• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
MIG Welding - Go for it OR Leave it to the Pros
#1
OK, so I'm thinking of ding the welding work that my 72 Mach 1 project needs on my own.  New body panels, patches, etc.  I found an Eastwood MIG 135 welder online for $259 plus $20 for shipping.  It seems like a pretty good deal and a nice welder and they also have very informative videos online showing exactly how to use it and the proper way to MIG weld.

Eastwood MIG 135 for $259

So what do you guys think?  Go for it and add to my ever growing tool collection OR leave welding to the pros?
  Reply
#2
That depends upon you more than anything. MIG welding with gas is not difficult, but it takes practice to learn to set the machine up, keep it feeding wire smoothly etc. With a 1/2 day of practice you can lay down acceptable welds. If you will work with it on scrap for 3 or 4 days you will be able to lay down nice looking welds that are structurally sound. Learning to recognize proper penetration is important. With body panels you also have to be patient enough to go slow and not warp metal with excessive heat.

If you like to take shortcuts and find yourself satisfied with "good enough" you should let someone else do it.

[Image: 1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png]

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!
  Reply
#3
(01-23-2018, 11:08 AM)Jeff73Mach1 Wrote: That depends upon you more than anything.  MIG welding with gas is not difficult, but it takes practice to learn to set the machine up, keep it feeding wire smoothly etc.  With a 1/2 day of practice you can lay down acceptable welds.  If you will work with it on scrap for 3 or 4 days you will be able to lay down nice looking welds that are structurally sound.  Learning to recognize proper penetration is important.  With body panels you also have to be patient enough to go slow and not warp metal with excessive heat.

If you like to take shortcuts and find yourself satisfied with "good enough"  you should let someone else do it.

I would definitely spend some time practicing on scrap metal first, watching videos, etc.  I would consider myself closer to being a perfectionist than one who considers things "good enough"  :Smile  

What do you think about the Eastwood MIG 135 welder?
  Reply
#4
Go for it. Its only metal. You can cut, grind, weld, repeat over and over again. Its not like carpentry, you cant piece a 2x4 back together. But metal can easily be put back together.
It is like anything else, takes time to get good.  And like Jeff said, practice practice practice. Eastwood welders are pretty good for the money. Easy to set up, and come with a handy chart inside the cover to help you get your basic heat ranges and wire speed for most thicknesses of metal. Then they are infinitely variable in settings because unlike the Lincoln welders the settings are dials and can be set anywhere. Lincoln welders can only be set at certain settings not in between.  I have the 220volt version Eastwood 175 mig. I love it, had it for years with little to no issues. Their customers support is top notch and comes with a 3 year bumper to bumper warranty.  I weld alot more than the average DIYer and that welder has served me well for years. I actually just ordered the new TIG200 digital from Eastwood.

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
  Reply
#5
(01-23-2018, 11:35 AM)turtle5353 Wrote: Go for it. Its only metal. You can cut, grind, weld, repeat over and over again. Its not like carpentry, you cant piece a 2x4 back together. But metal can easily be put back together.
It is like anything else, takes time to get good.  And like Jeff said, practice practice practice. Eastwood welders are pretty good for the money. Easy to set up, and come with a handy chart inside the cover to help you get your basic heat ranges and wire speed for most thicknesses of metal. Then they are infinitely variable in settings because unlike the Lincoln welders the settings are dials and can be set anywhere. Lincoln welders can only be set at certain settings not in between.  I have the 220volt version Eastwood 175 mig. I love it, had it for years with little to no issues. Their customers support is top notch and comes with a 3 year bumper to bumper warranty.  I weld alot more than the average DIYer and that welder has served me well for years. I actually just ordered the new TIG200 digital from Eastwood.

