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Best brake pads and shoes
#1
What's the best to use. 'best' being defined as 'will allow me to stop the best'. Not as concerned about how long they will last or if there is less/more 'environnmental' impact. (Just because I don't drive the car much anyways)

'Mike'
73 Convertible - 351C/4V CC heads/4bolt/forged flat tops/comp 270/rhodes/mallory unilite/tri-power/hookers/glasspacks/c6/3.50 limited slip/Gear Vendors/Global West sub frames, strut rods and shelby style traction bars/ Rear sway bar/tilt steering (not original)

Pics of modifications included in:
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#2
Unless you have upgraded your brakes, you likely have a single piston floating caliper up front and drums in the rear. Fluid should be replaced and any issues with the system addressed prior to a brake job. No leak, no matter how small, is acceptable in a brake system.

Because of the limitations of a stock system, modern pads and materials aren't always the best choice for our cars. How the car will be driven is a huge factor in your decision process.

Organic pads are original equipment. Semimetallic brake pads have sintered metal in the pad for improved performance and heat resistance, with the side effect being more noise and brake dust.

Carbon-metallic and ceramic pads are used in racing applications. These materials are not acceptable for most street use as they do best when they get hot. In street use, they rarely get hot enough to be effective and they tend to make a lot of noise and yield an extremely hard pedal. Now some modern vehicles do use ceramic pads and if you have upgraded your brakes, they may be acceptable for summer driving and spirited use. (I'm running organic with a rear disc brake conversion and slotted rotors)

Organic brake pads are the most affordable and the quietest, They absorb noise, vibration, and heat adequately in street use. Semimetallic pads do a better stopping job, but are noisier.

On drum brakes, use fresh springs and wheel cylinders and drums. Drums should not be turned multiple times, one and done. When the drums are at the maximum limit of wear, they are going to dissipate heat more slowly and the additional travel of the shoes will reduce braking power. Also, you may have a choice between riveted and bonded shoes. Riveted are preferred for superior heat transfer.

Hmm . . . did I forget anything?

[Image: 1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png]

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!
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#3
Jeff73Mach1;106618 Wrote:Unless you have upgraded your brakes, you likely have a single piston floating caliper up front and drums in the rear. Fluid should be replaced and any issues with the system addressed prior to a brake job. No leak, no matter how small, is acceptable in a brake system.

Because of the limitations of a stock system, modern pads and materials aren't always the best choice for our cars. How the car will be driven is a huge factor in your decision process.

Organic pads are original equipment. Semimetallic brake pads have sintered metal in the pad for improved performance and heat resistance, with the side effect being more noise and brake dust.

Carbon-metallic and ceramic pads are used in racing applications. These materials are not acceptable for most street use as they do best when they get hot. In street use, they rarely get hot enough to be effective and they tend to make a lot of noise and yield an extremely hard pedal. Now some modern vehicles do use ceramic pads and if you have upgraded your brakes, they may be acceptable for summer driving and spirited use. (I'm running organic with a rear disc brake conversion and slotted rotors)

Organic brake pads are the most affordable and the quietest, They absorb noise, vibration, and heat adequately in street use. Semimetallic pads do a better stopping job, but are noisier.

On drum brakes, use fresh springs and wheel cylinders and drums. Drums should not be turned multiple times, one and done. When the drums are at the maximum limit of wear, they are going to dissipate heat more slowly and the additional travel of the shoes will reduce braking power. Also, you may have a choice between riveted and bonded shoes. Riveted are preferred for superior heat transfer.

Hmm . . . did I forget anything?
I would have just said wagner but I like your answer better
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#4
Check out the Hawk but they only have pads no shoes

http://www.hawkperformance.com/parts/
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#5
caspianwendell;106622 Wrote:I would have just said wagner but I like your answer better

As a lawyer, I am part of a profession that used to charge by the word.

lol

[Image: 1_01_07_15_8_53_18.png]

"I love my Hookers!" and "Get some Strange" probably have a different connotation to non automotive enthusiasts!
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#6
Tnfastbk;106624 Wrote:Check out the Hawk but they only have pads no shoes

http://www.hawkperformance.com/parts/

+1, I have hawk HPS pads on my daily driver and the stop very well for me. I'll probably upgrade the mustang to them as well.

Jayson
[Image: 36319488731_8f2a376549_z.jpg]
73 Mach 1 Mustang
89 Dodge Shadow ES
94 Jeep Wrangler

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#7
Yup...I agree on the plain old stock pads...They last long enough for me...And stop just fine too..With out your brakes sounding like poo...My freind went the high carbon ones...And wished he didnt...lol...They started to chatter and needed to get super hot to even work...lol...Unless your pro racing or delivering news papers on a mountain side...not needed...Stock ones last a long long time under normal use.
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#8
Jeff73Mach1;106628 Wrote:
caspianwendell;106622 Wrote:I would have just said wagner but I like your answer better

As a lawyer, I am part of a profession that used to charge by the word.

lol

LOL...and confusing the crap out of people in the process with all forthwith and whereas's.
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#9
Bendix, AutoBarn. I pick the least expensive. No issues.

[Image: 11jmcuc.png]
351C Bold Manners, Brash Attitude
Favorite Teams: Michigan Wolverines and Whoever Is Playing Ohio State.

When I drive past a herd of cows, the cows MOO at me
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#10
Jeff73Mach1;106618 Wrote:Unless you have upgraded your brakes, you likely have a single piston floating caliper up front and drums in the rear. Fluid should be replaced and any issues with the system addressed prior to a brake job. No leak, no matter how small, is acceptable in a brake system.

Because of the limitations of a stock system, modern pads and materials aren't always the best choice for our cars. How the car will be driven is a huge factor in your decision process.

Organic pads are original equipment. Semimetallic brake pads have sintered metal in the pad for improved performance and heat resistance, with the side effect being more noise and brake dust.

Carbon-metallic and ceramic pads are used in racing applications. These materials are not acceptable for most street use as they do best when they get hot. In street use, they rarely get hot enough to be effective and they tend to make a lot of noise and yield an extremely hard pedal. Now some modern vehicles do use ceramic pads and if you have upgraded your brakes, they may be acceptable for summer driving and spirited use. (I'm running organic with a rear disc brake conversion and slotted rotors)

Organic brake pads are the most affordable and the quietest, They absorb noise, vibration, and heat adequately in street use. Semimetallic pads do a better stopping job, but are noisier.

On drum brakes, use fresh springs and wheel cylinders and drums. Drums should not be turned multiple times, one and done. When the drums are at the maximum limit of wear, they are going to dissipate heat more slowly and the additional travel of the shoes will reduce braking power. Also, you may have a choice between riveted and bonded shoes. Riveted are preferred for superior heat transfer.

Hmm . . . did I forget anything?

Well done!

[Image: 2rr7aiv.png]

Just cruising along minding our own business when BAM!!! The LAWS show up.
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