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Austin Vert seeks advice on lifting Mustangs up.
#1
Wrench 
Hi to all,

I was reading this article in Mustang 360* on lifting Mustangs on hoists, and potentially damaging some front suspension components.

http://www.mustangandfords.com/how-to/ch...on-damage/

Mechanical tech issues are not my strongest field of knowledge, so i'm seeking advice from the top mechanical tech guys out there about lifting your Mustang and damaging the front suspension AS PER WHAT THE ARTICLE STATES.

To the best of my knowledge, i always thought that it was OK when a car gets lifted at the front by a normal car jack. You use the center of the front cross member to jack from as your jacking point. In that case, the front suspension drops fully on both sides. According to the article, that's a big no, no.Huh

Also, if your jacking with a two post hoist, with four arms, you place the arms on the under body or chassis, and so again, the front suspension would drop fully. That again is a no, no according to the article. Using a drive on 4 post ramp hoist is not going to be an issue here as all four wheels are being supported.

So what's the go here? Does it really have such a detrimental effect on the front suspension damage wise, if you let it drop fully without using these special support brackets as mentioned in the article? My local pro mechanic lets my front suspension drop fully when he has my Mustangs on his two post hoist.Chin

What's your opinion on that? Let me know.

Thanks,

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
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#2
I've talked about this with a friend of mine who works on cars a lot and who's owned classic Mustangs and Mopars all his life. Plus he works for other people so it's hardly possible to walk into his shop when there's no classic car on the 2-post lift and he has never, ever in the twenty plus years he's worked on cars seen any suspension damage resulting from the fact that a car got lifted up.
After some brainstorming we agreed that the only way this MIGHT happen was if the rubber bushings were very old and brittle to a point where driving a car with such bushings would be irresponsible in itself.
I'm not saying this kind of damage can't happen or has never happened before but neither my friend or anyone else I know who works on classics has ever seen it happen.
Just saying.

[Image: 1z21rv4.png]

Mike

"If I were you...... I´d rather be me."  Tongue

Check out my video:
http://www.7173mustangs.com/thread-my-mustang-in-action

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#3
I did not read the article but the Ford manuals tell you to block the A arm so that it does not fall all the load on the shock rubbers and also twist the strut rod. What it does is split the bushings because they are pinched metal to metal not just bearing an even load. All it takes is a wood block if you don't have the tool to put under the upper A arm between the frame rail. Does not let the suspension fall to the max when lifted.
Sure you can get by maybe once or twice but how many people on here have complained about their upper front shock bushings splitting?
Need to dig out my shop manuals and scan the page.


When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??
Tongue
David
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#4
Neither my owner's manual or service manual lists any precautions for lifting the front end with the suspension dangling. I've been jacking up the front of my '71 for several years, and before that other Mustangs and other Ford cars for many years with no problems.

In addition to what Mike said, I might be cautious about letting the suspension dangle if I had urethane bushings on the strut rods, that might put more stress on the threaded end of the strut rods, as well as the frame bracket.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
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#5
I only use a drive-on lift with slider jacks, since that's what I have at my disposal at the shop. At home, I usually boost it up under the engine cross-member with a floor jack, and support the car under the torque boxes up front with jack stands and use the differential and axle tubes out back.

No mishaps with the front bushings whatsoever... although, early on I'd already replaced them with urethane bushings... just because.

Don't know if that helps, but that's what works for me.

Eric

[Image: mach1sig2.gif]
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#6
I have had my wheels dangling on my previous big block Mach 1 for any type of servicing and more importantly for the purposes of this discussion; for 5 months straight every winter for 20 years straight. Never had a problem!

Having said this, there is a definite issue here when considering the suspension geometry that by design, is ripe for the possible issue as noted with the front shock absorbers. I would also throw into this mix, the front end torsion bar bushings at the front cross member (sorry, can't think of the correct name for these two bars right now...) as well as the front end stabilizer bar bushings. All these components bear extra weight when the suspension is left hanging. Just my .02 cents on the topic.
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#7
Been jacking cars up and letting them down the same way for years and never had a problem, but when I do let them drop I let them drop gradually and not slam straight down. I think if anything happens to components from doing this, then there must be a problem as the forces of everyday driving hitting potholes would have more force than letting your car down off a jack. I suppose I'm doomed because my front is still up in the air and won't be down until tomorrow, bloody grease gun. What next, put too much washer fluid in your reservoir you'll blow the windscreen out, gees there really is some crazy misguided crap out there. No wonder people get confused just trying to do maintenance on their own cars.
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#8
OK, at this stage i will thank all you guys for your personal input and opinions on this one.

The feedback is interesting, as there is a confliction of opinion to a small degree. But what message comes home loud and clear i think, is the fact that lifting a car and letting the front suspension drop down freely without strutting the springs has been the accepted practice since Adam was a boy, and there hasn't been to much drama happening over the years by going this way.

So brace if you want to be really sure, but it's business as usual with out the bracing when jacking the car up or the front end in particular.

Thanks again for all your input and help.thumb

Greg.Smile

whistling LORD, MR FORD - JERRY REED
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#9
4Vforever;285956 Wrote:Been jacking cars up and letting them down the same way for years and never had a problem, but when I do let them drop I let them drop gradually and not slam straight down. I think if anything happens to components from doing this, then there must be a problem as the forces of everyday driving hitting potholes would have more force than letting your car down off a jack. I suppose I'm doomed because my front is still up in the air and won't be down until tomorrow, bloody grease gun. What next, put too much washer fluid in your reservoir you'll blow the windscreen out, gees there really is some crazy misguided crap out there. No wonder people get confused just trying to do maintenance on their own cars.

Exactly... This issue would have come to a head many, many years ago had there been an ongoing documented concern with front suspension failing because of this concern. But, there is a definite "reader beware component to the facts provided".

One should give their own due consideration to the presented facts...

In this instance, good old fashion common sense will ensure that the suspensions on our cars and many other Ford brands will last throughout their service life. We need to keep in mind that much of what is written in that article is factual. There is absolutely no doubt that the factory set up is not perfect when it comes to allowing the front suspension to hang free. The downward force of the front coil springs puts excessive strain on the noted components I mentioned above and will take its toll on these items over time. Due to the reminder afforded by this article, moving forward, I will be having these spring perches made for winter storing (not for servicing at this time) my current restoration in the future...
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