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Evans High Performance Waterless Coolant
#1
runninpony 
Hello Everybody, is anyone using Evans waterless coolant and if so what are your experiences with it? I would like to start using this product since after the engine, radiator, heater core etc. are completely free of water (3% or less). It's said that it can run 30 degrees lower than normal temperature. Thanks!

Old Mustangs never die, they just go faster!
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#2
waste of money

While it may be effective in certain vehicles, the old school antifreeze we use works just fine. If you're having overheating issues, you should look elsewhere besides your coolant first.


[+] 1 user Likes Hemikiller's post
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#3
I use it in my 69B2 and have had no heating issues for years. Does that make it better? I don't know but its been good to me.   Ed
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#4
I have been contemplating it in my 72 as well. I like the idea of corrosion protection for the coolant system. I do use distilled water in my system, but change out about every two years. I know you can test the conductivity of the water with an ohms meter, but I am just set on every 2 years. I have seriously been considering to change over to the Evans. One thing I have heard is that it does not offer the same freeze protection temps that coolant offers. Living in the south that is less of an issue.

BKDunha
72 Mach 1 H-Code (Concourse driven restoration)
67 S-Code Factory GT with 4-Spd

68 Mercury Cyclone (Pro-Street project)
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#5
I see people changing their coolant. I would question why? My 2002 Ford F-150 with 5.4 has 285,000 miles on it and I have never taken the radiator cap off. Never changed a hose on radiator or heater. Why should I change it?
David


When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
Tongue
David
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#6
Coolant gets dirty, absorbs metal from engine parts, and becomes conductive. This causes electrolysis action in aluminum radiators and heater cores, and solder in brass radiators and heater cores, which eats away at the susceptible (reactive) metals. If you think changing heater cores is fun in our Mustangs, wait until you have to change the one in your F150. I had to change the one in my 2000 Navigator when it was 9 years old, so I follow coolant changing recommendations for my 2010 F150.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#7
(07-20-2018, 09:59 AM)Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs Wrote: I see people changing their coolant. I would question why? 

Coolant is like underwear. You can keep them on for a long time if you want or change once a while, either way unless you have a leak, they'll do the job  Smile

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#8
Here is an assessment (perhaps biased) of Evans Waterless Coolant. Despite the fact it was commissioned by a competitor I think it raises some interesting points.

https://www.norosion.com/evanstest.htm

73 conv. 460, D0VE large valve heads, Performer RPM manifold, Voodoo 227/233 cam, Holley 950 HP carb, C6 trans, 3.25 trak-loc.
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#9
(07-20-2018, 12:20 PM)TommyK Wrote: Here is an assessment (perhaps biased) of Evans Waterless Coolant. Despite the fact it was commissioned by a competitor I think it raises some interesting points.

https://www.norosion.com/evanstest.htm

Read through the analysis report. Interesting information. I am a bit skeptical based upon it being a competitor marketing their wares.  I am going to see if I can find anything from a neutral reviewer.

BKDunha
72 Mach 1 H-Code (Concourse driven restoration)
67 S-Code Factory GT with 4-Spd

68 Mercury Cyclone (Pro-Street project)
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#10
I read through the report and find some of it reasonable, with valid points, but question some of the others and believe they missed one point.

The missed point is not mentioning that the high-flow water pumps also require more power to drive.

One point I take exception with is their statement about cooling the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. While true that the aircrafts fly in cooler air, the reduction in air pressure at altitude dramatically reduces the boiling temperature. Early R-R Merlin engines did not have pressurised cooling systems, but I believe that in the late '30s all were pressurised. Granted, the original '31 R-R may not have been pressurised, but there's no reason it couldn't have been pressurised when the R-R Merlin was installed.

It also appears No-Rosion was tested using water, only, which provides no freeze protection. I would have been more comfortable with the testing procedure if they had tested it in a 50/50 water-ethylene glycol mix.

One thing they are correct about is the volatility of ethylene glycol antifreeze. Several years ago there were a lot of motor home engine fires that were attributed to leaks in the cooling systems. Due to the high under-hood temperatures the water evaporated out of the coolant as soon as it entered air, leaving the straight ethylene glycol to combust.

These are my main points, but there are others of less concern.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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