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How to organize too many sockets and wrenches?
#1
Ever since I wound up with Dad's tools, I've been trying to figure out how best to order the endless sockets I now have kicking about:

[Image: 18znc.jpg]

Organized, it may be (imperial at left, metric right, and some Whitworth in another drawer), but I'm not sure the organization here makes sense.

Should sockets of different drive sizes be mixed if the head size is the same? Particularly when they are Allen sockets? I've relegated one of the imperial socket rows (second from left) to nothing but 3/8" drive sockets, but each size includes standard, deep, and articulated sockets if I have them on hand - and some of those are duplicates too (though I have nothing against that - if there's one thing I've found, you always need two 7/16, 1/2" and 9/16" sockets on hand more often than not). Efficient or not?

On the other hand, should I organize by quality? The great majority of what I have here are pre-China Craftsman sockets with a smattering of SnapOn and Proto, but Sears' beer-budget Companion's sockets (curiously enough, of excellent quality - must have been a one-off supplier) make up the second largest number of sockets. Fact is, nothing here is bad enough to consider worthy of its own "trash-tools-for-trash-jobs" drawer, which makes me question why I'd bother categorizing them by quality to begin with.

That said, what have you fellows found to be the most efficient manner of socket organization? I'm open to suggestions.

-Kurt

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How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
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#2
Looks better than my tools at home or work.

I say, good job!
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#3
matrixx;191422 Wrote:Looks better than my tools at home or work.

I say, good job!

I'm no fan of Harbor Freight, but their 99-cent socket organizers certainly make organization quick and cheap. Not as good as old Craftsman organizers, but they do the job.

Also helps that they just opened one less than three miles away.

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
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#4
2 drawers?

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, you sure as Hell don't have time to do it right the second time.

Dutch uncle
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#5
Hey Kurt,

That looks a pretty good jod there. I think a major key factor in any layout is to have the ability to know where to grab any piece of tool fast and easy when you want it, just as it is easy to return any piece when the job's over and you packing up. If that is easy, then your tools are truely well organised.

Btw, nice collection you have there.

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
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#6
Things would be so much easier with less sockets. Please send me whatever you are not keeping.

Let me check your shorts!
http://midlifeharness.com

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#7
Austin Vert;191430 Wrote:That looks a pretty good jod there. I think a major key factor in any layout is to have the ability to know where to grab any piece of tool fast and easy when you want it, just as it is easy to return any piece when the job's over and you packing up. If that is easy, then your tools are truely well organised.

Ideal only when the tools are not far from the car. In my case, I have to drag whatever tools I figure I'll need to the front of the house to work on the cars.

Being able to pull the minimum of socket rails out of the workbench - and not have to make a return trip to the toolbox - would be the ideal scenario.

midlife;191436 Wrote:Things would be so much easier with less sockets. Please send me whatever you are not keeping.

Hey, there's another '71 in the area for sale...could use some funds!

Wink

In all seriousness, I might have to ease off here. Some of the duplication is just ridiculous - all with exception to the American-made Crafstman sockets and wrenches. While I can always warranty them, the latest Chinese Craftsman stuff looks as if it was made by the same company that makes Harbor Freight sockets.

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
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#8
midlife;191436 Wrote:Things would be so much easier with less sockets. Please send me whatever you are not keeping.

Like the t shirt dancebananaBig Grin
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#9
I would eliminate duplication of sockets for sure. (Same points/depth/drive)

And then organize by drive/points/length. When I grab a rack of sockets I know what drive/points/length I probably need. Then it is just a matter of what size. You wouldn't want a rack of 7/16" sockets starting with 1/4" drive small, both points then shallow and deep. Then the same size 3/8" drive and then 1/2" drive. When searching for a socket you 'know' what type you want, you just might be off on the size. That's my two cents.

'Mike'
73 Convertible - 351C/4V CC heads/4bolt/forged flat tops/comp 270/rhodes/mallory unilite/tri-power/hookers/glasspacks/c6/3.50 limited slip/Gear Vendors/Global West sub frames, strut rods and shelby style traction bars/ Rear sway bar/tilt steering (not original)

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#10
        i have used this method for quite some time .


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