Great info...thanks!  Given the fact that I have never done any welding before what other tools, welding accessories, etc will I need?  Obviously gloves, welding mask, some good clamps for welding body panels and patches...  I'm sure there is more I'm not aware of.
  Reply
#6
(01-23-2018, 11:43 AM)ITMike5.0 Wrote:
(01-23-2018, 11:35 AM)turtle5353 Wrote: Go for it. Its only metal. You can cut, grind, weld, repeat over and over again. Its not like carpentry, you cant piece a 2x4 back together. But metal can easily be put back together.
It is like anything else, takes time to get good.  And like Jeff said, practice practice practice. Eastwood welders are pretty good for the money. Easy to set up, and come with a handy chart inside the cover to help you get your basic heat ranges and wire speed for most thicknesses of metal. Then they are infinitely variable in settings because unlike the Lincoln welders the settings are dials and can be set anywhere. Lincoln welders can only be set at certain settings not in between.  I have the 220volt version Eastwood 175 mig. I love it, had it for years with little to no issues. Their customers support is top notch and comes with a 3 year bumper to bumper warranty.  I weld alot more than the average DIYer and that welder has served me well for years. I actually just ordered the new TIG200 digital from Eastwood.

Great info...thanks!  Given the fact that I have never done any welding before what other tools, welding accessories, etc will I need?  Obviously gloves, welding mask, some good clamps for welding body panels and patches...  I'm sure there is more I'm not aware of.

You can get by with basic tools. but the more you do this, the more tools you will accumulate.  Definitely need angle air grinder with 3m roloc discs. 4" andle grinder. a set of body hammers and dollies. air saw. 3" air grinder. grinding face shield.  air flange/punch tool. duck bill pliers. spotweld cutter bits. well stocked welder cabinet with consumables.  tin snips. various size c clamps. wide mouth vise grip clamps. 90 degree magnets.  air hammer with sharp chisel bits.  Nice EXTRAS  would be  torches. plasma cutter.3ft sheetmetal brake. Obviously you don't NEED all this stuff but they are nice!!! 
The list could go on and on.
[Image: IMG_0585.jpg]
[Image: IMG_0584.jpg]
[Image: IMG_0583.jpg]
[Image: IMG_0582.jpg]

[Image: IMG_0558.jpg]
[Image: IMG_0574.jpg]

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
  Reply
#7
Why not inquire at a local Vocational Technical School and see if they offer welding classes? That's what I did before plunking down a lot of cash for my MIG welder. I wanted to know if I had the aptitude for welding. What I learned was: there are days when I can do no good, and to just simply walk away. And then there are days when I could do no wrong. Those were more plentiful than the bad days, so I plunged ahead. It was a good investment of my time.

Let me check your shorts!
http://midlifeharness.com

[Image: Flamicon2.jpg]


[Image: oldfart.png]
[+] 1 user Likes midlife's post
  Reply
#8
(01-23-2018, 12:28 PM)midlife Wrote: Why not inquire at a local Vocational Technical School and see if they offer welding classes?  That's what I did before plunking down a lot of cash for my MIG welder.  I wanted to know if I had the aptitude for welding.  What I learned was: there are days when I can do no good, and to just simply walk away.  And then there are days when I could do no wrong.  Those were more plentiful than the bad days, so I plunged ahead.  It was a good investment of my time.

That's a good idea also!!
Another thing is...... I weld WAY better after a few Budlights!!!

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
  Reply
#9
A good reference book, that includes some metallurgy and welding, comes in handy. I have an older version of the "Machinery's Handbook" that is one of my favorites. It has an amazing collection of information.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
  Reply
#10
And regarding equipment, get a good helmet the cheap solar powered ones don't give you as goos a view of the work. Seeing what is going on is crucial to getting a good weld.

No experience with the Eastwood. My Lincoln 135 works well for sheetmetal, but I wish I had a bigger 220 unit.

[Image: 1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png]

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!
  Reply
Share Thread:  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Welding strut rod cross member tony-muscle 14 1,293 02-18-2018, 01:37 AM
Last Post: tony-muscle
  Welding cost of floor pans peche 71 13 2,480 06-06-2016, 11:18 AM
Last Post: spothead
  seam welding front cross members for added strength 83slimer 10 1,695 10-26-2015, 12:35 PM
Last Post: Hemikiller
  Welding pans question;l Mexican 4 810 04-12-2015, 06:16 PM
Last Post: Omie01
  Welding question, for the beginner. KC1971Grande 19 2,221 02-21-2015, 11:47 AM
Last Post: Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs
  how much should i pay for a mig welder bottle? 73rustang 4 658 12-12-2014, 04:20 PM
Last Post: 71mach351



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)