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Bead Roller
#1
Busy looking at materials and tools I need to make my own trunk floor. As shipping overseas makes a new one simply too crazy. (around 700 at my door). I can buy a plate of 1mm industrial steel 5x5 meters have it cut in plates of the size I wish for 75 euros and have enough metal to build 1/2 a car Smile


I came across an affordable bead roller (200 euros) working up to 1.2mm thick, 450mm from a side. Perfect for the job but wonder the kind of die I would need to order with it (if not part of the 6 provided) to create something similar to the 2 long beads on each side of the curvy tank inlet. I would expect some "j" profile.

If anyone used one of these babies, any tips, recommendations welcome...
[Image: beadroller_464mm.jpg]

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#2
Fabrice have you shopped around for trunk floor???
I am sure you can get a full floor pan and trunk for 700
There must be shipping companies in Holland that will ship via sea freight. I have used that method on larger or heavier items.
Okay it takes a little longer but makes it worthwhile.
I have seen the GREAT work you have done on your project and i think it would be a mistake to try and replicate with a inferior 1mm sheet matal. Then You got to keep altering shape to get a perfect fit.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Mustang-Trunk-F...Swj85YQdcs
$128.99 Plus FREE SHIPPING WITHIN U.S. The company i use to ship to UK have U.S postal code 33162. Sea freight companies charge by size. I am sure you would get it shipped by sea freight company for around 100 Euro. Then you could pick up from the docks or have them deliver to you. How many hours would it take to make a trunk floor? And would those hours be best spent elsewhere on the car

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#3
Well, thing is, its not just the floor that I need and as I enjoy making/building stuffs, time is not really playing a role. I also want know and practice more metal work.
Add to this, that I bought enough metal pre-formed for the 73 (did the trunk floor too) to know its not always a perfect fit or quality. You have to alter the shape anyway.

For the tail panel, and quarters, however I'll order them. In the 90's there was always a per boat option at Summit, NPD etc...
I'll PM you for details on how you ship to UK by boat for 100 vs the 835 I see on your e-bay link. I'm surely interested in this!

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#4
Most if not all sea freight stops off in Holland and unloads its cargo for most of mainland Europe. Once unloaded the ships sail to UK ports. My shipper is UK based so logistics of sending UK to Holland would be high.
Try and find a local shipping agent or ask one of the big American car importers in Holland to ship it for you. If you have a Dutch based American Car magazine you will find plenty of shippers in there that are more than willing to import for you as they want as much in o ne container as they can fit in. Using a American car importer could work out cheaper as he could put your items in the cars he imports making his shipping costs cheaper. Theres 2 or 3 big companies in Holland that buy, sell & import American cars. This site has a lot of big importers into mainland Europe. I try not to visit this site as theres too much temption for me  Big Grin

https://www.classic-trader.com

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#5
I was an automotive tooling engineer and tool & die maker so I know what it takes to make metal parts. The trunk floor is not an easy one to start with. To do it right by hand you would have to probably make in several sections. You would use a leather shot bag and hammer to move the metal and then an english wheel to shape it. I have also seen some prototype parts formed using wood dies. Most people make a wood buck to use to check the parts and hold them while welding the pieces together. The problem you will encounter when hand forming parts is that you cannot control the material wanting to wrinkle. When the parts were formed originally the die closes and used a cushion or binder to hold the sheet of metal and the press continues and either stretch forms the part or a double action press might also be used.
Even today some low volume cars have hand formed parts in them. The Viper and Prowler were a couple that Chrysler did. The rocker boxes were aluminum on the Viper. They heated up the aluminum and had a temporary die that did some of the forming. One man could to I think two sets a day.
You probably have some shops in UK that still do had forming or prototype work for the automotive factories. Some of the early Ferrari's never had tooling built for the bodies they were 100% hand formed.
There are lots of prototype shops in the U.S. that I have used in the past. All new products require prototypes for testing and concept approval. We did everything from automotive, lawn equipment, farm equipment, cooking grills, etc.
In some cases if you have existing part they can actually cast a plaster copy of it or use epoxy to cast and make a few parts using that for forming.
Most true prototype forming dies are made from an alloy of Zinc called kirksite. You rent the material usually for one year then they melt it down and use over. Here is a picture of a kirksite prototype draw die. They now laser trim and usually have other form dies for flanges.
[Image: Kirksite-Tooling.jpg]
There is a formed part in the tool or you could see the outer part of the tool that you see sitting on the cushion pins is what holds the sheet of metal while the upper cavity comes down and pushes the ring down and allows the male form to come up and form the metal.
You need to find someone coming over for a visit have them cut a trunk floor in half box it up and pay the $50.00 extra bag charge, lol. I have taken items to Africa that way with no issue. They can tell it is a sample part.
Even with my experience I will buy before I make by hand too time consuming and for a novice very difficult. I do encourage people to try new things but a trunk is not where you should start. Maybe form so patches for bottom of door or wheel house to start with.
Going to an auction next week here there is a 73 mustang, and lots of shop equipment. English wheel, lathe, couple rotisseries, welders. I want the english wheel to play with. You can smash a finger very quick with one, lol.
Cheers,
David


