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Differences between Dearborn and Metuchen '71 Mustangs?
#1
During the boom years, Mustang was assembled in 3 plants: Dearborn, MI (F), San Jose, Ca ®, and Metuchen, NJ (T).

San Jose ceased Mustang production in July of 1970, so I am pretty sure no 71 Mustangs were made there.

Metuchen shut down Mustang production on December 23rd, 1970 so there were obviously some 71s made there before production ceased there.

Does anyone know the differences between the Metuchen and Dearborn cars as far as assembly details go?
I know the trunk paint on the BOSS 351s was considerably different between those two plants, but that is all I have ever heard.

Any other tidbits floating around out there?
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#2
Seems like I heard that the Metuchen plant cars did NOT have the build sheets left in the car, but I don't recall where I heard that probably another Mustang site. But that is just something I recall hearing and is no way a fact. Anyone else heard of that.
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#3
Kit Sullivan;167003 Wrote:During the boom years, Mustang was assembled in 3 plants: Dearborn, MI (F), San Jose, Ca ®, and Metuchen, NJ (T).
San Jose ceased Mustang production in July of 1970, so I am pretty sure no 71 Mustangs were made there.
Metuchen shut down Mustang production on December 23rd, 1970 so there were obviously some 71s made there before production ceased there.
Does anyone know the differences between the Metuchen and Dearborn cars as far as assembly details go?
I know the trunk paint on the BOSS 351s was considerably different between those two plants, but that is all I have ever heard.

Kit - maybe for another thread but what is the Dearborn/Metuchen Boss paint diff? New to me but I have never really thought about it much. THX

Ray



1971 Boss 351
1972 Q code 4 speed convertible
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#4
The inside lower corners of the trunk "trough" have a diagonal line between the black and body color paint, whereas the twin has a more squared off masking treatment, plus the placement of the stripe along the trunk lid was slightly higher up on one of them.

I too heard of a Mustang going through a rotisserie resto and under the rear carpets was found a stack of many build sheets for several vehicles. It appeared that a line worker just tossed the whole stack into one car.

In my 90 MK VII LSC, I found a 5-page random road test and quality inspection report up inside the headliner. It was a very thorough inspection form that tested for wind and water leaks, panel gaps, upholstery seam alignment, switch and latch operation and smoothness, glass clarity in specific spots, steering wheel squeak, door panel "breathing" with power window operation, headlamp and "roadlamp" aim, auto lamp and auto dim function at specific brightness levels, air suspension noise and time-to-trim, and a whole bunch of other more mundane and expected checks.
There were two inspectors names on the report, and there were two areas checkex as "do not ship with" stamps: The lumpy bodywork under the paint on the sail panel ( not fixed...still on the car to this day!) and a notchy sunvisor hinge. Apparently that was fixed.
It was a pretty impressive inspection, and I think they randomly tested one car pulled from the end of the line for each shift.
  Reply
#5
Kit Sullivan;167003 Wrote:During the boom years, Mustang was assembled in 3 plants: Dearborn, MI (F), San Jose, Ca ®, and Metuchen, NJ (T).

San Jose ceased Mustang production in July of 1970, so I am pretty sure no 71 Mustangs were made there.

Metuchen shut down Mustang production on December 23rd, 1970 so there were obviously some 71s made there before production ceased there.

Does anyone know the differences between the Metuchen and Dearborn cars as far as assembly details go?
I know the trunk paint on the BOSS 351s was considerably different between those two plants, but that is all I have ever heard.

Any other tidbits floating around out there?

Kit,

You must have been on the Mustang assembly line in a previous life! You do know a lot about these cars and it it truly interesting stuff for these 40+ year old cars. I know that the 429 cars were all supposedly built at Dearborn. I did not know about the Boss 351 cars being built at other plants. Were they?

I never get tired of reading all the trivia concerning our cars.
  Reply
#6
My '71 is a Metuchen job.

Some junk sound deadener had been thrown under the carpet:

[Image: 71_mustang_27.jpg]

I did find this build sheet, but I haven't bothered to see if anything on it indicating whether it is for my car or not:

[Image: 71_mustang_50.jpg]

[Image: 71_mustang_51.jpg]

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
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#7
I have just been immersed in Fords and Mustangs ever since I was a little kid, and especially the big-boy 71-73s.
I have always had an unnatural ( maybe unhealthy?) thirst for minutia and other trivial information, so over the years I've seen, heard, read about and resesrched some of the most minor of facts about our cars. Stuff most people would never care about.
I'm just a detail-oriented guy, and I have always been fascinated with puzzling things out. I love things of a mechanical nature, and things that lean more towards an organic status as opposed to synthetic. Real wood over plastic veneer. Carbs instead of EFI. Automatic watches instead of quartz.
Hard to explain...I'm just a generation (or two ) behind and I like the stuff that took human hands and minds to create, not something a mindless machine stamps out by the thousands.
I love these old cars for what they are and what they represent about the ers they wrre created in. I know they are as archaic as an old ox-cart compared to "modern muscle", but they have a charm and a grit all thier own.

