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Should I pull the motor? - Printable Version

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+--- Thread: Should I pull the motor? (/thread-should-i-pull-the-motor)

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Should I pull the motor? - scgamecock - 10-07-2016

According to the PO the motor was rebuilt about 4 years ago and then parked after that. Inspecting it from underneath it looks like it has been out before by the absence of road grime.

I know I have a problem with the driver side head gasket either blown or not torqued correctly. I have not had time to investigate much but pretty sure the head will have to come off. While off I am going to open up the exhaust ports and smooth out the runners a little then take them in for valve job, screw in studs, hardened seats, springs and retainers matched to whatever cam I choose.

Here is my dilemma, the oil is clean, there's no hard particles under the valve cover or in the oil, pressure is good, no knocking, and with the exception of fouling plugs on the back 2 driver side cylinders the motor runs fine. I am planning on a fairly large flat tappet solid cam but have no intention of drag racing or prolonged high RPM's Just going for sound, cruising, tire smoke and push you in the seat torque.

Is there a need to pull the motor?????


Thanks
Wade


RE: Should I pull the motor? - turtle5353 - 10-07-2016

No it is not "needed" to do what you want to do. But if you want to clean up the engine compartment and paint and clean the motor and make it all nice and pretty under there, now would definitely be the time to pull the motor. Makes it a lot easier to change heads and cam swap on a motor stand rather than bent over a fender. But you can do it in the car. Its really up to your personal preference. If it was me, I would pull the motor and detail everything up nicely.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - Jeff73Mach1 - 10-07-2016

I find pulling the radiator, motor and transmission to be a relatively easy job. Start to finish it should not take over two hours.

Installation takes a bit longer but still isn't really that bad.

Since you will be pulling the heads anyway, you won't even need anything in the way of additional new gaskets, so it seems to me to be worthwhile.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - Don C - 10-07-2016

Just curious why you're staying with a flat tappet cam, knowing about potential oiling/break-in problems?

I agree, either in the car or on an engine stand. I agree with Kevin and Jeff, I would do it on an engine stand, and replace the cam bearings with the T Meyer restrictor bearings.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - Pegleg - 10-07-2016

I don't think there is any problems with my engine BUT i want to strip it out and check the guts then replace whatever needs to be done and paint the block before it slots back in. It makes sense to me knowing its done 93000 miles before i owned the car and unsure if it has been worked on before i had it. After 40+ years i feel sure its time and money well spent.

In your case you don't know how good a job was performed on the engine by previous owners. Peace of mind is priceless IMO


RE: Should I pull the motor? - Don C - 10-07-2016

Pegleg;279120 Wrote:I don't think there is any problems with my engine BUT i want to strip it out and check the guts then replace whatever needs to be done and paint the block before it slots back in. It makes sense to me knowing its done 93000 miles before i owned the car and unsure if it has been worked on before i had it. After 40+ years i feel sure its time and money well spent.

In your case you don't know how good a job was performed on the engine by previous owners. Peace of mind is priceless IMO

That's an excellent point. When I first got mine it was fairly low mileage and I pulled the heads to have hardened seats installed and the valves replaced. It still has the factory hone marks in the cylinder walls, runs very well, good oil pressure, great compression, but I keep thinking the same thing, be nice to replace the 45 year-old moving components. If I do I'll likely stroke it at that time.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - will e - 10-07-2016

If I was doing both the heads and cam I would pull the engine. You have everything off to yank the heads. Heck, you might be able to leave the exhaust manifolds on.

So it's just a matter of unbolting it from the transmission, engine mounts and Pulling the hood.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - MotoArts - 10-07-2016

Two things that my Dad taught me years ago:

A) Don't fix what ain't broke.
B) Be sure you know where to "pinch the burning fuse" when it comes to "fixing up" an engine. It usually involves a SOLID game plan.

So, if the engine... assuming it is a lower compression stock type rebuild... is fresh, it most likely will have a sub-10:1 compression ratio. Most likely, any solid flat tappet grind that has a rumpity engine note will make for a dog in the performance department.
Be careful, choose the cam as a package... every engine component will affect the outcome.
Back in the day, my high school Torino had a cool sounding lumpity hydro Crane cam, single plane Offenhouser with a 750 Holley on an otherwise stock 9:1 compression '69 351W and a stock FMX... only ran 15.40's with 4.11 gears. I had to force it to spin the rears. It was depressing and somewhat embarrassing. That was before I knew what component selection and intended use was all about.

Yes, engine building is a loooong drawn out process with absolutely no black and white correct answers. Choose wisely.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs - 10-07-2016

I know from your previous posts that you want a thumper. If you do that for a street engine or even race it will not last long. High lift cam and idle do not go hand in hand. It does not matter what break in you use or oil if you let a high lift cam sit and idle it will eat up the cam and lifters. The lobes on the cam get oiling from oil slinging off the crank and some coming from the lifter bores. Even when ran at speed they do not last long. High compression will give you a thump also and not beat the cam to death. But has it's issues also with available fuel.
Like has been stated pulling an engine is a few hours. Hey they had to put the them in in less than 2 minutes on the line.
Pull the engine practice makes perfect.


RE: Should I pull the motor? - Omie01 - 10-08-2016

I agree with most previous responses, pull the motor. You will be happier in the long run. You may find other things that need attention while you are in there.