When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
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David
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#6
You are correct David, I was thinking in making it in sections.
I know its a challenge, lots of work and I would certainly hit a wall, get problems a few times, need to redo, but its not just in me to pay around 1k for something I know I can make. There is a company here that makes custom cabines for trucks. They have all kind of tooling and skilled people. I plan go pay them a visit next week with picts, they prolly have some services/skills/advise to offer. The goal being to have an healthy car and the way I want to have the trunk in the end, no matter how near It would be from original or if I would use a repro, the trunk floor will not be visible. Its all about being robust as a trunk floor must be.

After Steve's reply (pegleg), I'm currently seeking at ways to ship (floor and other panels) per boat as I used to do in the 90's from France.
If the costs would then be acceptable, I'm surely not that crazy and would then buy of course new & ready. Otherwise, I'm going for it.
[ Maybe form so patches for bottom of door or wheel house to start with]
Unfortunately that's on the rusty menu too Wink

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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#7
Fabrice: I think you are on the right track. I have worked with metal shaping using only a vice, dolly/hammer, and bean bags, and have formed all sorts of shapes to fit my needs. Sure, one would love to have a nice set of brakes and English wheels, but you can still do a lot with everyday tools, if you are patient enough. A trunk drop-off floor isn't that complicated, unless you want to re-create the ridges. A true trunk floor is basically a flat piece of metal (at least it is on the earlier models) with a ridge all around. Nevermind...I just saw a picture of a 71-73 trunk floor, and it is fairly complicated with a lowered section in the center. If you're willing to compromise and have a fairly flat floor, I think that can be done easily enough.

Let me check your shorts!
http://midlifeharness.com

[Image: Flamicon2.jpg]


[Image: oldfart.png]
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#8
As a guy that has worked in sheetmetal for going on 20 years, I see lots of frustration in your future with that bead roller. I like your idea to work with a local shop and have them make the sections you need. If you're planning on just replacing the drop offs and the flat sections of the trunk floor, that is doable, but you'll still need special tools for the ribbing. Forming the bulge in the center is going to take some real work.


[Image: IMAG0976.jpg]


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#9
(07-06-2018, 08:04 AM)Hemikiller Wrote: As a guy that has worked in sheetmetal for going on 20 years, I see lots of frustration in your future with that bead roller. I like your idea to work with a local shop and have them make the sections you need. If you're planning on just replacing the drop offs and the flat sections of the trunk floor, that is doable, but you'll still need special tools for the ribbing. Forming the bulge in the center is going to take some real work.


[Image: IMAG0976.jpg]
Totally get you. I don't pick tools and go head down. For now, i'm looking at the options I have in case I choose to build that thing myself.
I like to be prepped when I start something and as the tools, materials etc.. are not free, if I buy one, I want something I can learn/improve from and reuse it later on.
I've seen a similar one in action and you can get very nice result, practice/experience being of course the key. One that cost 10 times this one, with an electric rheostat pedal to adjust the speed would be better but then its cheaper to buy the preformed metal as I don't plan to build floors for a living Smile

There are also other options vs redo all, the bulge in center that you name for instance, is not damaged, there is rust on it but very light. So I could reuse it. At least seen from the inside. I need remove the tank to see underneath.
Next week, I should also have some feedback from this company and/or may be an alternative shipment.

For now looking at all my options and was curious if someone used a similar bead roller and which dies would be required to generate something similar to the original shape.

73 modified Grandé 351C. Almost done. 
71 429CJ. In progress
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