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Had the 71 repainted
#1
As some of you may already know I've had paint issues due to a poor single stage repaint by the previous owner but I didn't want to keep dumping more money in the car so was trying to make do with the paint job I had. Finally gave up and had the car painted last week. I did a lot of the prep, removed all stickers/stripes, removed both bumpers, both spoilers, hood pins, mirrors and all trim/window moldings. They did the sanding, a sealer, two base coats urethane (same color) and then 3 clear coats. Per agreement no color sanding or buffing after they painted it.

Since I'm in no hurry to have the job finished they recommended I wait at least a month to let the paint cure before it's color sanded and buffed, it'll be harder to buff but turn out better according to them. I didn't have them include that in the price since I wanted to explore either doing it myself or having a detail shop do it. The paint doesn't have any runs at all but it does have some orange peel and nibs (dirt) in several places in the clear coats which they said would wet sand/polish right out.

I like doing as much as possible on the Mustang myself (my labor is cheap and I enjoy doing it) so I'm asking for advice from you paint guys. I'm also trying to avoid the Mustang turning into more of money pit than it already is. As always much appreciated.

Jim

   

Jim

M code 71 Mach 1, 351 4V Cleveland, Ram Air (not factory), C6 Trans, 3.5 rear
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#2
Jim and Jutta;98924 Wrote:As some of you may already know I've had paint issues due to a poor single stage repaint by the previous owner but I didn't want to keep dumping more money in the car so was trying to make due with the paint job I had. Finally gave up and had the car painted lat week. I did most of the prep removal, removed all stickers, removed both bumpers, both spoilers, hood pins, mirrors and all trim/window moldings. They did the sanding, a sealer, two base coats urethane (same color) and then 3 clear coats. Per agreement no colore sanding or buffing after they painted it.

Since I'm in no hurry to have the job finished they recommended I wait at least a month to let the paint cure before it's color sanded and buffed, it'll be harder to buff but turn out better according to them. I didn't have them include that in the price since I wanted to explore either doing it myself or having a detail shop do it. The paint doesn't have any runs at all but it does have some orange peel and nibs (dirt) in several places in the clear coats which they said would wet sand/polish right out.

I like doing as much as possible on the Mustang myself (my labor is cheap) so I'm asking for advice from you paint guys. I'm also trying to avoid the Mustang turning into more of money pit than it already is. As always much appreciated.

Jim

Jim It looks great. Check out this thread for some info. I posted it when i was painting my nephews car and it helped me out a ton. Lots of knowledable people on here to give ya some advice. Mine is to go slow with the wet sanding and be very careful at the edges with the buffer. Always tape up the adjacent panels so you dont accidentally burn through an opposite edge. Run the buffer so the pad is spinning off the panel and not onto it. Burn edge really quick if you do that. That was the first time i ever did it and it looked like 2 different cars when i was done. Make sure you buy a high quality rubbing compound and glaze. i used 3m but everyone has their favorite. I used a foam pad also and not the wool pads. wool seemed a little too aggressive. Use lots of water and keep your paper clean! Im sure i missed a few thing but that should give you a little heads up with my little bit of info i have . Good Luck, cant wait to see the finished product.
LOOK at this thread for more info http://www.7173mustangs.com/thread-updat...-clearcoat

Kevin

Kevin

1971 Mach 1
408C Stroker
C4 w/3,000 stall
8.8" Rear w/3.73's
Disc brakes all way around.

[Image: 28ivsix.png]




                                                                                             
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#3
1. Wash the car

2. Wipe the car with a mild solvent or commercially available wax and grease remover

3. Buy 3 or 4 sheets of each 2000, 1500,and 1200 grit wet and dry sand paper

4.Were going to walk down a ladder here and then back up again. I can’t see the condition of your paint so I can’t tell you which grit to use. Start with the 2000 grit if that seems to be leveling the surface great. If you determine that it’s just not doing the job go with the 1500 if that isn’t getting the job done go to the 1200. Now let’s say you have to use the 1200 after you have introduced throes scratches your going to have to cut the tops off of the scratch with the 1500 and then again with the 2000 grit. You can see you will be doing the whole job three times with this example so you want to get the job done with the finest scratch that will work.

5.Start with the finest grit, 2000 put a couple of sheets into a bucket of warm water and add a few drops of detergent (I just use what ever I'm using to wash dishes with at the time) and yes I almost always wash the dishes at my house. Let the sand paper soak for at least 15 minutes until it curls up we want the sand paper saturated. The detergent is for lubrication. Wrap the sand paper around a sanding block or a sponge and as you sand keep the surface wet and dunk the sand paper often a single piece of sand paper goes a long way if you keep it wet. When you are done the surface is going to look very dull and to bring back a shine we have to get rid of the sand scratches.

6. This is the point at which you need a piece of equipment; the standard of the industry is a 7” polisher you can rent these or purchase them form $75 -$400 Pads for the buffer are made off wool or foam. I like foam pads they don’t last as long as wool but I’m less likely to scorch the surface and I get better results. You will need two pads (a dense firm pad for compounding and a soft pad for polishing)

7. With old paint a rubbing compound was used to scourer the surface it had an abrasive in it but with modern urethane clear coats we need a rubbing compound that actually reflows the clear. Squirt some on to the surface and “butter it in.” That means spread the compound lightly with the polisher used at low speed and then let it sit on the surface thirty seconds or so to let the chemical action begin. You want to work areas that are four square feet or so before moving along operate the buffer at the lowest speed and don’t press down. Let the buffer do the work you are just there to guide it. Now it should be starting to look good. However you will see swirl marks the darker the color the more you will noticeable the swirl marks will be.

