• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
1998 Lincoln Mark VIII
#1
The guy that does my pest control service has this car for sale. I v'e owned one of these, and a Mark VII. Nice cars.

http://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/cto/4541592804.html

1972 H-code Mach1
2010 GT Premium
2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T
1995 F150- The "home depot" machine
2012 Harley Davidson Road Glide Ultra
  Reply
#2
Mk VIIs are great cars if you are a decent mechanic...you will need to work on them consistently to keep them going right.

Mk VIIIs are mechanical and electrical nighmares...you must really be devoted to own one of these.
  Reply
#3
Kit Sullivan;189449 Wrote:Mk VIIs are great cars if you are a decent mechanic...you will need to work on them consistently to keep them going right.

Mk VIIIs are mechanical and electrical nighmares...you must really be devoted to own one of these.

The Mark VII biggest issue that I ever had was dealing with the air-ride.

The Mark VIII, the biggest issue I had was the Intake Rail diaphrams, was kinda pain to replace those, but other wise trouble free.

I had 225k + miles on both when I sold them.

1972 H-code Mach1
2010 GT Premium
2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T
1995 F150- The "home depot" machine
2012 Harley Davidson Road Glide Ultra
  Reply
#4
I have the same car that I will be using the engine and Trans for my 71 Cougar.
  Reply
#5
The air suspension can be a pain in these cars, but is actually really simple to maintain, diagnose and repair once you learn the system. All the parts can be had relatively cheaply if you know where to look. NEVER take one of these cars to a dealership for air suspension repair.

The VIIIs had the air compressor/ dryer low inside the fender...moisture collects easily in the compressor and ruins it. The VIIs had the assembly high up on the inner fender, easily accesible to work on.

The early-gen HID headlights on the gen-II VIIIs are notoriouz for early failure and very expensive to repair. Ford offers a kit to convert them back to standard halogen bulbs, but even the kit is $800 or so...

The HO 5.0 w/ AOD trans in the VIIs are bulletproof...the 4.6 DOHC in the VIIIs are dependable, the AOD-E less so.

I have three MK VIIs...I love 'em. An excellent blend of muscle and luxury.
I had an VIII. Decently quick, but just too problematical. Sold it first chance.

Interesting trick for the 4.6 DOHC engine: they were rated at 275 in the Lincolns, the same motor was over 300 in the Cobra Mustang.
Place a piece of wood on top of the fuel pressure regulator, give it a sharp rap with a hammer...somehow it feels like you gained 50 horsepower.
Don't exactly know what it does to the regulator, but I assume it allows it run at a higher pressure to the injectors. Whatever it does, it works pretty well.
No problems ever after doing that, just better performance. I met several guys that did this.
Strange...
  Reply
#6
+1 on not taking to the dealer! I had the Lincoln shop manuals for both the 89 LSC, and the 96 LSC which made them easier to work on.

I ended up replacing all the air springs, valves, and the dryer compressor on my 89 LSC. I did have to replace the front air struts on the 96 LSC.
The HID's on my VIII did go out, I used an aftermarket kit with new ballasts and was much cheaper than the Ford stuff. I wish I had know about the fuel regulator trick, I would have done that. Also, the leather on the seats of the VII was not as durable as the Mark VIII.

Overall I really loved the Mark VII the best though. I really miss that car! Maybe I'll get another someday.

1972 H-code Mach1
2010 GT Premium
2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T
1995 F150- The "home depot" machine
2012 Harley Davidson Road Glide Ultra
  Reply
Share Thread:  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  1971 Lincoln 460 bbf 370 Hp v8 ford pre emission 7.5 runs great - $500 1972MustangSVH 1 1,033 02-13-2015, 01:31 AM
Last Post: Finmach
  1962 Lincoln conv - sold Boss1Ray 2 516 01-25-2014, 12:06 AM
Last Post: cudak888



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)