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Feeling Frustrated
#1
Well, I finally scrounged together about two hours today to try and get some work done on my 73. I got the cut off wheel out and went at removing the Swiss cheese portion of my passenger lower rear quarter. Got it out to finally see that the trunk drop off is pretty well toast. So I turned my attention to the small rust spot right in front of the rear passenger rear wheel. Metal is Swiss cheese basically all the way down to the rocker.

Between that, the similar damage on the driver side, the bad tail light panel, and toasted trunk lip, I'm ready to admit that I'm in over my head here. I have neither the skills nor the time to properly learn and then tackle how to do this kind of body work. Rebuild a motor and transmission? Sure. But not this.

Too it off with the constant yet never happening threat of finally being sent to training and I'm just not enjoying this anymore.

So, do I sell the 73 and try to not get totally upside down on the deal, do I knuckle under and pay a body guy to do these repairs, or do I suck it up and just keep trying to make headway?

I'm really frustrated at this point. I didn't inspect the car enough before I bought it


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2013 Ford Focus SE Flex Fuel 5spd - Daily Driver
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#2
I totally get what you're saying. I've been down the same road. I had a lot of hidden rust on mine, and wound up replacing the front fenders, inner panels, floor pans, both quarter panels and inner wheel house panels. I did so only after looking for a cleaner car, and came to the conclusion that Ford simply didn't intend on theses cars being around for 40+ years. It's been one hell of an investment of time and money, but I'm building the car the way I want, so I was able to justify the additional work. When it's all said and done, I'll have over $40k invested in it, so selling it for a profit is out of the question, and that's OK, because I have told my family that when I die, they can bury me in it. LOL! I guess what I'm trying to say, is that if you really like the car, go ahead and build it. It doesn't have to be done tomorrow. God knows I've been working on mine for over twenty years. The end result will out weigh the frustration you're feeling now. Good luck with your decision.

-Travis

- Travis



I'm an analog man in a digital world.
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#3
Yep, what Travis said. I've been there myself.

Steve



[Image: 25yvyp3.jpg]
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#4
Michael,

Sounds like you had a bad day....couple of potential things to consider.

You could cut out the rusted pieces and cut the patches to fit from aftermarket sheet metal. You could then call one of the Mobile Welders that are around and have them come to you and weld up. You grind down and finish.

Another option is a body shop...I know of one that does sheet metal work that is reasonable in Orange County.

Jeff

Jeff
1972 Q Code Convertible
1973 Q Code Mach 1 Ford Marketing Sales Vehicle
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#5
I guess I can't really speak on this as my situation was different as far as the car shape goes...but I agree with Doug the Dog as far as anything you do to it will ultimately be more gratifying then the frustrations along the way. But if you end up wanting to start fresh with a more complete car, let me know and I'd be willing to help you search throughout SoCal....there is that one in Simi Valley too, that sounds flexible on the price too...good luck and it definitely helps to have the support of everyone on this site.
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#6
Its a labor of love and not a money maker. All the crap you see on TV is just that. I agree the original makers of some of the most loved cars Ford, GM, Chevy were not building classics. They built cars that weren't expected to be around 40 years later. They became classic years later. In our case many many years later. The TV shows subsidize the work and they selectively fix stuff to make the most money like a person does to flip a house. If you like that car do it. If you want perfection pay some one. If you want a fun driver that looks nice take your time and work slowly. But I suggest not dismantling and cutting up the car in a lot of pieces. Work slow and methodically in areas to fix the issues. So you don't lose your place and get discouraged when you forget how it should be. I know its discouraging. I have had my stang for almost 10 years and been working on it continuously to get it just right. But I have pecked at it piece by piece when I am up to the task. Enjoy driving it a few times a year as I work on it. Ensures I don't forget why I love driving it so much.
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#7
Doug The Dog;169716 Wrote:I totally get what you're saying. I've been down the same road. I had a lot of hidden rust on mine, and wound up replacing the front fenders, inner panels, floor pans, both quarter panels and inner wheel house panels. I did so only after looking for a cleaner car, and came to the conclusion that Ford simply didn't intend on theses cars being around for 40+ years. It's been one hell of an investment of time and money, but I'm building the car the way I want, so I was able to justify the additional work. When it's all said and done, I'll have over $40k invested in it, so selling it for a profit is out of the question, and that's OK, because I have told my family that when I die, they can bury me in it. LOL! I guess what I'm trying to say, is that if you really like the car, go ahead and build it. It doesn't have to be done tomorrow. God knows I've been working on mine for over twenty years. The end result will out weigh the frustration you're feeling now. Good luck with your decision.

-Travis

+ 1 to what Travis has said.

Although I have had numerous issues with my build though not so much with rust I have at times wondered why I am doing this. What it boils down to in the end is the satisfaction of getting the car restored and looking at what you have accomplished. There will be days when you are totally frustrated and days when you look back and smile when you see what you have accomplished. You say that you don't have the skills for the bodywork but you will surprise yourself of what you can accomplish. Take your time and when you get frustrated take a break, relax and then tackle it when you have had a chance to figure out your next steps. In the end you won't regret it.
-jbojo

-john
(jbojo)
351C 4V cc heads, 10.5 : 1 CR, 290 Herbert cam, Flat top forged pistons, forged connecting rods, Atomic efi,
C6 with Gear Vendor overdrive, 3.89 Tru Trac, Hooker Super Comp with 2 1/2" Pypes Exhaust.        

Some Mod pictures can be seen at:

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#8
Frustration is part of the game.Big Grin Your car isn't that bad. Don't give up on it.

The more you do your self the better off you will be. Here is some pics how I did mine. 1st do one spot at a time. Trust me you will learn trick as you go. 2nd Don't over think this metal work,it's just time consuming. 3rd Bye some patch panels. 4th Only use what you need. 5 Then just start test fitting till you get to fit. Then do what Jeff said and have a mobile welder come out.


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#9
I think that the problem that I have is I just don't love the car. It's a cool car and I've really enjoyed the process of working on it, but when I think classic mustang that I'd like to own, it's just not the 73 that comes to mind.


In terms of the bodywork, I think what frustrates me is feeling so lost with it. I've read some books but it's not the same as having someone experienced come guide me through it.

I don't mind the welding part, I bought my own welder and I've actually done quite a bit before this, so that doesn't bother me.


Oddly enough what I'd really want is a 1976 Mustang II Cobra. Call me crazy but there's just something about them.

Mach71351c when you did the patch in front of the wheel well, how did you secure the bottom edge to the rocker?



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2013 Ford Focus SE Flex Fuel 5spd - Daily Driver
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#10
MechEng;169748 Wrote:I think that the problem that I have is I just don't love the car. It's a cool car and I've really enjoyed the process of working on it, but when I think classic mustang that I'd like to own, it's just not the 73 that comes to mind.


In terms of the bodywork, I think what frustrates me is feeling so lost with it. I've read some books but it's not the same as having someone experienced come guide me through it.

I don't mind the welding part, I bought my own welder and I've actually done quite a bit before this, so that doesn't bother me.


Oddly enough what I'd really want is a 1976 Mustang II Cobra. Call me crazy but there's just something about them.

Mach71351c when you did the patch in front of the wheel well, how did you secure the bottom edge to the rocker?



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Then frankly from what you have posted the thing to do is sell the 73 and use the funds as a down payment and buy the best Cobra II you can find. It will be paid off in 3 years and will cost less than paying someone to restore a car and you will be able to enjoy it from day one.

73 conv. 460, D0VE large valve heads, Performer RPM manifold, Voodoo 227/233 cam, Holley 950 HP carb, C6 trans, 3.25 trak-loc.
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