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Cheaper to replace front fender?
#1
My front drivers fender has a dent in the side towards the front that has gotten into the body line.  Would I be better off finding a good used fender or get a body man to get the dent out?  Just thinking about cost.  I'm thinking it is going to take a body man several hours to get the dent out to where if I can find a good used fender I would be better off.  I would rather not put an aftermarket fender on it.  I don't think the steel is as good of quality as an good used OEM would be.

Thanks!
Wade
1972 Mach 1 351 cj 4speed
"We confide in our strength, without boasting of it; we respect that of others, without fearing it."--Thomas Jefferson

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#2
Do you have some pics of the dent? Close up? Good used rust free fender is going to be hard to come by.

'73 Grandé H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

'73 F code convertible. Bright red. Needs total restore. (IE HOT MESS)

- Jason
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#3
If you post a pict of the damage that would help...

I'd say, get a body man quote first, some have tooling (and experience), and would pull a nasty looking dent in no time. Something you'd stamp impossible to be done in matter of minutes...

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#4
Not a great pic.


[Image: 20190302-165019.jpg]

Thanks!
Wade
1972 Mach 1 351 cj 4speed
"We confide in our strength, without boasting of it; we respect that of others, without fearing it."--Thomas Jefferson

  Reply
#5
I would pull the fender and pound it out myself. It wouldn't take much hammer and dolly work to get it close enough so an 1/8" of Bondo would take care of the finish. The top dent may have stretched the metal a little, and may require some shrinking. I'm not a good bodyman, don't like doing it, but I wouldn't hesitate taking that on.

What's the worse that could happen? Getting a bodyman to finish it or buying a different fender.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#6
+1 a little hammer and dolly work and you could get that pretty good in a short period of time.

'73 Grandé H Code. Headman long tube headers, T-5 Transmission, 3.70 Traclok, Lowered 1" all around, Aussie 2v heads w/ 2.19 intake, 1.71 exhaust, screw in studs, full roller cam 608/612 lift 280/281 duration LSA 112, Quick Fuel 750 CFM double pumper, AirGap intake.

'73 F code convertible. Bright red. Needs total restore. (IE HOT MESS)

- Jason
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#7
If you check out Fabrices build thread you will see he used clamps and a block of wood to sort a valance out. Your dent is near enough to the edge of the metal to give it a try

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#8
@Don C +1
As you consider a replacement, you take no risk...
This looks to me a perfect occupation for Saturday afternoon! Smile

I'm hitting metal only once in a while, but here my amateur body man eye sees a fender that can be saved without too much troubles.
I'd start by cleaning to bare metal on both side, so you actually see and most important feel the problems.
Aside the small dent above the side marker that will work against you while pushing outward, most is a push from the inside. You can do this with soft wood, you could use the inner reinforcement as a lever for this. Gently massage from the outer ring of the dents and it will regain its pressed shape fairly easy for the most. Then hammer(s) + dolly

You could also make a buck using the other side, by simply reporting with a marker the shape on a piece of paper, then fold that paper once you have the shape and by transparence you have the opposite that you can use to cut some MDF/wood to verify the fender shape, you could even use it to reshape acting as a dolly.

Take your time, better a 1000 small hits than big ones and as @Don C says, a tad of bondo will do the rest!

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#9
I am no body man my self. I have watch my friend who has 35 + years use heat , wet sponge and a dolly to work out dents. He uses less that a 1/8 inch or less of bondo. It is magic to see him work. Also, those fenders are prone to rust at the bottom. It may be good to remove the fender to see what debris is sitting there. Maybe removing and carrying it to someone you trust to fix it. Just a thought here!

Thanks,
mustang7173 Thankyouyellow

"Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway" -- John Wayne
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#10
From a cost perspective, definitely better to fix that then try to locate a perfect fender...
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