• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3D printers
#1
With the introduction of 3D printers unavailable plastic parts should soon be widely available. All thats requied is a C.A.D designer and a original part. There are also some reproduction parts out there that are not fir for purpose so those parts makers could be challenged in their production.
Are there any plastic parts that are not reproduced or badly reproduced that people need?

Steve
1971 Grandé
  Reply
#2
Quarter window trim. for the sports roof

[Image: 20r9ylt.jpg]
  Reply
#3
3 pin door jamb connector.

Let me check your shorts!
http://midlifeharness.com

[Image: Flamicon2.jpg]


[Image: oldfart.png]
  Reply
#4
Let me look into printer prices and speak to a CAD designer

Steve
1971 Grandé
  Reply
#5
From another forum, a person attempted the 3 pin door jamb connector, but had lots of problems with it; the final product didn't pass muster as the 3 pin switch wouldn't mate well.

Let me check your shorts!
http://midlifeharness.com

[Image: Flamicon2.jpg]


[Image: oldfart.png]
  Reply
#6
Like they say, garbage in, garbage out.

It's going to depend on the quality of the scanner and printer, plus the software and the person editing the scans.



“If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”
--Albert Einstein
  Reply
#7
Fastback and vert A pillar covers.
  Reply
#8
Ok guys, I've worked with what has become known as 3D Printing for years, like from the mid 80's. It was then known as Stereo Lithography and yes, the process has come a LOOOONGG way since then. Originally we could only make small parts that were more for "look-see" rather than actual working parts. I still made prototype air cleaner and related parts by vacuum forming right up till about 10 years ago when usable "3D printed" parts were becoming available and at cheaper pricing. I could still cut a weld most of these pieces when quick changes were needed. What really got interesting was we could now "print" a complete air induction manifold that usually only needed minor touch up to be fully functional. Before it entailed building a temporary injection mold costing many tens of thousands of dollars. Even then those "printed" manifolds would cost anywhere around 10 grand a piece. These were made from a Nylon based material and were very strong and withstood all the testing required to verify for production.
Yes it's a great tool, but it is NOT in my opinion a replacement for injection molded parts good enough for our cars. Problem is, these "printed" parts are built up in layers. The thinner the layer, the better the quality, but that brings a higher price tag as it take way longer to "print". As I said, this technique has come a long way in the last 10 years and will continue to evolve and someday it may make very satisfactory parts, but not yet.

Geoff.
[+] 1 user Likes Stanglover's post
  Reply
#9
So, being an engineer, I have one part I want to get a 3-d model of and try to print with a Nylon or ultem material.

What is it?  The power window bezel clip.  Originally made of stamped steel, this part could easily be printed and function properly.

I do have a pair of clips, but have lost my modeling skills after taking on management roles.  

kcmash
  Reply
#10
(08-07-2018, 05:26 PM)Stanglover Wrote: Ok guys, I've worked with what has become known as 3D Printing for years, like from the mid 80's. It was then known as Stereo Lithography and yes, the process has come a LOOOONGG way since then. Originally we could only make small parts that were more for "look-see" rather than actual working parts. I still made prototype air cleaner and related parts by vacuum forming right up till about 10 years ago when usable "3D printed" parts were becoming available and at cheaper pricing. I could still cut a weld most of these pieces when quick changes were needed. What really got interesting was we could now "print" a complete air induction manifold that usually only needed minor touch up to be fully functional. Before it entailed building a temporary injection mold costing many tens of thousands of dollars. Even then those "printed" manifolds would cost anywhere around 10 grand a piece. These were made from a Nylon based material and were very strong and withstood all the testing required to verify for production.
Yes it's a great tool, but it is NOT in my opinion a replacement for injection molded parts good enough for our cars. Problem is, these "printed" parts are built up in layers. The thinner the layer, the better the quality, but that brings a higher price tag as it take way longer to "print". As I said, this technique has come a long way in the last 10 years and will continue to evolve and someday it may make very satisfactory parts, but not yet.

Geoff.

Well said. Appreciate your candid point-of-view.  Confirms my understandings as well.

Ray

1971 Boss 351  
1972 Q code 4 speed convertible 
1971 Mustang Sportsroof  351-2V FMX 
1973 Mach 1 (parts car)
  Reply
Share Thread:  




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)