expects for his money. If, on the odd chance, a buyer doesn't like the original rim-blow wheel and prefers another steering wheel that just happens to be already on the car - well that buyer is happy. I'd say most would like the rim blow for that selling price. From what I have seen, "buyers that can afford it" expect the cars to be ultra nice and see signs of someone putting a lot of attention to the details to make them nice. For car with the big price tags, buyers need to see tastefull application of time and/or money. If not value always suffers and vice versa Smile . Kurt has just pointed out some of the things that naturally effect value.

Ray

What I was trying to say Ray, is if I wanted to buy a new muscle car, this one sure appears to be completely new-like. It is not factory and that is what i really like about cuda's attention to detail. Way better at spotting things like that than most people I have seen.
Me if I had the money, I would probably go get a new 2015 muscle car. But if someone wanted a vintage like new car, this convertible sure looks solid even with the details pointed out. Now if this were a Boss or HO, detail does matter. Just my thoughts on this. In the end, the seller and the buyer are that counts.
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#9
Whew, and with that I will NEVER EVER EVER EVER... EVER, post a picture of my car here.
  Reply
#10
1973grandeklar;190399 Wrote:cuda, I always respect your attention to detail. And I cannot disagree with your assessment and analysis of this listing.

However, if I was to do a full blown restoration on a similar car (say a Q code Mach 1). I would have to say that I could end up spending this amount of money in parts and time.

But when superior restorations on cars with intrinsically higher values can be bought for less, it is ridiculous to buy the less-valuable H-code for a premium.
These cars prove that much better deals are to be had.

Heck, the seller of the silver car doesn't even disclose the mileage of the car prior to the engine rebuild and resto - only that it has 4,038 miles now.

And how much was the last reported sale price of one of the 13 R-code convertibles? I believe it was one of our members. Wasn't over $35k, IIRC.

-Kurt


1972MustangSVH;190432 Wrote:Whew, and with that I will NEVER EVER EVER EVER... EVER, post a picture of my car here.

Rule #1: Here at the forum, every member's car is respected and loved, no matter what the condition. We own them because we like them, not because we want to make a killing on them. (FYI, I don't expect my own cars to come anywhere near the quality of any full-blown restoration, and I'm not embarrassed about it - I just wouldn't go out and ask $30k for either and claim perfection).
Rule #2: When dealers and sellers put a car up for sale with undisclosed issues and/or a shady description, all constructive criticism and disclosure by experts should be encouraged.

Look at the crazy frenzy that is the muscle car market. Low quality restorations bringing unreasonable prices at auction - and on eBay - by savvy sellers with knowledge of how to throw together a car quick enough to make a killing on an unsuspecting buyer. You hear about the sales all the time, but what you don't hear are the stories of disappointment that these buyers experience after getting shafted.

The result? A great many people with misplaced beliefs that classic cars are junk, no matter how much money you spend in them. This does not help spread the hobby or love for old cars, and sends the wrong message (ironically enough, it sends this message to the people who have the disposable income to collect restored cars to begin with - thereby killing off a strong new market at the same time!).

Yes, classic cars can be a chore, but they should never be a nightmare if you spend a premium for what is sold to you as a quality restoration. Sure, you can buy a rare car that's an expensive basket case, but you should be fully aware of that too. Never should anyone have to pay premium for an average car that is a basket case - the only way to do that is to be a flagrant idiot or be duped by an untrustworthy seller.

Clevelandcoupe's story is a perfect example. Can you imagine what his well-intentioned - but uninformed - friend would have thought if he had bought that '69 Mach?

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
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