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lifting car and suspension damage
#1
I received a Mustang 360 newsletter recently that had the following article in it regarding raising a classic mustang with a 2 post lift and that it may cause suspension damage.

http://www.mustangandfords.com/how-to/ch...on-damage/

Also mentions a ford tool that was created to avoid said damage, which doesnt exist anymore.

Is anyone aware of this and is it something to be concerned with when raising our cars ?
Is there a way to avoid the damage besides using a suspension holding tool like the one mentioned in the article?

Thanks
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#2
Interesting, some of our members have reported having this problem. I haven't experienced it yet.

I'll bet Perkins will sell you his home made tool for $500.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#3
I remember seeing something about that as well... I think through Mustang Monthly.

Interesting.

Anybody know anything about this "special tool?" I'm leery about the term '[manufacturer] Special Tool' because my Grandma had a really nice '64 Lincoln Continental that needed maintenance, and basically just sat in her carport for the last 20 years of her life (before it was hauled away by someone wanting a project) because it needed a "Ford Special Tool" that nobody seemed to have or know where to get one from. Turns out, the "Ford Special Tool" required was simply a distributor wrench - she had taken the mechanic at his word when he attempted to squeeze out more money for a simply tune-up. Stories like that are the reason I learned how to work on my own stuff and get over my inhibitions regarding 'tough' jobs.

I would think as long as you put the pads under a suitable jacking point under the chassis (torque boxes, for example) there shouldn't be any issues.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#4
OK - I wrote that last post without actually having read the article. Shootself

My '71 lived on a drive-on lift the entire time it was being restored... sometimes jacked-up off the drive-on platforms on center/slider jacks - usually under the rear axle, torque boxes, or later under the sub frame connectors near the rear torque boxes.

I haven't noticed any suspension issues. Must just be after the rubber bushings have past their 'end-of-prime-of-life' window. The biggest 'weight' of the suspension stress is the wheels hanging out there on the end of the spindles. Take the wheels off once the car's in the air, and it will alleviate something like 40lbs+ on each side (depending on what kind of rim/tire combination you might have)

You think Bob Perkins would really let his tool go for $500? whistling

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#5
Well one thing I notice is a lot of today's said to fit shocks are shorter when fully extended. That put more down load on the shock bushings when hanging. There is a simple fix that. That tool isn't the answer.
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#6
YES, i believe this article...
I have a 2 post lift and the rubbers above on the shocks are damaged... just by the weight of the suspension and wheel from the ground.
Shootself
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#7
Has anyone measured the shock length needed to allow the suspension to fully travel when lifted? If the shock is long enough then it will allow the suspension to bottom out and it won't put any stress in the bushing. Is this possible to achieve?

1971 M-code Mach 1

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
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#8
I'm pretty sure as memory serves, the Factory manual covers that tool and describes how to make one. I recall it was considered essential for working on the front end components such as ball joints, lower control arms and the LCA cam bolt.
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#9
Bill73Ragtop;284291 Wrote:I'm pretty sure as memory serves, the Factory manual covers that tool and describes how to make one. I recall it was considered essential for working on the front end components such as ball joints, lower control arms and the LCA cam bolt.

+1 ^^^
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#10
I can see 2 problems with trying a longer shock so that the weight of the suspension doesn't hang on the shock bushings.
1, with a longer shock the suspension may bottom out on the shock instead of the snubber block.
2, having the suspension hang down lower will place more stress on the strut rod bushings and threaded end on the strut rod.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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