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distributor re-install question
#1
Hi folks, pulled out my distributor last month so I can paint the engine. I put marks on the block before I pulled the distributor out, but when I went to re-install it the distributor shaft gear rotated, don't know how much, but can that throw my timing off ? It's GM style, one wire Mallory brand distributor. I guess I should've marked the rotor as well before pulling it out. Any suggestions before I crank this pony up?
Thanks,
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#2
Rotate your engine until the timing mark is is on zero. Pull #1 spark plug and with a stiff piece of wire verify that #1 is at the top. Or, you can have someone put their finger over the #1 hole and they will feel the compression stroke. Depends on if you have help. Then install the distributer and verify that the rotor is pointing at #1 plug wire. Then after starting reset your timing.

[Image: 2rr7aiv.png]

Just cruising along minding our own business when BAM!!! The LAWS show up.
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#3
sharpstang72;32190 Wrote:Hi folks, pulled out my distributor last month so I can paint the engine. I put marks on the block before I pulled the distributor out, but when I went to re-install it the distributor shaft gear rotated, don't know how much, but can that throw my timing off ? It's GM style, one wire Mallory brand distributor. I guess I should've marked the rotor as well before pulling it out. Any suggestions before I crank this pony up?
Thanks,
The goal is to have the timing pointer indicating near TDC at the end of the compression stroke, as opposed to the exhaust stroke, and the rotor pointing to the wire for cylinder #1, and get the distributor gear, the gear on the cam, and the hex oil pump drive rod to all line up. You will need to be able to rotate the engine (15/16 socket on damper retaining bolt, starter bump switch, or a lot of back and forth with the starter switch). You will also need a way to know when #1 piston is near TDC just as the intake valve closes ( pull valve cover watch intake rocker movement, or remove #1 spark plug use and monitor cylinder pressure rise as crank is rotated to near TDC, DO NOT STICK YOUR FINGER IN THE SPARK PLUG HOLE! Mark the distributor housing where #1 wire would normally be, install the rotor. Try to install the distributor beginning with the rotor a bit CCW from where you want it to end up as it will rotate CW as the 2 gears completely mesh IF the oil pump drive rod hex hole in the distributor shaft and oil pump drive rod are lined up (doesn't happen often). If the distributor will partially engage but not completely seat you can use the bump the starter method described in the service manual or you can move the drive rod a bit at a time (1/4 drive, 5/16 socket and long extension taped together so they can not separate) until the distributor fully seats. It is pretty easy to be "one tooth off". If it is, the engine will likely start but run very poorly and you won't be able to set the timing properly. Be patient. If it doesn't work the first time, take a break and then go again. You will get there. Chuck
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#4
c9zx;32193 Wrote:
sharpstang72;32190 Wrote:Hi folks, pulled out my distributor last month so I can paint the engine. I put marks on the block before I pulled the distributor out, but when I went to re-install it the distributor shaft gear rotated, don't know how much, but can that throw my timing off ? It's GM style, one wire Mallory brand distributor. I guess I should've marked the rotor as well before pulling it out. Any suggestions before I crank this pony up?
Thanks,
The goal is to have the timing pointer indicating near TDC at the end of the compression stroke, as opposed to the exhaust stroke, and the rotor pointing to the wire for cylinder #1, and get the distributor gear, the gear on the cam, and the hex oil pump drive rod to all line up. You will need to be able to rotate the engine (15/16 socket on damper retaining bolt, starter bump switch, or a lot of back and forth with the starter switch). You will also need a way to know when #1 piston is near TDC just as the intake valve closes ( pull valve cover watch intake rocker movement, or remove #1 spark plug use and monitor cylinder pressure rise as crank is rotated to near TDC, DO NOT STICK YOUR FINGER IN THE SPARK PLUG HOLE! Mark the distributor housing where #1 wire would normally be, install the rotor. Try to install the distributor beginning with the rotor a bit CCW from where you want it to end up as it will rotate CW as the 2 gears completely mesh IF the oil pump drive rod hex hole in the distributor shaft and oil pump drive rod are lined up (doesn't happen often). If the distributor will partially engage but not completely seat you can use the bump the starter method described in the service manual or you can move the drive rod a bit at a time (1/4 drive, 5/16 socket and long extension taped together so they can not separate) until the distributor fully seats. It is pretty easy to be "one tooth off". If it is, the engine will likely start but run very poorly and you won't be able to set the timing properly. Be patient. If it doesn't work the first time, take a break and then go again. You will get there. Chuck
OVER the hole not in the hole.


[Image: 2rr7aiv.png]

Just cruising along minding our own business when BAM!!! The LAWS show up.
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#5
depending on how much access you have to the crank:

the fool proof way is put a breaker bar on the crank set #1 on the distributor, set TDC on the compression stroke for Cyl #1
place the distributor in it will most likely get hung up on the oil pump shaft, rock the breaker bar back and forth to turn the distributor gear a little and Pop, the distributor will fall right in. move the breaker bar line up TDC and confirm the distributor rotor is right on your mark(that you placed lining up the rotor cap) and your good to set the timing.

the pain in the butt way is using a remote starter switch, keep bumping the engine over until your as close as possible to TDC on the compression stroke, line up the distributor on your #1 mark, drop it into the engine. Bump the engine over to get the distributor onto the oil pump shaft(hope nothing gets hung up, or you get to drop your oil pan, for a new pump shaft, which means motor comes out if its a 302 or 351) the distributor will suck down on the engine, then you discover your 1 tooth off from where you want to be and get to start over.

i've been through all the different ways. from now on, my fan comes out and my fan shroud comes out and i do it manually no more starter bumping.
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#6
Since you have an aftermarket distributor it isn't makred which one is '#1'. Basically, once you know you are on the top of the compression stroke, you can install the distributor and where ever the rotor is pointing can be you #1 spark plug.

'Mike'
73 Convertible - 351C/4V CC heads/4bolt/forged flat tops/comp 270/rhodes/mallory unilite/tri-power/hookers/glasspacks/c6/3.50 limited slip/Gear Vendors/Global West sub frames, strut rods and shelby style traction bars/ Rear sway bar/tilt steering (not original)

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