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My 1972 is having problems :(
#1
I'm a 22 year old female. No idea about engines and all that. Recently bought a 1972 Mustang 351 convertible, bought it with my heart rather than my head. First day out in it today and it broke on me. The recovery man had to transport it home for me. It's hard to describe what's wrong with it because I don't have much of a clue. But when it's in drive and I'm stationary (or is it idle?) you can hear the engine wanting to cut off. I can feel something juddering. I'm thinking something's wrong with the carb? And if I stopped at a junction the car would stop completely. Only way I could keep it going was to put one foot on the brake and use the other to rev it until I could start driving again. Then near home the car finally gave up the ghost. I just want an idea of what's wrong before I get a mechanic out because I don't want him to rip me off.
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#2
Hi, welcome to the site and very sorry to hear about your bad start! Please don't let it get you down coz you've got something awesome to drive in :-)
Your problems could have a lot of causes as many will probably point out. It sou ds like carb/ignition timing issues. If it's just troublesome when idling then maybe your idle mixture at the carb needs to be adjusted.
Good luck!
Vincent.
PS: we always like to see pics of your pony :-)
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#3
dHi and welcome to the forum. I am sorry you are having issues with your car. It will be a great car to learn on.

Your immediate problem sounds very much like a vacuum leak.

Some basics: Your engine is basically a big air pump. The pistons go down and air is drawn into the cylinder. It's actually 'pushed' in by the higher outside pressure but you get the idea.
The carburetor is where the air/fuel gets combined. That's a good subject for another day. At idle the carburetor is almost completly closed. Just a small amount of air is allowed to pass by. The air draws in a bit of fuel from the 'idle' circuit. But the other result is the area past the carburetor has a low pressure or vacuum. The engine is trying to pull more air in than the carburetor will allow. This is normal. This normal vacuum is also used for a variety of purposes from assisting in the brakes to pulling crank case gasses.

Sometimes there is a vacuum leak. Air is drawn in from somewhere other than the carburetor. This causes the carburetor to add less fuel than normal AND there is more air than normal as well. When this happens the air and fuel mixture is not at the right ratio and the engine will not 'fire'. There is a fairly small range where the ratio of fuel and air is correct and a spark from the spark plug will allow a small explosion in the cylinder. This small explosion causes a very quick expansion of the air/fuel and 'pushes' the piston down.

The reason a car can run with a bit of pressure on the gas pedal when there is a vacuum leak is the extra amount of air that is allow to pass helps counteract the vacuum leak.

Does your car make a 'hissing' or 'whistling' sound? Take a look at all of the rubber hoses. Do any appear to be disconnected or cracked? This is where I would start.

And you made a great choice finding this site. We are happy to help all new enthusiests including the young and females. There isn't anything about cars a girl can't learn.

'Mike'
73 Convertible - 351C/4V CC heads/4bolt/forged flat tops/comp 270/rhodes/mallory unilite/tri-power/hookers/glasspacks/c6/3.50 limited slip/Gear Vendors/Global West sub frames, strut rods and shelby style traction bars/ Rear sway bar/tilt steering (not original)

Pics of modifications included in:
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#4
Welcome from Oklahoma. I'm glad to hear from a woman that is interested in old American iron, I don't see much of that anymore. As others have said, it is likely ignition or fuel delivery related (points, timing, carb adjustment/carb problem). I understand your concern about being ripped off. Between ignorance, incompetence, and dishonesty it is hard to find someone who can and will do quality work at a fair price. Do you have any relatives or friends that have automotive ability and that you trust? Is there a Vo-Tech near you that has an automotive program? Is there aa old American car club, or Mustang club near you? All could be possible sources of help. I hope you get it sorted out. Let us know how it goes. Chuck
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#5
Hi and welcome. Just an fyi.. Never buy a car without a prior inspection by a gear head who knows the vehicle.. Most modern day technicians are certified, but many have no idea how a 44 year old car should perform.. That being said, seek out a tech who knows these cars so you won't get ripped off while he / she is getting an education at your expense..

The information you gave us leans toward a vacuum leak. These cars needed regular tune-ups about every 10 - 12 thousand miles, so it may be time for one.. It would include plugs, points, fuel, air and ccv filters, pcv valve, ignition timing and carburetor setup. Another aspect of poor performance on these engines is a stretched timing chain, worn camshafts or valves. You should also pour some gas treatment in the tank to dry up any moisture that may be in the system..

