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Console Clock restoration / repair
#31
(06-27-2017, 07:03 AM)Stanglover Wrote:
(06-26-2017, 09:02 PM)goodnigh Wrote: Here is Sam's schematic, feel free to build one.
It can be made about the size of a Zippo lighter.
Coils are fired by the capacitor bank, no direct
connection to battery.  No fried coils or burnt points.

https://www.repairfaq.org/sam/sgmccsch.pdf

mike

 Interesting Mike, but that's over my head!! Maybe some one can build me one. Nuts and bolts I'm fine with, but wires............ not so much!

I have a plan.  Have an extra clock that is not quite right.  Where is that
place to send a clock for repair?  I think I saw $50.  Then we build Sam's
gadget and add it to the clock.  My mechanic was an Air Force electronics
tech in the 70's and 80's, this is child's play.  Parts maybe $10.  So far I am
out $60 and have two modified, only two on the planet, working Mustang
clocks.  I send you the modified one and you send me yours to modify.  And
we do it again.

mike
  Reply
#32
(06-30-2017, 02:35 AM)goodnigh Wrote:
(06-27-2017, 07:03 AM)Stanglover Wrote:
(06-26-2017, 09:02 PM)goodnigh Wrote: Here is Sam's schematic, feel free to build one.
It can be made about the size of a Zippo lighter.
Coils are fired by the capacitor bank, no direct
connection to battery.  No fried coils or burnt points.

https://www.repairfaq.org/sam/sgmccsch.pdf

mike

 Interesting Mike, but that's over my head!! Maybe some one can build me one. Nuts and bolts I'm fine with, but wires............ not so much!

I have a plan.  Have an extra clock that is not quite right.  Where is that
place to send a clock for repair?  I think I saw $50.  Then we build Sam's
gadget and add it to the clock.  My mechanic was an Air Force electronics
tech in the 70's and 80's, this is child's play.  Parts maybe $10.  So far I am
out $60 and have two modified, only two on the planet, working Mustang
clocks.  I send you the modified one and you send me yours to modify.  And
we do it again.

mike
   Mike, not following you on "where is that place to send a clock for repair" Perhaps I missed something.
So you know a guy who can build this "gadget" and add it to a now working Mustang clock. Where does it get power if no direct contact to the battery? If this idea is viable, it may be worth looking at IF I/we can get non-working clocks cheap enough. Am I following you correctly ?
Maybe go to a PM on this.
Geoff.
  Reply
#33
(06-30-2017, 08:54 AM)Stanglover Wrote:
(06-30-2017, 02:35 AM)goodnigh Wrote:
(06-27-2017, 07:03 AM)Stanglover Wrote:  Interesting Mike, but that's over my head!! Maybe some one can build me one. Nuts and bolts I'm fine with, but wires............ not so much!

I have a plan.  Have an extra clock that is not quite right.  Where is that
place to send a clock for repair?  I think I saw $50.  Then we build Sam's
gadget and add it to the clock.  My mechanic was an Air Force electronics
tech in the 70's and 80's, this is child's play.  Parts maybe $10.  So far I am
out $60 and have two modified, only two on the planet, working Mustang
clocks.  I send you the modified one and you send me yours to modify.  And
we do it again.

mike
   Mike, not following you on "where is that place to send a clock for repair" Perhaps I missed something.
So you know a guy who can build this "gadget" and add it to a now working Mustang clock. Where does it get power if no direct contact to the battery? If this idea is viable, it may be worth looking at IF I/we can get non-working clocks cheap enough. Am I following you correctly ?
Maybe go to a PM on this.
Geoff.

In Sam's schematic the capacitor bank is connected to the battery and not the coils, at least not directly.
When the spring winds down and closes the points in the original design that would fire the coils turning
them into electromagnets and activating a "hammer" that would knock the mainspring back to start over.
When the mainspring ran down and the points touched, repeat series.  Problem being when the points
occasionally stuck together it would fry the coils, full battery power on a dead short.
In Sam's design the coils are connected to a capacitor bank.  When the points contact the bank discharges
and fires the coils to drive the hammer and mainspring.  If the points where to stick somehow, no problem.
The capacitor bank cannot be recharged until the connection is broken.  Dead in the water, no smoke.

mike
  Reply
#34
(06-23-2017, 09:10 AM)NG8264723 Wrote: I had mine repaired
Click to enlarge
Clock Servicing - Ford, Lincoln, Mercury OEM movement 1964-1973
Don't want to lose the classic movement of your factory clock by converting to quartz? Let me repair, clean and adjust the original movement. I can perform minor repairs to the movement for less than half of a conversion. If your original movement is not repairable I have a stock of repaired OEM units so I can replace the entire movement if necessary.

•If I can't fix your clock I only charge $10.00 for diagnosis and refund the rest of the service charge.
•Price includes a NEW set of contacts. The contacts are the most failure prone part of these clocks.
•If any other parts are needed you will be contacted before any work is done.
•Clock repair requires the core clock be complete and have a working set mechanism (used to set the time).
•Purchase a new lens from me and I will install it free of charge.
•Repaired clocks have a 2 year repair or refund warranty.

Available?  I need your clock. Estimated Turn-around is 10 business days between receipt of your clock and return shipping.




Clock Service
$50.00
 Where do I send the clock for repair?

mike
  Reply
#35
What kills the clocks is long term storage without a battery tender.
When the car battery dies it reaches a point where the battery doesn't have enough power to run the coils in the clock. The contacts that open and close for the coils gets stuck closed, that charges the coil but it doesn't have enough power to magnetically throw the contact to discharge. So the coil burns out usually right at the end of the connection. That kills the clock. If you are good with soldering you can unwind the lacquered coil that burned out 1/2 turn and resolder the coil connection that burned out and get the clock going again.
The trick is leaving the battery on a minder all the time preventing the battery from getting weak and killing the clock
  Reply
#36
runninpony 
+1 on Rocketman! +1 on a Battery Tender too! I had my fair share with my clock even frying my battery, after the car sat for a few days,  got it replaced under warranty whistling and a few months later the battery boiled over while driving down the Autobahn at a "decent" speed whistling , needless to say it left nice acid etchings on over half the engine compartment Angry ALL THAT CHROME...RUINED Shootself By the time I pulled over it was too late! I'm not saying it was caused by the clock but some gremlins were working under my hood devil ! This all happened in the mid 90's!  Cool
  Reply
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