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For the IT members
#1
So I have this new laptop and a Linksys router.
How do I get the laptop to connect to the router
without the router broadcasting SSID?
If I set the router to broadcast, there is no problem.
The problem being I don't want the router to
broadcast SSID. Without the broadcast, the laptop
can't find the router.
I know there is an easy fix.

mike

[Image: 1_11_11_13_11_50_27.png]
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#2
I'm not a network admin or PC tech but here is a suggestion:

Linksys routers are usually pretty straightforward with their setup and admin settings.
Sounds like you will have to manually provide a network ID for the laptop to find router in network settings.
Then save that location as default; eliminating the network scan most network cards' software commonly perform at bootup.
All I got for now. Good luck.

Ray

1971 Boss 351  
1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 
1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 
1973 Mach 1 (parts car)
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#3
have the SSID on, connect to network, then turn off the SSID.
Recommend using WPA/PSK2 encryption.
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#4
Got it!
Setup the router for WEP and generated a key code which was entered into the dial-up ID on the laptop.
OR something like that. But is working now with router broadcasting SSID although you now need the
key code. Like you said, pretty straight forward.

mike

[Image: 1_11_11_13_11_50_27.png]
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#5
RacerX;63154 Wrote:have the SSID on, connect to network, then turn off the SSID.
Recommend using WPA/PSK2 encryption.

The above should work, as long as you save the location. You can also manually create the wireless location by just typing in the SSID along with the encryption key info, and then again save the location info.

I would avoid WEP, as it is not as secure as WPA/PSK2. Personally, I have set up MAC filtering, and only allow PC's on my list to access the network.


1972 H-code Mach1
2010 GT Premium
2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T
1995 F150- The "home depot" machine
2012 Harley Davidson Road Glide Ultra
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#6
trainey;63156 Wrote:
RacerX;63154 Wrote:have the SSID on, connect to network, then turn off the SSID.
Recommend using WPA/PSK2 encryption.

The above should work, as long as you save the location. You can also manually create the wireless location by just typing in the SSID along with the encryption key info, and then again save the location info.

I would avoid WEP, as it is not as secure as WPA/PSK2. Personally, I have set up MAC filtering, and only allow PC's on my list to access the network.

Right, on all accounts. If you're using DHCP, set the range for only the number of machines you are running wirelessly (if just the laptop, then set it for 1). I recommend turning DHCP 'Off' and programming the IP address, Default Gateway, and DNS server IP addresses in manually - that way it'll only EVER be you on the router (unless some $up3r 733t H@X0r$ come along - then you're just screwed no matter what you put up there).

And then once the laptop and router are happy - turn off SSID for 'stealth mode'

Using the right tools, anybody can crack WEP, WPA, and WPA2 in less than 10 minutes by simply Googling it. Obviously, as an IT security manager, I don't condone doing this - but just letting you know how easy it is to crack into anybody's networks via wireless.

A couple of things to consider: get a good network monitoring tool and use it. That way you'll be able to notice when you have someone on the network stealing your bandwidth or probing your systems.

Also be on the lookout for evidence of 'war driving (when someone successfully cracks into your network, and displays your information for others to use). It's an old school practice to 'tag' a location with specific information. Here's a typical diagram:

[Image: wardrive_grafity.jpg]


Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#7
Mister 4x4;63234 Wrote:And then once the laptop and router are happy - turn off SSID for 'stealth mode'

A couple of things to consider: get a good network monitoring tool and use it. That way you'll be able to notice when you have someone on the network stealing your bandwidth or probing your systems.


Ok, Thanks for the advice. I once knew this stuff but have not used it
in years. I do run Norton 360 on both machines (desktop/laptop).
The router's firewall is on.
Is there a way to get the laptop to find the router if SSID is off?
When I turn on the laptop no less than 15 other networks pop up.

mike

[Image: 1_11_11_13_11_50_27.png]
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#8
My advice: get into the router set-up (with a wired connection), turn off DHCP, get the MAC address of your laptop's wireless NIC, and enter it into the MAC address filtering.

Then on your laptop: program the static IP address/subnet/default gateway & DNS server addresses. Also set the 'remember me' status through WEP/WPA/whatever you're using.

Once you're connected to the system, it 'should' recognize the laptop when it tries to connect with or without the SSID being on. After the initial connection, you should be able to go back into the router set-up, shut off SSID, and your laptop should still be connected.

Your laptop will be the only wireless connection allowed onto the network wirelessly, and your neighbors won't even know you're there. Whenever you need to add a new device or have friends come over (and want to share your connection with them), you'll need to go into the router set-up, add their wireless device NICs to the MAC address filtering, give them your WEP/WPA/Whatever key, and they're good to go until you remove them from the MAC address filters.


As for all of the other networks showing up, you can simply delete them out of the list, or set your machine up to ignore other networks (which will have to be reset if/when you take your laptop to somewhere else and need to connect).

I'm sorry the answers are kinda vague, but I have no idea what kind of laptop and operating system you're using, and my advice is based on my experience with all my Linksys products (I swear by 'em).

Hope that helps.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#9
Mister 4x4;63307 Wrote:Once you're connected to the system, it 'should' recognize the laptop when it tries to connect with or without the SSID being on. After the initial connection, you should be able to go back into the router set-up, shut off SSID, and your laptop should still be connected.

I'm sorry the answers are kinda vague, but I have no idea what kind of laptop and operating system you're using, and my advice is based on my experience with all my Linksys products (I swear by 'em).

Hope that helps.

My computer is a Sun II 120 running BSD 3.2 Tongue
I only wish it was that simple.
The laptop is running Windows 7 which is only a little
better than MS DOS 1.1 without all the pretty pictures.

Your answers are just fine and I will work with them.
Thanks for the advice.

mike

[Image: 1_11_11_13_11_50_27.png]
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#10
goodnigh;63310 Wrote:
Mister 4x4;63307 Wrote:Once you're connected to the system, it 'should' recognize the laptop when it tries to connect with or without the SSID being on. After the initial connection, you should be able to go back into the router set-up, shut off SSID, and your laptop should still be connected.

I'm sorry the answers are kinda vague, but I have no idea what kind of laptop and operating system you're using, and my advice is based on my experience with all my Linksys products (I swear by 'em).

Hope that helps.

My computer is a Sun II 120 running BSD 3.2 Tongue
I only wish it was that simple.
The laptop is running Windows 7 which is only a little
better than MS DOS 1.1 without all the pretty pictures.

Your answers are just fine and I will work with them.
Thanks for the advice.

mike
You should be able to get into the Linksys router via web browser (usually: http://192.168.1.1 if that's your IP scheme - which is the default). You need the admin user and password - everything's web-based on the unit. If it blows up, then just push the little pin button on the back for 10-15 seconds to reset it all back to default. If you have the quick set up booklet, it will explain how to get in... the rest is pretty straightforward.

I ran Blade 150s, Ultra 10s, and some other older Sun pizza boxes (Sparc 20s) and the Solaris 8 came with Mozilla... which worked like a champ to get into web-based applications.

As for Windows 7, I'll have to wait til I get home for more specific details - I'm on my 'Dumpster Mac' right now (MacBook Pro a friend fished out of a dumpster and I repaired) - I got Windows 7 Ultimate, XP Pro, Win2K Server, Win ME, and Red Hat Fedora running on various boxes at home.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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