Kind of like the space race and the moon landings back in the late 60s/ early 70s: it is absolutely preposterous to think we could ever have even thought about such a journey with the ultra-low tech stone-age technology we had back then, but somehow we actually did it!
Today, with all the known dangers and outright knowledge and computer-generated "probabilities of success" along with our best tech, I dont really think we could succesfully complete a moon landing. We know to much to try something so foolish.
Back then, we were too stupid to know we could'nt do it, so we just did...somehow.

These cars are like that. We were too stupid to realize that drum brakes and bias-ply tires combined with 400 horses was a sure-fire recipe for disaster...even death. But we made them anyway, and they are each and every one of them glorious in thier own, childish and foolhardy way. I love them all.
  Reply
#8
Kit Sullivan;167095 Wrote:I have just been immersed in Fords and Mustangs ever since I was a little kid, and especially the big-boy 71-73s.
I have always had an unnatural ( maybe unhealthy?) thirst for minutia and other trivial information, so over the years I've seen, heard, read about and resesrched some of the most minor of facts about our cars. Stuff most people would never care about.
I'm just a detail-oriented guy, and I have always been fascinated with puzzling things out. I love things of a mechanical nature, and things that lean more towards an organic status as opposed to synthetic. Real wood over plastic veneer. Carbs instead of EFI. Automatic watches instead of quartz.
Hard to explain...I'm just a generation (or two ) behind and I like the stuff that took human hands and minds to create, not something a mindless machine stamps out by the thousands.
I love these old cars for what they are and what they represent about the ers they wrre created in. I know they are as archaic as an old ox-cart compared to "modern muscle", but they have a charm and a grit all thier own.

Kind of like the space race and the moon landings back in the late 60s/ early 70s: it is absolutely preposterous to think we could ever have even thought about such a journey with the ultra-low tech stone-age technology we had back then, but somehow we actually did it!
Today, with all the known dangers and outright knowledge and computer-generated "probabilities of success" along with our best tech, I dont really think we could succesfully complete a moon landing. We know to much to try something so foolish.
Back then, we were too stupid to know we could'nt do it, so we just did...somehow.

These cars are like that. We were too stupid to realize that drum brakes and bias-ply tires combined with 400 horses was a sure-fire recipe for disaster...even death. But we made them anyway, and they are each and every one of them glorious in thier own, childish and foolhardy way. I love them all.

I could not agree more. Well said, my car is fully restored with so far only minor things to fix or missing rare parts to find, but it drives like a 71 Mach 1 did back in 1971. There is no changing that unless you go "pro touring" where you mostly have the look but lots of modern modifications.

I wanted what I had in the seventies and fully remember how cars drove back then. It is such a transition to park my Mach 1 after a drive and then move my 2013 Chevy Tahoe PPV out of the way to put the Mustang in the garage. It truly is like traveling into the future or returning from the past in a worm hole.

I love my Mustang for what it is and what it was back in the day when it was a force to be reckoned with!
  Reply
#9
Kit Sullivan;167003 Wrote:During the boom years, Mustang was assembled in 3 plants: Dearborn, MI (F), San Jose, Ca ®, and Metuchen, NJ (T).

San Jose ceased Mustang production in July of 1970, so I am pretty sure no 71 Mustangs were made there.

Metuchen shut down Mustang production on December 23rd, 1970 so there were obviously some 71s made there before production ceased there.

I found this interesting. My car was manufactured on December 7th in Metuchen. I did not previously know this, but I guess, based on your post, it was manufactured during that last month. Mine was restored 12 years ago so i don't know if the build sheets are under the carpet. This winter I am taking a lot of the interior out so I will check for any signs of it.



        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
4-wheel disc brakes
  Reply
#10
tony-muscle;203679 Wrote:
Kit Sullivan;167003 Wrote:During the boom years, Mustang was assembled in 3 plants: Dearborn, MI (F), San Jose, Ca ®, and Metuchen, NJ (T).

San Jose ceased Mustang production in July of 1970, so I am pretty sure no 71 Mustangs were made there.

Metuchen shut down Mustang production on December 23rd, 1970 so there were obviously some 71s made there before production ceased there.

I found this interesting. My car was manufactured on December 7th in Metuchen. I did not previously know this, but I guess, based on your post, it was manufactured during that last month. Mine was restored 12 years ago so i don't know if the build sheets are under the carpet. This winter I am taking a lot of the interior out so I will check for any signs of it.

I am betting that there was something if not a lot found when your car was restored. Just like mine, however it was not passed on to the next owner. This is something that really bothers me about old cars. Not everyone passes this stuff on when the car is sold. Why? What is the point of keeping it. Make a copy or take a picture and keep that. We owe it to the "car" in my opinion to give this stuff to the next "caretaker" of the car.

I have been in contact with one past owner of my car with only the promise of sending me some of the stuff he kept. I am still waiting by the mailbox for that stuff. I even offered to pay all expenses for the items. Still, I wait but will never see anything.

Am I the only one that feels this way? I have no intention of keeping anything when/if I sell my car. If I am dead and still have the car my wife knows exactly what I want to happen with my car and everything having to do with my car.
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