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front disk brake service
#11
Guys, thanks for all this info!! This has helped a lot and hopefully I can do it myself, learn something and save some money!
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#12
(10-13-2018, 09:04 AM)SteveO_71 Wrote: Whats with the safety wire on the bolts on the back?? I think replacement bolts do have holes for that wire.

Didnt they have lock-tite in the 70's?


Nothing is more secure than safety wire if you want to be able to remove them in the future, used everywhere on aircraft to this day. It's on the caliper bracket bolts, attaching them to the spindle. Might have been a Federal standard or just the way Ford did it.


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#13
(10-13-2018, 10:05 AM)Hemikiller Wrote:
(10-13-2018, 09:04 AM)SteveO_71 Wrote: Whats with the safety wire on the bolts on the back?? I think replacement bolts do have holes for that wire.

Didnt they have lock-tite in the 70's?


Nothing is more secure than safety wire if you want to be able to remove them in the future, used everywhere on aircraft to this day. It's on the caliper bracket bolts, attaching them to the spindle. Might have been a Federal standard or just the way Ford did it.

Would a Lowes type store sell safety wire or would I need to go to a Summit type store?

Also, thanks for all the tips and suggestions throughout this post! I finally did manage to complete the brake overall; new rotors, new calipers, new bearings / races and as well as bearings and rotors packed with grease. Everything is torqued and lines are bled. Just need to add the safety wire.

Now that everything is back together, as I spin the wheel it sounds like shoes are in slight contact with the rotor. Wheel still spins freely though. Unfortunately since its snow up this way, I cant really drive the car for a few months to get things settled in.

Is this normal and things adjust with wear?  I thought I was reading in Shop Tips regarding tolerances and it mentioned 0 - .010. Are tolerances that close between the rotor and shoes?
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#14
I don't think you'll find it at Lowe's. Summit, Grainger or Amazon has it.

Yes, disk brake tolerances are that close. You will typically feel or hear some slight drag. Disk brake pads do not have retracting springs and only the rotor turning keeps them dragging.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#15
The disc pads dragging is about the only fault with disc brakes. Back in the day when you got drum or disc the disc brakes gave you about 1 mpg less mileage due to drag. When the NASCAR guys go out to qualify they push the pads back so they do not drag and the driver does not hit the brakes until he makes his qualifying lap. They always remind them to pump the brakes to push the pistons back out when coming in.
Since there are no springs to return the pads or park them the do drag. Your drum brakes have springs to pull them away from the shoe and also the automatic adjusters to keep them right distance away.
When you put grease in your front bearings you did not fill up the whole hub did you? You only need to pack around the roller bearings and coat the outer race.


When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
Tongue
David
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#16
SteveO_71 Wrote:

What size bleeder is standard.. the 1/4" one?
_____________

FYI-From research I have done I thought I remember that 71-72 is 1/4 but 73 is 3/8" If anyone can confirm let me know.

1973 Mustang convertible, F code w/ C4, stock survivor with refresh in progress. Blue glow w/ Blue Comfortweave interior.
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#17
(12-08-2018, 05:02 PM)JimB73 Wrote: SteveO_71 Wrote:

What size bleeder is standard.. the 1/4" one?
_____________

FYI-From research I have done I thought I remember that 71-72 is 1/4 but 73 is 3/8" If anyone can confirm let me know.

Actually on my 71, the fronts had a 3/8" fitting.
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#18
(12-08-2018, 02:37 PM)Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs Wrote: The disc pads dragging is about the only fault with disc brakes. Back in the day when you got drum or disc the disc brakes gave you about 1 mpg less mileage due to drag. When the NASCAR guys go out to qualify they push the pads back so they do not drag and the driver does not hit the brakes until he makes his qualifying lap. They always remind them to pump the brakes to push the pistons back out when coming in.
Since there are no springs to return the pads or park them the do drag. Your drum brakes have springs to pull them away from the shoe and also the automatic adjusters to keep them right distance away.
When you put grease in your front bearings you did not fill up the whole hub did you? You only need to pack around the roller bearings and coat the outer race.

I just packed the bearings and put a grease coating on the races and spindle. Didnt pack the whole hub with grease.

Thanks for the advice!
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