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Computer Question
#1
Long story short, my mouse quit working.
Was doing an install of "recommended" driver
updates and the mouse quit working. Says
"click" here to finish install. Problem being
can't "click". This computer being five years
old I decided to buy a new one. The question,
can I remove the SATA drive from the old computer
and install in the new one? Already grabbed the
8GB RAM memory module. They are both bootable
drives. In past times you would need to change a
switch or jumper.

mike

[Image: 1_11_11_13_11_50_27.png]
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#2
Are you trying to make the new system dual boot or using the SATA drive as extra storage? If the answer is extra storage and there is no data that you want off the drive just reformat it and plug it into any available SATA port and it will work.

When your mouse stopped did you plug it into another port if it was a USB mouse? The system would have scanned the new device and re-enabled it or you could have done a couple of CNTRL-ALT-DEL to do a reboot and the updates would have installed and reset the mouse.

-john
(jbojo)
351C 4V cc heads, 10.5 : 1 CR, 290 Herbert cam, Flat top forged pistons, forged connecting rods, Atomic efi,
C6 with Gear Vendor overdrive, 3.89 Tru Trac, Hooker Super Comp with 2 1/2" Pypes Exhaust.        

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#3
goodnigh;288314 Wrote:Long story short, my mouse quit working.
Was doing an install of "recommended" driver
updates and the mouse quit working. Says
"click" here to finish install. Problem being
can't "click". This computer being five years
old I decided to buy a new one. The question,
can I remove the SATA drive from the old computer
and install in the new one? Already grabbed the
8GB RAM memory module. They are both bootable
drives. In past times you would need to change a
switch or jumper.

mike

You should be able to "click" with the keyboard. Try pressing the "tab" key until the button you want clicked is highlighted, at that time press "Enter" and that should be equivalent to clicking.

You should be able to install the drive from the old computer into the new computer, not to boot the computer, but to read the data. I don't think the drive would work as a bootable drive unless it is a similarly configured computer.

        [Image: 20160929_171923_edit2_small.jpg]

1971 M-Code Mach 1 w/Ram Air, 408 stroker, 285/291 0.558" roller cam, Blue Thunder intake, TKO600, Hooker headers with electric cut-offs, FiTech EFI w/ RobBMC PowerSurge pump
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#4
OK, when you say "new computer," do you mean you got a whole new computer, with it's own hard drive and operating system already installed? I ask because I typically buy pieces parts and put my own stuff together - I've never actually owned a completely put-together store-bought turn-key machine (except for a few laptops, of course).

The Master/Slave (or PRI/SEC) jumpers are holdovers from the days of EIDE/IDE drives. SATA drives are typically controlled by the SATA ports through the motherboard's BIOS.

If your new computer is indeed a complete machine, put the old drive into the new computer in one of the numerically higher SATA ports, get into the BIOS and ensure the Boot Order does not include that SATA port. That's it.

You could use the old drive to boot the machine, if you have Windows 7 or newer - the newer OSs are fairly adaptive to new equipment... but I don't recommend booting from the 'old' drive, either.

Also, don't blow out any of the old OS files on the 'old' drive until you're satisfied you've recovered all of your data. They're just taking up space since your machine is running off the new 'C' drive.

FWIW: I keep a wired set of USB devices (keyboard and mouse) just for the specific purpose of if my wireless junk quits, whether because of dead batteries or whatever. Usually, when a BT or RF wireless device quits, it's because of loss of signal or power - restoring the signal and/or power usually fixes the issue, but in the meantime plugging a wired device in usually gets me through the outage.

The keyboard solution Tony mentioned usually works as well.

Hope this helps.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#5
I've done this in the past and found that in order to gain access I needed to "take ownership" of the folders and subfolders of the data files I wanted to recover. I think it depends on which folders and how security was set up on the old machine...but something to keep in mind.
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#6
Yeah, that's a Windows thing. With all Windows OSs, your accounts are created with individual SIDs (Security IDs), and normally, files with 'personal' security settings are not easy to 'take control/ownership of' (through older OSs, like XP and older). Windows 7 and newer, it's easier (if you have 'admin rights') to 'take ownership' of all files on a non-OS hard drive volume, even if the SIDs don't match - but you have to be an 'admin' on the OS running your machine, though.

Whenever I roll over to a new version of an OS, reload the OS, tech-refresh my computers, or whatever, I make a new folder on a non-OS hard drive and copy all of the files in my user account folder before logging off and doing whatever. That way, I have a clean copy of all my stuff in a non-personalized [security] directory on a neutral drive. When I log in with the new SID the first time, it's just a matter of replacing the empty space in the new user account folders with the contents from the copies I made (Favorites, Contacts, etc.).