Best of luck and let us look at some pictures of your Stang!!

The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it. 
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#6
Welcome from Perth, Australia.

There is bound to be a local mechanic that specialises in vintage Fords and if you have a Cleveland engine there is probably a local mechanic that is familiar with Clevelands. We also have quite a few members from the UK on this forum that may be able to recommend an able mechanic obviously depending on your location. I'd even try contacting the DeTomaso club as there appears to be quite a few Cleveland sporting Pantera boffins in the UK.

Without being too specific, what is your rough location? Maybe someone close to you could chime in.

Cheers...

...Mickus
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#7
The MOCGB (Mustang Owners Club of Great Britan)would be a great place to subscribe to. They would be a much better local resource for you to get done what needs doing.

I would try and find a very small garage in an industrial estate and see if they will help you. Those small guys will usually go over and above towards fixing a classic car, and will know their way around older cars very well.

Mike
__________________________________
Black 1985 GT
Yellow 1973 Mustang Mach 1
Black 2012 5.0 GT, 6-speed, Brembo brakes, 3.73's
Wimbledon White 1966 F-100 Shortbed Styleside, 390ci, Tremec 3550, FiTech EFI
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#8
will e;282844 Wrote:dHi and welcome to the forum. I am sorry you are having issues with your car. It will be a great car to learn on.

Your immediate problem sounds very much like a vacuum leak.

Some basics: Your engine is basically a big air pump. The pistons go down and air is drawn into the cylinder. It's actually 'pushed' in by the higher outside pressure but you get the idea.
The carburetor is where the air/fuel gets combined. That's a good subject for another day. At idle the carburetor is almost completly closed. Just a small amount of air is allowed to pass by. The air draws in a bit of fuel from the 'idle' circuit. But the other result is the area past the carburetor has a low pressure or vacuum. The engine is trying to pull more air in than the carburetor will allow. This is normal. This normal vacuum is also used for a variety of purposes from assisting in the brakes to pulling crank case gasses.

Sometimes there is a vacuum leak. Air is drawn in from somewhere other than the carburetor. This causes the carburetor to add less fuel than normal AND there is more air than normal as well. When this happens the air and fuel mixture is not at the right ratio and the engine will not 'fire'. There is a fairly small range where the ratio of fuel and air is correct and a spark from the spark plug will allow a small explosion in the cylinder. This small explosion causes a very quick expansion of the air/fuel and 'pushes' the piston down.

The reason a car can run with a bit of pressure on the gas pedal when there is a vacuum leak is the extra amount of air that is allow to pass helps counteract the vacuum leak.

Does your car make a 'hissing' or 'whistling' sound? Take a look at all of the rubber hoses. Do any appear to be disconnected or cracked? This is where I would start.

And you made a great choice finding this site. We are happy to help all new enthusiests including the young and females. There isn't anything about cars a girl can't learn.

Thank you very much for your help! I have made a note of this and will discuss it with the mechanic who is coming tomorrow. My car actually makes some odd sounds but no hissing or whistling. Whether these other sounds are normal or related to the problem, I'm not sure. Huh I really wish I had guidance when I was buying this car! I'm glad I now have some sort of idea what the problem is though. Thanks again, really appreciate it.
  Reply
#9
c9zx;282845 Wrote:Welcome from Oklahoma. I'm glad to hear from a woman that is interested in old American iron, I don't see much of that anymore. As others have said, it is likely ignition or fuel delivery related (points, timing, carb adjustment/carb problem). I understand your concern about being ripped off. Between ignorance, incompetence, and dishonesty it is hard to find someone who can and will do quality work at a fair price. Do you have any relatives or friends that have automotive ability and that you trust? Is there a Vo-Tech near you that has an automotive program? Is there aa old American car club, or Mustang club near you? All could be possible sources of help. I hope you get it sorted out. Let us know how it goes. Chuck

Old American cars really are the best! I've had to endure years of old British cars that my dad has owned, and now that I'm old enough I couldn't buy a Mustang quick enough! Big Grin Thanks for the help, I have a mechanic coming to see it tomorrow who's worked on old Mustangs before, so things are looking good.
Just a quick question, can you check the vehicle history of a car for free if I give you the vin number of my Mustang? If that's at all possible and easy for you ... Smile
  Reply
#10
Welcome to the site and to the joys (torments?) of owning an old car!

Check the simple stuff first. Fuel filter.
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