• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
MIG Welding - Go for it OR Leave it to the Pros
#21
Absolutely go for it but make sure you practice first, Youtube is your friend here also
Some tools I find invaluable maybe already mentioned are plug welding kit such as this Eastwood one -  https://www.eastwood.com/mig-spot-weld-kit.html
This allows not only the correct distance but also you can push down with the nozzle to hold the two work pieces close together
Also when welding thin metal if you have access behind the panel make yourself a heat sink from copper or aluminium, this will prevent blowing holes
Eastwood make a few magnetic copper backing tools but be careful not to weld too close to the magnets
Oh and +1 on getting a good welding helmet, I've been welding blind for ages! time for a decent helmet
  Reply
#22
Also make sure whichever wall socket you plug into has a 20amp breaker or more. Most 110v MIG welders are very sensitive to the amperage at the breaker. I have one receptacle that is 30amp for my miller 120. Good luck!!
  Reply
#23
Be sure to check out what your local junior college offers for classes. Mig welding is pretty easy, but the better knowledge base you have the better your projects will turn out. Learning and practicing techniques to weld vertical and even overhead on a car are valuable since you can’t flip a car around too easily.

Someone beat be to it, but check what electrical you have available where you are going to use it. If your home has laundry in the garage most likely the washer is a dedicated 120v 20 amp circuit and the dryer is a 240v 30amp circuit.
As far as welders go, a 120V machine is fine for sheetmetal, but if you ever think you will do anything more than 1/8” or so consider a 240v machine.

Personally I favor Miller, Hobart or Lincoln
  Reply
#24
Any reason NOT to go with something like this from JEGS instead of that Eastwood Mig 135 I was looking at? This definitely seems like a much cheaper way to get into the 220v that a lot of you have recommended. Otherwise there is the Eastwood 175 for $449 plus shipping and also the Hobart 190 on Ebay for about $550.

http://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS-Performance-P...#reviewTab
  Reply
#25
Never mind that last post... Ordered a Hobart Handler 190 off of Ebay tonight! Smile So that settles it...I guess I'm learning how to weld.
[+] 1 user Likes ITMike5.0's post
  Reply
#26
Hobarts are decent welders. Should do everything you need. If you have any questions when setting up let us know. You won’t regret buying a welder. You will use it more than you think!!

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 044.jpg]

https://youtu.be/SoW1fhaFPzY
  Reply
#27
Just make sure that the drive roller tension, and the spool brake work well together, if you have too much tension it will flatten the wire and cause unsteady feeding, and premature wear on the liner for the wire, not enough tension and you will have intermittent wire feeding problems. If the spool tensioner is too tight, same thing, you will have spotty wire feeding, or it will over-spool causing a rat nest around your spool. The biggest rookie mistake I see are these issues. Other than that, try to keep your tip about 1/8" above the work and keep your movement steady. With sheet metal you have to do a lot of stitch welding, meaning zap-hold-zap-hold-zap-hold and so on. If you try to run a continuous bead you will likely blow through. Most rookies will not move fast enough to not burn through. This is not an insult, just an experience thing. If your welds start to bubble and spit, it means the metal is not clean enough. Welders hate rust!! Use 12-15cfh on your regulator/flow meter. That should be enough to shield your weld zone. Good luck and have fun!!!
  Reply
#28
(01-26-2018, 08:21 AM)Omie01 Wrote: Just make sure that the drive roller tension, and the spool brake work well together, if you have too much tension it will flatten the wire and cause unsteady feeding, and premature wear on the liner for the wire, not enough tension and you will have intermittent wire feeding problems. If the spool tensioner is too tight, same thing, you will have spotty wire feeding, or it will over-spool causing a rat nest around your spool. The biggest rookie mistake I see are these issues. Other than that, try to keep your tip about 1/8" above the work and keep your movement steady. With sheet metal you have to do a lot of stitch welding, meaning zap-hold-zap-hold-zap-hold and so on. If you try to run a continuous bead you will likely blow through. Most rookies will not move fast enough to not burn through. This is not an insult, just an experience thing. If your welds start to bubble and spit, it means the metal is not clean enough. Welders hate rust!! Use 12-15cfh on your regulator/flow meter. That should be enough to shield your weld zone. Good luck and have fun!!!

Goods tips.
I found that running a higher flow on your shielding gas helps get a nicer weld on sheetmetal and or any contaminated metals. I usually run my welder around 25CFH.

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 044.jpg]

https://youtu.be/SoW1fhaFPzY
  Reply
#29
Take the classes if you can.  I remember trying on my own and making real pretty welds that didn't have any strength.

Cosmetic welds on sheet metal are all about pretty.  When you get into floors, aprons, frame rails, crossmembers, seat pans, etc you need to be sure they are structurally sound.

Lessons learned.  That's why they have certified collision specialists.

kcmash
  Reply
#30
Practiced on a Hobart Handler 135 today with some scrap sheet metal at a friend's house.  I feel like I got the hang of it pretty fast and did pretty well for my first time ever trying to weld.  

The line on the left is the underside of my first set of welds.  The line on the right is a butt weld which I think looks pretty decent.  Obviously with more and more practice these should look better and better.  ...and maybe a couple of beers  Big Grin

[Image: practicewelds.jpg]
  Reply
Share Thread:  


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Welding question on front aprons slowpoke17 4 759 01-08-2019, 10:00 AM
Last Post: Hemikiller
  Welding strut rod cross member tony-muscle 14 1,934 02-18-2018, 01:37 AM
Last Post: tony-muscle
  Welding cost of floor pans peche 71 13 4,136 06-06-2016, 11:18 AM
Last Post: spothead
  seam welding front cross members for added strength 83slimer 10 1,951 10-26-2015, 12:35 PM
Last Post: Hemikiller
  Welding pans question;l Mexican 4 920 04-12-2015, 06:16 PM
Last Post: Omie01



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)