• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Coupe Rear Glass Area Designed To Rot
#1
So I had a small spot of rust by the rear glass area I decided to check out today.

After 3 hrs grinding out 1/2 inch of filler in both corners found the rot.

What a dumb design! When water gets under the rear window stainless trim where does it go NOWHERE!
Till it rusts a hole in the steel then it will drain inside the trunk.
The sheet metal at the bottom of the glass area is low and will always hold water what a dumb design.

Oh well patch panels will fix it.

Anyone with a coupe should check this area for rust.



[Image: x3e155.jpg]




[Image: 2nbr6kw.jpg]

73 Grandé
351C 2v
Now 4v Carb/Cam/headers/T5


Gasoline is for washing parts.
Alcohol is for drinking.
Nitomethane is for racing!



Work in Progress photos here:
Last Update: 4/23/16

http://s1270.photobucket.com/user/theroc...t=3&page=1






















  Reply
#2
Quite normal on just about any car of the period or earlier. It's just something one has to put up with - the design of a window channel is inherently a water trap.

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
  Reply
#3
It was called "planned obsolescence" places were planned into cars to trap water and road grime causing rust in visible areas. It made you want to buy a new car sooner. It's also why they changed every year.

Jeff T.

Low buck, touring style, '73 Convertible "rolling restoration", 351c, 2v heads with a shave and a haircut, Performer intake, Holley 650(ish), roller rockers, screw in studs, guideplates, stainless valves, Duraspark / Motorsports MSD, T-5 conversion. 1-1/8" front, 3/4" rear swaybars KYB shocks and some home brewed subframe connectors. Future plans; JGC steering box, Cobra brakes and... paint, interior, etc.

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passenger.

[Image: 1_12_09_14_10_15_11.png]
  Reply
#4
Makes me want to check mine after seeing this and Mason's car. I haven't seen any visible rust anywhere around the window but it could be well covered. Wouldn't surprise me after seeing other repairs.
I think it should be a federal rule for documentation of where bondo was applied and kept inside of the car for ever so someone 20 years later can know where all the filler is. It's like a dang Easter egg hunt except you don't get happy when you find some.
  Reply
#5
matrixx;190806 Wrote:It's like a dang Easter egg hunt except you don't get happy when you find some.

That's why we have the Shooters Award. It's advance warning to cheap bodyshops Tongue

-Kurt

[Image: satellite-valiant-mustang-license-tags-signature.png]
How to buy a '71-73 Mustang:
Rule #1: Assume all classic car sellers are guilty until proven innocent.
Rule #2: No classic car dealer is ever innocent; thus, they are all guilty.
Rule #3: Buy from trustworthy people: Fellow forum members. Visit 7173Mustang's For Sale forum.
  Reply
#6
Same potential issue with the 7173 Cougar. You just need to drive faster to get that water pushed out of there!
  Reply
#7
I wouldn't so much call it "planned obsolecence"...purposely designing the car to rot away quickly...as I would just say that they designed the cars with very little or no care about rust prevention, as the product was really intended to have about a 4-6 year "shelf life". Back then a typical 10 year old car was a resident of the local scrap yard.
  Reply
#8
(08-05-2014, 08:44 AM)Kit Sullivan Wrote: I wouldn't so much call it "planned obsolecence"...purposely designing the car to rot away quickly...as I would just say that they designed the cars with very little or no care about rust prevention, as the product was really intended to have about a 4-6 year "shelf life". Back then a typical 10 year old car was a resident of the local scrap yard.

Makes you wonder where the " they don't build them like they used to" phrase originated. Sounds like they were pretty crappy then.
  Reply
#9
Yes, I have always wondered about the phrase myself. I think it was more in reference to cars built in the 40s-50s...now those cars had bodys and frames that were solid as tanks, and just as heavy. But they did last a long time...its just the rest of the parts of those cars that didn't last: soft trim and such.
Cars got cheaply made beginning in the 50s, more so in the 60s and the 70s was the nadir...the ultimate craptastic cars ever made. It takes extraordinary effort to make a typical 70s car last over 40 years.
But everything in cars has improved over the years: better paint, better soft trim, more durable plastics, better manufacturing and assembly methods...you name it.
I think cars today are far better for the most part, but obviously cheaper in a few too obvious ways.

I wonder...is there a category for restorations that requires only period-correct parts, chemicals and techniques that were specific to the time-frame of the car's original manufacture?
Even if done meticulously, would a 71 Mustang restored in that fashion, with single-stage enamel over old-style primer, 71-era vinyl-stripe technology, etc...how would that car compare to another 72 using all of today's advanced techniques and supplies?
  Reply
#10
Kit Sullivan;190872 Wrote:I wouldn't so much call it "planned obsolecence"...purposely designing the car to rot away quickly...as I would just say that they designed the cars with very little or no care about rust prevention, as the product was really intended to have about a 4-6 year "shelf life". Back then a typical 10 year old car was a resident of the local scrap yard.

I agree with Kit's assessment. Back then they didn't have the 100,000 mile rust through warranty that they have on today's cars so it probably wasn't one of their highest concerns then. These issues probably was a factor on designing changes today to prevent the rust plus better materials today.

-john
(jbojo)
351C 4V cc heads, 10.5 : 1 CR, 290 Herbert cam, Flat top forged pistons, forged connecting rods, Atomic efi,
C6 with Gear Vendor overdrive, 3.89 Tru Trac, Hooker Super Comp with 2 1/2" Pypes Exhaust.        

Some Mod pictures can be seen at:

  Reply
Share Thread:  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Beginnings 72 Coupe Resto OzCoupe72 52 5,319 12-15-2018, 07:00 PM
Last Post: OzCoupe72
  73 Coupe JRANGER 42 2,479 11-30-2018, 06:33 PM
Last Post: 73pony
  72 Grandé Coupe project, starting Fall 2017! vikingsandpintos 15 1,978 08-12-2018, 09:53 PM
Last Post: Boss1Ray
runninpony 71 Coupe 460/T56 Jkelchner4 25 2,999 05-24-2018, 05:00 AM
Last Post: TommyK
  73 Coupe - SA Edition shaheenk 2 645 01-06-2018, 11:27 AM
Last Post: rackerm
  1973 Mustang Coupe to Convertible Conversion M Beauchamp 34 16,819 11-22-2017, 06:37 AM
Last Post: NOT A T5
  more pics of the progress of the coupe pedstagn71 60 9,071 07-21-2017, 12:31 AM
Last Post: mach71351c
  1971 Coupe resto-mod mustaguar 103 21,055 01-07-2017, 05:00 AM
Last Post: mustaguar



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)