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'73 Mach 1 full restoration - The Beginning
#1
Greetings people, I've been reading through the threads and have gained a ton of good information. However, there is one thing I haven't seen a lot of... how to start. I currently have my Mach 1 completely disassembled and on a rack, similar to a rotisserie but the front of the car can swivel up with a lift instead of spinning the whole car around. Anyway, I'm to the point where most people are telling me to go ahead with the media blast. But, before I take that critical step I happen to have the minor issue of some serious cancer all over the freaken place which leads to my question. Should I media blast, take pics, then mark the not chewed through parts after the epoxy primer and make repairs, OR, should I replace the cancer spots first, primer the new pieces, then media blast the 2 square inches of original paint that's left over and go from there? I see the pro's and cons to going both ways so I figured my best bet would be to talk to the people that have actually been through it. Anyway, I appreciate any info you guys have for me and even more for taking the time to respond...
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#2
Would love to see how your car is set up on your rack. It would be far easier to blast everything first, do the repairs, then Prime the entire car. Done it this way for several ground up restos. Just my .02

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#3
Great question. I farmed my body restoration out after I did floors, and wheel houses.

The guy I hired said he did not like media blast to strip the car because he had several restorations that had the media loosen from a corner during color coat and ruin his work. He said there was no guarantee you can get all the blast media out. Having said that, I know a lot of people blast because it's readily available.

My body guy hauled mine from KC to Evansville Indiana to have it dipped. The facility was called Ready Strip or something like that. He said it was much easier to do the welding on clean metal.

The down side. EVERYTHING has to come off the car and be inventoried. EVERYTHING!

So mine looked like this:

[Image: 1673_16_02_13_2_38_01.jpeg]

Then This:

[Image: 1673_16_02_13_2_50_34.jpeg]

and now this!!


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#4
It depends on the amount of rust and work required (sounds like you have a lot). On my rotisserie restoration, the required metal repairs (considered minor and straightforward) were completed before the car (unibody) was sent out for sandblasting and the smaller removable parts for chemical dipping. I would imagine that extensive rust repair would require the blasting process to be completed first so you know where the virgin metal still is evident.
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#5
6972boss;288781 Wrote:Would love to see how your car is set up on your rack. It would be far easier to blast everything first, do the repairs, then Prime the entire car. Done it this way for several ground up restos. Just my .02

I was thinking about going this route but had concerns about the new metal starting to rust and the old metal getting worse without being primered. I have the luxury of no garage, just a driveway and a shed to store parts. The driveway has a car port but it's not weather proof by any means. Maybe it could work if I used ospho on the metal after the media blast?

I'll get some pics going on that rack for you, it's nothing fancy, but it'll work.
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#6
kcmash;288786 Wrote:Great question. I farmed my body restoration out after I did floors, and wheel houses.

The guy I hired said he did not like media blast to strip the car because he had several restorations that had the media loosen from a corner during color coat and ruin his work. He said there was no guarantee you can get all the blast media out. Having said that, I know a lot of people blast because it's readily available.

My body guy hauled mine from KC to Evansville Indiana to have it dipped. The facility was called Ready Strip or something like that. He said it was much easier to do the welding on clean metal.

The down side. EVERYTHING has to come off the car and be inventoried. EVERYTHING!

So mine looked like this:

[Image: 1673_16_02_13_2_38_01.jpeg]

Then This:

[Image: 1673_16_02_13_2_50_34.jpeg]

and now this!!

I thought about getting the car dipped but that's about as far as I got with the idea, not even sure where I would go to do it and if it is cost effective,. I'm sure I'd have to ship the car pretty far to get it done though. Living in the wonderful state of California with all the chemical restrictions I'm sure it'll be fun and pricey too. As for tearing it down, Already done! The only thing left on the car is brake lines, the fuel line, paint and rust...I'll look into it though and see what I come up with. Thanks!

Also, yours looks like it's coming along quite nice... it looks like you had a good starting place.
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#7
Pastel Blue;288788 Wrote:It depends on the amount of rust and work required (sounds like you have a lot). On my rotisserie restoration, the required metal repairs (considered minor and straightforward) were completed before the car (unibody) was sent out for sandblasting and the smaller removable parts for chemical dipping. I would imagine that extensive rust repair would require the blasting process to be completed first so you know where the virgin metal still is evident.

That's pretty much what I was thinking, and yes I have some interesting areas that need to be repaired. If I didn't have so much history with this car I wouldn't ever consider it as a candidate for a restoration. Thanks for the input! Maybe i should replace the straight forward stuff (floors, rear quarters, trunk floor blah blah blah), then blast or Chem dip and primer. That way most of the ugly is done before primer and only the horrible work is left over.
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#8
First thing i would do is rent a garage then get the car dipped. You would save a ton of time if your car was stored inside and have somewhere you feel more comfortable in. I don't have a garage or a driveway so my predicament is slightly worse than yours.
Good luck with your restoration

Steve
1971 Grandé
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#9
I'm in the same situation as you with only a shed to store tools/parts etc. My idea is to replace rusty panels and do most repairs then to media blast engine bay, door jambs etc. I just lightly etch prime repaired areas and welds. To keep the weather out I cover it with a weatherproof car cover. Will look forward to your build and yes would like to see your rack set up. I'm still considering a rotisserie but the steel is a bit expensive.
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#10
Another downside of chemical dip is that the chemicals get into the joints that are welded and is very hard to remove the chemical. This shows up when one paints the car, and all sorts of problems with paint start appearing.

Some panels are seam-sealed together (e.g. hood, trunk lid), and the chemical dissolves that bonding.

As you can tell, I'm not a fan of chemical dips.

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