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Dremel rotary tool - not so good experience
#1
I am frustrated with the Dremel rotary tools Angry . I am wondering if you have a similar opinion. It has a place in my arsenal of tools. I like it because the ability of grinding and cutting small items or working in limited spaces where the angle grinder does not fit. HOWEVER, my second Dremel just stopped working. I think the switches are junk. My first one lasted about 5 years, but only saw heavy use in its last year. The second one lasted about 2 years of medium/heavy use. The second one was of noticeably lower quality than the first one. If I used it hard for couple minutes it will overheat and stop until it cooled down. At that time I was working grinding and cutting sheetmetal while repairing the cowl in place so I needed a small tool to fit in the confined  space of the cowl. Lately the speed switch was faulty and failing sporadically until it finally gave up. I would like to have a tool small like the Dremel due to the many uses I have for it, but I am hesitant in dropping money again in one of them. I can't remember right now if I had the 300x or 400x Series Dremel (Edit: I had the 3000 Series). Even if I had the 300x I can't see justifying a 400x, unless I hear good reviews. Does any of you have suggestions on higher quality "small" rotary tools or may have other experiences to share?

Edit: I forgot to add that I was having another issue with my second Dremel. About 6 months ago the Mandrel started failing so you couldn't tighten it that much.

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
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#2
(10-25-2018, 01:53 PM)tony-muscle Wrote: I am frustrated with the Dremel rotary tools Angry . I am wondering if you have a similar opinion. It has a place in my arsenal of tools. I like it because the ability of grinding and cutting small items or working in limited spaces where the angle grinder does not fit. HOWEVER, my second Dremel just stopped working. I think the switches are junk. My first one lasted about 5 years, but only saw heavy use in its last year. The second one lasted about 2 years of medium/heavy use. The second one was of noticeably lower quality than the first one. If I used it hard for couple minutes it will overheat and stop until it cooled down. At that time I was working grinding and cutting sheetmetal while repairing the cowl in place so I needed a small tool to fit in the confined  space of the cowl. Lately the speed switch was faulty and failing sporadically until it finally gave up. I would like to have a tool small like the Dremel due to the many uses I have for it, but I am hesitant in dropping money again in one of them. I can't remember right now if I had the 300x or 400x Series Dremel (Edit: I had the 3000 Series). Even if I had the 300x I can't see justifying a 400x, unless I hear good reviews. Does any of you have suggestions on higher quality "small" rotary tools or may have other experiences to share?

Edit: I forgot to add that I was having another issue with my second Dremel. About 6 months ago the Mandrel started failing so you couldn't tighten it that much.


Get a Foredom brand rotary tool.  It will last decades and is much more powerful.
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#3
Fordham is nice.

Cheap vibratory cutting tools also work really well for many of the tasks that you use dremel tools to accomplish. Rotary air grinders (If you have a good air supply) also are pretty handy

[Image: 1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png]

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!
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#4
(10-25-2018, 04:35 PM)Jeff73Mach1 Wrote: Fordham is nice.

Cheap vibratory cutting tools also work really well for many of the tasks that you use dremel tools to accomplish.  Rotary air grinders (If you have a good air supply) also are pretty handy

I guess you get what you pay for. The Fordham definitely looks nice, but it is much more expensive and you have to carry the motor around.

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
  Reply
#5
(10-25-2018, 04:35 PM)Jeff73Mach1 Wrote: Fordham is nice.

Cheap vibratory cutting tools also work really well for many of the tasks that you use dremel tools to accomplish.  Rotary air grinders (If you have a good air supply) also are pretty handy
Did use the Dremel last weekend to cut under the hood in locations my regular cutting tool would have made a way bigger cut.
Handy and did well with its tiny disc, but as I have much more welding/cutting on the todo with likely hard to reach places, I'm  looking at small cutting tools much stronger than the dremel, potentially possible to be held with one secure hand in really limited spaces where they is no other way and think one of these could be very handy.

Any experience with one of these? Are there some properties they should have to be really handy/practical?
https://www.toolots.com/3-pneumatic-cutt...0-rpm.html

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#6
(10-25-2018, 05:27 PM)Fabrice Wrote:
(10-25-2018, 04:35 PM)Jeff73Mach1 Wrote: Fordham is nice.

Cheap vibratory cutting tools also work really well for many of the tasks that you use dremel tools to accomplish.  Rotary air grinders (If you have a good air supply) also are pretty handy
Did use the Dremel last weekend to cut under the hood in locations my regular cutting tool would have made a way bigger cut.
Handy and did well with its tiny disc, but as I have much more welding/cutting on the todo with likely hard to reach places, I'm  looking at small cutting tools much stronger than the dremel, potentially possible to be held with one secure hand in really limited spaces where they is no other way and think one of these could be very handy.

Any experience with one of these? Are there some properties they should have to be really handy/practical?
https://www.toolots.com/3-pneumatic-cutt...0-rpm.html

I used my Dremel in/through tiny spots when I was repairing the cowl. I had to use the angle attachment to reach places where I couldn't rotate the tool. As a disclaimer, the angle attachment is low quality and weak, and although it did the job, it did not last much under heavy duty use. I guess that at the price range of the Dremel tool they are not intended for real duty use Chin  Chin . The Foredom rotary tool looks like a good option for small spaces but I have no experience with it. I just learn of it from Bentworker's post.

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
  Reply
#7
I just bought a Dremel 4000 but haven't had a chance to try it out yet.  I did pick up a speed chuck attachment so hopefully that bypasses any issues with the mandrel.

[Image: 1gq8uo.png]
1971 Mach 1 - 306cid/C4 Bright Yellow
"Just relax, I've got a friend named Felix who can fix anything!" ~James Bond
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#8
Dremels are not a heavy duty tool, never have been. They're best suited for hobby and craft use, with the occasional heavier job. I have several, one is about twenty years old, others are between 10~15. My primary use for them is my r/c aircraft hobby, but I keep one in my tool box for automotive use.


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#9
I worked as a tool & die maker for many years. When building molds you use small pencil grinders a lot and the brand Foredom was all I ever saw in a shop. The Dremel is a toy for the sometime hobby person.
Here is link to one supplier of their products. You can get heads that use split collets and also three jaw chuck like a regular drill uses. You have a flexible shaft with a drive motor with some beef to it not a toy.
I worked in one shop for 16 or 18 years with at least a dozen guys using the same one and it never failed. Had to replace the flex shaft but drive never. It is like a speedo cable. You hang from a hook or lay on surface. We had 5 gallon bucket with cement in it with a piece of pipe and a hook that swiveled for ours.
Not cheap but you get what you pay for here. Not saying this is the best place to buy either just a quick look up on the net.
https://www.travers.com/flexible-shaft-m...sories/p/8
BTW when doing contract work we quoted stuff for Ryobi who also makes lots of Craftsman hand power tools. They said the design life for those type tools is 10 hours of use. They said that over 90% bought and used a couple times and just sat. So when you buy those tools do not expect them to last a lifetime they are for home use not commercial big difference.


When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
Tongue
David
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#10
I bought the cheapest Dremmel brand tool when I started my J Code vert restoration a few year's back. It saw a fair amount of work and to date, has been great...
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