8. Hang in there we’re getting near the end. We are going to use a polymer sealant to fill throes swirl marks fill up the voids in the paint and give a gloss. WE ARE NOT GOING TO USE WAX. Wax is bad for paint it has always been bad for paint it was just the best thing they back in the good old days. Today with the advances in polymer technology we can make the paint stronger, longer lasting shiny 3M, Meaguire’s and Finish Kare all make good polymers sealants I use Finish Kare’s Polywipe. Go down to your local automotive paint store and ask them what they carry. Don’t bother to ask at the local parts supply house they just don’t know about this and will likely sell you wax. As far as how it is applied well that is very much like wax apply it with a soft cloth tee shirt material is good old cloth diapers are even better, work it in then let it have up for five or ten minutes. Next, buff with your clean sot foam pad. Work small areas at a time because you don’t want it to harden up it will get very hard and you will have a hard time removing it. Pay special attention to the hood and drivers side door those are the areas people look at closest.

9. Pay attention to the little areas like the edge of the hood and trunk lid get those spots clean before the polymer hardens

10. Pat your self on the back for a job well done.
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#4
Thanks guys all good stuff to keep me on track. I checked out the link your proved Kevin: http://www.7173mustangs.com/thread-updat...-clearcoat and it actually provides me with the information I need. I'm leaning towards doing it myself and only using a DA for the polishing since I don't feel comfortable doing the wet sanding with it, that'll be by hand. The dirt nibs in the clear coat actually bothers me more than the orange peel but apparently they're easier to remove than the orange peel.

Jim

M code 71 Mach 1, 351 4V Cleveland, Ram Air (not factory), C6 Trans, 3.5 rear
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#5
She looking good Jim {thumbs up}
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#6
Jim, I can help you with this... it's real easy to hurt the paint and burn though on edges of you don't know how to run a buffer. I painted/cut/buffed a car when I went to clover park, and have done a cut and buff on several since.

Who painted it?

1973 Mach 1 Q code 351 4V, 9A paint, standard interior, 3.50 rear, C6 trans.
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#7
Totalled;98936 Wrote:Jim, I can help you with this... it's real easy to hurt the paint and burn though on edges of you don't know how to run a buffer. I painted/cut/buffed a car when I went to clover park, and have done a cut and buff on several since.

Who painted it?

Pat your offer of assistance is accepted! Looking at doing it around mid Dec or after Christmas, no hurry won't be driving it until Spring.

The paint shop that did it is own and operated by Vets in Puyallup, being a Vet I try to support Vets when I can and they were recommended to me by a friend who had his car painted there several years ago.

Jim

Jim

M code 71 Mach 1, 351 4V Cleveland, Ram Air (not factory), C6 Trans, 3.5 rear
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#8
Depending on what kind of base/clear (manufacturer and type), you probably do NOT want to wait a month to cut and buff!
Most clears are ready to buff after a day or 2... depending on many factors.
Heat/humidity/airflow all contribute to curing time.
Note the use of the words "depending on" Smile

My first buffing practice was on my Fox car better than 12 years ago. Finish was less than a week old, used 2000 grit 3M paper with Meguiars Diamond Cut on a wool pad followed up with their Cleaner/Wax. Yes, I burned an edge or 2.

I have since used some 3M compounds with foam pads and like the result a bit better on the black base/clear job I did on my oak kitchen cabinet doors (it's a very long story...).

However, I had a second decklid painted for the Fox car and waited a month + to sand and buff. Polishing concrete would have been easier - it cured like a rock and laughed at the 2000 grit paper. I think I had to drop back to 800 (I think) for the initial cut, it was that hard.

Go slow, check the work often.

Pete - MotoArts Decals and Signs
'71 Sportsroof 351C-4V/4-speed - FINALLY under construction - no, wait, on hold again...
'90 Mustang 7-Up 5.0 ragtop, rolling beater
'66 Sunbeam Tiger Mk.IA, survivor
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#9
Jim and Jutta;98924 Wrote:Since I'm in no hurry to have the job finished they recommended I wait at least a month to let the paint cure before it's color sanded and buffed, it'll be harder to buff but turn out better according to them.

Why do they tell you one month, where if they had to, they would have sanded it within a couple of days of laying down the paint?

In 2006, we had a MAACO/1 Day paint job done with Sherwin Williams 2K Polyurethane.

After painting, it looked absolutely like crap. It was the deepest orange peel I had ever seen in my life...and it was everywhere. I thought the hood was trashed.

3 days later, after they sanded or whatever they did, it was unbelievably flat. Everywhere. No orange peel. Some people thought we lacquered the car. Really.

6 years later, with zero wax, the car still beads water and shines like mad.

So, if Maaco can do this, I am sure you will be able to make yourself more than satisfied.

And, it looks like the black hood is absolutely the right sheen...for my tastes anyway.

[Image: 11jmcuc.png]
351C Bold Manners, Brash Attitude
Favorite Teams: Michigan Wolverines and Whoever Is Playing Ohio State.

When I drive past a herd of cows, the cows MOO at me
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#10
It depends on if they have a booth that can bake it or not. Most production shops can and do bake it after spaying. If they don't bake it, it will be too soft to cut on right away. It will shrink and show scratches, if you don't burn through while trying to buff it.

You'll want to wait at least a month anyway before you put any wax or sealer type product on it. I'd actually wait till the spring when you are going to take it out again.

1973 Mach 1 Q code 351 4V, 9A paint, standard interior, 3.50 rear, C6 trans.
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