• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
new dufus
#1
I guess I now get the dufus award.Trying to get the bolt out for the lower control arm bushing. The bolt will turn but not come out. I put the nut on ald tried to punch it out, won't mobe. I put my air gun on and tried to pull it out that way no luck. The only thing I amnaged to do is straighten the tab for the eccentricIf anyone has had this problem give me a shout.Angry

drive it like you stole it
  Reply
#2
The eccentric bolt on the lower control arm is not threaded inside, just the end is threaded to hold on the rear eccentric which is keyed and a nut holds it on.

Just use a punch and hit it from the back and it will pop out.
  Reply
#3
Finally got bolt out. I hope this is repairable.
Jim


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   

drive it like you stole it
  Reply
#4
Glad you got it out, Jim.

Sorry, stuck bolts do not qualify for the Dufus Award. Trying to pull it out without removing the nut, now something like that might put you in the running.... Tongue

Doc

Doc

[Image: 6y14ea.jpg]

Project started 8-7-10
Completed: All new suspension, rebuilt 351C H Code bored .030 over with mild cam and intake, new 3.50 TracLok, custom exhaust system
Current "mini-project": interior upgrade Undecided
  Reply
#5
doc take a good look at the slot for the eccentric. Got a big oops.Confused
Jim

drive it like you stole it
  Reply
#6
Aha! Well, I guess you do qualify as the DoD (Dufus of the Day), and it's reflected in your user title. Smile

Congratulations - I can't think of a more deserving guy (except me)! Cool

Doc

Doc

[Image: 6y14ea.jpg]

Project started 8-7-10
Completed: All new suspension, rebuilt 351C H Code bored .030 over with mild cam and intake, new 3.50 TracLok, custom exhaust system
Current "mini-project": interior upgrade Undecided
  Reply
#7
i would take any type of hammer you could get in there and try and straighten those cam guides out. and i hope you didn't weaken them too much. get a flat head under the engine bolt side and try to raise it enough to get at it with another tool.

those guides allow the rotation of the lower arms by the position of the cam, it won't matter once the final torque is applied, but for adjustments you need to straighten them out.

in other words those guides do not hold the lower arm in place they just allow for a measured amount of movement so you can figure out how much camber you need and to equalize the rear and front cam so they are in about the same position.

once the arm is positioned by the cams, then you lock it down to around 100 foot pounds.

if you can't get a hammer and beat them straight, try a locking pliers, just try not to weaken them too much, bending them back and forth.


i had some damage like that happen when my lower suspension bolt actually snapped and the Cam slipped around and damaged the guides a little.

word of advice don't get the crappy cheap lower suspension arm bolts pay for the more expensive ones or get a set from AMK products.

the reason i had a bolt failure was poor manufacture i had a air bubble inside the bolt were it snapped.

  Reply
#8
Aren't there guides on both sides of the crossmember? Would it be adequate to use just one?

Jeff T.

Low buck, touring style, '73 Convertible "rolling restoration", 351c, 2v heads with a shave and a haircut, Performer intake, Holley 650(ish), roller rockers, screw in studs, guideplates, stainless valves, Duraspark / Motorsports MSD, T-5 conversion. 1-1/8" front, 3/4" rear swaybars KYB shocks and some home brewed subframe connectors. Future plans; JGC steering box, Cobra brakes and... paint, interior, etc.

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passenger.

[Image: 1_12_09_14_10_15_11.png]
  Reply
#9
No because you don't want the lower arm to pivot crooked.

The front cam is tack welded to the bolt head, the rear is keyed with a slot.

The lower mount holes are oblong so the arm can slide in and out and change the camber angle.

If only one cam is used then the pivot angle of the lower arm will be diagonal. This can cause camber angle changes through the suspension travel, you need it to be fixed or handling will be all screwy.

Typically the camber angle is set with the car on the ground full weight on the arm.
So if the alignment guy turns the bolt head to change camber angle and only one cam moves the arm into position, then the other may end up all the way to one side of the oblonged mount, and when they test the camber angle with the laser they may never be able to align the lower arm correctly
  Reply
#10
Oh no.
  Reply
Share Thread:  




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)