It's crazy the things we do and how it becomes so 'meh' over time and repetition. I remember the first time I had to reload Windows 95 - I was terrified I was going to lose all my e-mails, Favorites, desktop wallpapers, etc.... then a friend told me to back everything up, quit being a baby, and just do it - I'm a computer maintenance technician, after all! Wow - that's all I needed, and that was 20 years ago. Ain't skeered a' nuthin' anymo'. Wink thumb

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#7
jbojo;288324 Wrote:Are you trying to make the new system dual boot or using the SATA drive as extra storage? If the answer is extra storage and there is no data that you want off the drive just reformat it and plug it into any available SATA port and it will work.

When your mouse stopped did you plug it into another port if it was a USB mouse? The system would have scanned the new device and re-enabled it or you could have done a couple of CNTRL-ALT-DEL to do a reboot and the updates would have installed and reset the mouse.

The "old" SATA drive has files I want. Seems easier than using the
backup drive, just pluck the files.

The keyboard is USB and I did try a couple different ports for the
mouse. It is a driver issue.

mike
  Reply
#8
tony-muscle;288329 Wrote:You should be able to "click" with the keyboard. Try pressing the "tab" key until the button you want clicked is highlighted, at that time press "Enter" and that should be equivalent to clicking.

You should be able to install the drive from the old computer into the new computer, not to boot the computer, but to read the data. I don't think the drive would work as a bootable drive unless it is a similarly configured computer.

The system on both drives is Win7. Just pulled the "old" drive.
It is a Seagate Barracuda 1000GB. There are no switches or
jumpers like the old days. So how will the computer know which
drive to boot off?

mike
  Reply
#9
Mister 4x4;288365 Wrote:OK, when you say "new computer," do you mean you got a whole new computer, with it's own hard drive and operating system already installed? I ask because I typically buy pieces parts and put my own stuff together - I've never actually owned a completely put-together store-bought turn-key machine (except for a few laptops, of course).

The Master/Slave (or PRI/SEC) jumpers are holdovers from the days of EIDE/IDE drives. SATA drives are typically controlled by the SATA ports through the motherboard's BIOS.

If your new computer is indeed a complete machine, put the old drive into the new computer in one of the numerically higher SATA ports, get into the BIOS and ensure the Boot Order does not include that SATA port. That's it.

You could use the old drive to boot the machine, if you have Windows 7 or newer - the newer OSs are fairly adaptive to new equipment... but I don't recommend booting from the 'old' drive, either.

Also, don't blow out any of the old OS files on the 'old' drive until you're satisfied you've recovered all of your data. They're just taking up space since your machine is running off the new 'C' drive.

FWIW: I keep a wired set of USB devices (keyboard and mouse) just for the specific purpose of if my wireless junk quits, whether because of dead batteries or whatever. Usually, when a BT or RF wireless device quits, it's because of loss of signal or power - restoring the signal and/or power usually fixes the issue, but in the meantime plugging a wired device in usually gets me through the outage.

The keyboard solution Tony mentioned usually works as well.

Hope this helps.

Thanks, got it.
Just make sure the BIOS is setup. I think get a one second "hit F2"
message on powerup. Great advice.

mike
  Reply
#10
Mister 4x4;288365 Wrote:OK, when you say "new computer," do you mean you got a whole new computer, with it's own hard drive and operating system already installed? I ask because I typically buy pieces parts and put my own stuff together - I've never actually owned a completely put-together store-bought turn-key machine (except for a few laptops, of course).

The Master/Slave (or PRI/SEC) jumpers are holdovers from the days of EIDE/IDE drives. SATA drives are typically controlled by the SATA ports through the motherboard's BIOS.

If your new computer is indeed a complete machine, put the old drive into the new computer in one of the numerically higher SATA ports, get into the BIOS and ensure the Boot Order does not include that SATA port. That's it.

You could use the old drive to boot the machine, if you have Windows 7 or newer - the newer OSs are fairly adaptive to new equipment... but I don't recommend booting from the 'old' drive, either.

Also, don't blow out any of the old OS files on the 'old' drive until you're satisfied you've recovered all of your data. They're just taking up space since your machine is running off the new 'C' drive.

FWIW: I keep a wired set of USB devices (keyboard and mouse) just for the specific purpose of if my wireless junk quits, whether because of dead batteries or whatever. Usually, when a BT or RF wireless device quits, it's because of loss of signal or power - restoring the signal and/or power usually fixes the issue, but in the meantime plugging a wired device in usually gets me through the outage.

The keyboard solution Tony mentioned usually works as well.

Hope this helps.

My first encounter with a computer was a Sperry Univac. After that
I moved to a Heathkit system with a 8" floppy drive that held a
staggering 98 KB. Once bought a Sun2 120 so I could learn UNIX.
Or is it Unix or unix and what does that mean? I am not unfamiliar
with computers but the modern tech takes all the fun out of it.

So just plug in older SATA and all should work fine. Keep you posted.

mike
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